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May 2, 2006     Cape Gazette
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I ""="=&apos;='==='B'mn'"mmlll L If Rehoboth streetscape to complete paving Paving for the Rehoboth Avenue Streetscape Improvement Project will be finished Monday, May 5, said Carol Everhart, CEO' and President of the Rehoboth Beach-Dewey Beach Chamber of Commerce. She said crosswalks will be installed and the roadway will be painted over the next two weeks. The new rest- room building will also be painted during this time. Lumber and materials for the new pavilion will be placed on the north side of Rehoboth Avenue, which will require six to eight parking spaces near the restroom building. The area will be blocked off with temporary fencing .... City officials ask that drivers avoid no- parking areas to allow construction workers better access to the worksites. Vehicles in no-parking zones will be towed to the City Hall lot, which is behind the Rehoboth Beach Police Department at 229 Rehoboth Ave. The north side of First Street will also be closed for work on the crosswalk. Uninsured motorists' license plates will be confiscated Insurance Commissioner Matt Denn on Wednesday, April 26, displayed license plates that have been confiscated from cars and trucks without insurance, the start of a new crackdown on uninsured vehicles in Delaware "People without auto insurance are not only shirking one of their responsibilities as drivers; they also cause higher rates for those of us with insurance because the damage they do in accidents must be paid for," said Denn. "That's why I am committed to reducing DENN the number of uninsured vehicles on the road, in part by warning the owners of those uninsured vehicles that we will take their license plates." Under a state law proposed by Denn and approved by the General Assembly and governor in 2005, agents from the Departmott-: f Insurance,s Fraud Prevefititn Behu:are now authorized to  remove license plates from uninsured vehi- CAPE GAZETTE - Tuesday, May 2 - Thursday, May 4, 2006 - 3 Division of Motor Vehicles by insurance between 10 and 100 feet wide and several companies. It is estimated that ll to 14 miles long, said Coast Guard spokesman percent of Delawareans drive without Petty Officer 2nd class John Edwards. He insurance, said in most areas, the oil is a rainbow-col- Owners of vehicles that are uninsured ored sheen with little or no oil concentra- receive advance notice in the mail that their tion. license plate is to be seized and have the However, some baseball-sized concen- chance to provide proof that they have trations were found on the shore near Port obtained insurance for the vehicle. Mahon. Shoreline assessment teams have The department's agents recently began found no impact on the Delaware shoreline, confiscating license plates after spending Edwards said. The Coast Guard is exam- several months working out information- ining the oil in the hopes that they will able sharing procedures with DMV and the to learn where it was refined, and conse- courts and after undergoing required train- quently, the source of the spill. ing. Protective booms were placed at Bombay "In a number of cases so far, vehicle :Hook Wildlife Refuge, and oyster beds on owners have actually purchased insurance the New Jersey side of the bay. Edwards when they received our notice that their tag said private firms Miller Environmental, would be taken," said Denn. "This initia- Clean Ventures Marine and Delaware River tive sends a message that Delaware is seri- and Bay Cooperative have been contracted ous about reducing uninsured vehicles and for the recovery and cleanup operations. hopefully will spur many of those who have ignored the law to get insurance." Cape board to host Off sheen spotted reception Tuesday, May 2 The Cape Henlopen School District on Delaware Bay Board of Education will hold a special An oil slick  potted! east of Port Mahon meeting/reception for the Middle States has Coat Guard and private contractors Accreditation.Team at 5:30 p.m., Tuesday, placing protective booms around environ- May 2, at the Lighthouse Restaurant at Youths find trouble Midway area . Four yours were arrested in the Midway Shopping Center area shortly after 1 a.m., April 19. Cpl. Jeff Oldham, state police spokesman, Lsaid a trooper was dispatched to a home on Tiffany Drive in Midway Estates on a public-assist call to try and locate a juvenile runaway. When the trooper arrived, he saw a group of juveniles who had been outside quickly enter the home. Oldham said the trooper knocked on the door several limes and then saw numerous juveniles flee from the rear of the residence. The trooper then entered the home and con- meted Allen M. Willis, 22, of Lewes, a dur- ing a pat-down search discovered W'dlis had : first man was located, another trooper arrived and located a 16?year-old Rehoboth Beach male in the hokpe. " The' youth appeared to have consumd alcohol. He was arrested for underage cnsumption and later turned over to his parents' custody. While the teen was being place in the patrol car, a passerby drove up to the car, and a witness told the trooper there were several teens milling about in the Midway Shopping Center parking lot. A trooper locked the msidence and went to Midway, where he met some youths who were travel- ing in a minivan. Oldham said two of them appeared to have been drinking. Police issued a "criminal summons to David J. McCabe, 18, of Milton, for underage con- brass knuckle:m hisket:: Police arrest: sumption; he was released pending further ed him fo a C0ned . cou. acao. weapon. He wter released on $1,000  Police also issued a criminal summons to unsecured bond.  a 17-year-old male from Tiffany Drive, who Tackle, food stolen from Boat Hole A hungry thief helped himself or herself to a stash of junk food during a burglary at the Boat Hole Bait & Tackle shop on Boat Hole Blvd. between 3 p.m., April 19, and 8 a.m., April 20. Cpl. Jeff Oldham, state police spokesman, said the thief forced entry into the building .nd caused approximately $150 damage to the structure. Once inside,- the thief stole a bag of chips two bottles of coke and 1) Cheyenne meat sticks before loading up with four red Eagle Claw fishing rods, a Ryobi drill, AM/FlVl/CD radio and cash. The total value of the property stolen was $236,90. Police are asking anyone with information to call Det. John Messick at 856-5850, 213. DUI checkpoints scheduled for Cinco de Mayo Cinco de Mayo, Thursday, May 5, is sup- posed to be a celebration of Mexican patti- an excuse to party and consume alcohol. This has result- ed in a deadly trend. Over the past five years, an average of 43 percent of this nation's highway fatalities each year May 5 and into the early morning May 6 were caused by impaired drivers. The Delaware office of Highway Safety is coordinating statewide DUI enforcement for this Cinco de Mayo. The enforcement is part of OHS's ongoing Checkpoint Strikeforce campaign. Delaware State Police to host annual auction The annual Delaware State Police Auction will be Saturday, May 6, at the headquarters facility located adjacent to U.S. 13, north of the Dover Mall. The auction will be held. regardless of weather conditions. The auc- tion will begin promptly at 9 a.m. All prop- erty fvill be available for inspection between 8:30 and 9 a.m. Auctioned items include clothing, bicycles, tools, small ,appliances jewelry. No firearms or vehicles will be sold. Terms-of the sale will be cash or check. At approximately the same time as the was turned over to his parents' custody, otism and pride. For many young adults, All sales will be final. Rehobodl Beach co00nunity restores natural habitat By Rachel Swick Cape Gazette staff More than 30 volunteers worked- over the weekend of April 21 to restore the forested buffer along Futcher Pond in Rehoboth Beach during an Earth Day celebration sponsored by the Pond's Edge community. Located behind the ; Canal Corkran development, the pond munity's open space. Volunteers from the community and the Delawal. Coastal Program planted the trees 'along the expanse of trail leading to the pond. Jimenez said the trees would pro- vide a buffer along the pond that will improve habitat and filter nutrients that flow into the Lewes- Rehoboth Canal. Buffer zones, such as the one created by the vol- has been in need of restoration for unteers at Futcher Pond?help pro- quite some time, said grist, tect'tlae'ater in Sussex County, Jimenez of Guardian Pror :1o(; nking water reservoiis, Management. Jimenez heips'- ( ,Delaw By, she Said, age Pond s Edge Co<./..zones-ptvent pollutants and worked W: ;L:':'g'btting into streams and Department:of'Natural Resourc:s  " reservoirs, filter sediment to Envirortnental Control to plan extend the life of local water sup- te est0ration:( " ::-"rg-up: lies,,ptov.id eriucal slaade and recei,ed the-first open-spffce man- llabit: for: fish and other aluatic agement grit given to anyon in  life,md allow wildlife to moTe Up Sussex Cougty. It used this grat _and:downfsl'eam corridorsl to plant moe than 700 seedlings The Pond 8.Edge volunteers had along the mu)ched trail in the corn- o pr0vde enough sweat equity hours to equal $4,500, which is necessary to meet the require- ments of the matching grnt. The group planted a variety of black oaks, tulip trees, white oaks, loblolly pines and pin oaks along  the pond buffer. It also planted winterberry, highbush blueberry and flowering dogwood shrubs, as well as coastal panic grass, love grass, broomsedge and black-eyed Susans. - The project leaders discussed the rtce of reforestation as aay'Uce noise and air pol- ;.dl water pollution. All of the streams and rivers in Delaware were at olie time dfiguied in dense diduous fost. that stabilized wtersheds :With :buffers;-" said limenez. "Most: recently, increas urban sprawl has destroyed or disturbed these forests in many areas of the state:' ' ": Delaware Environmental Control the Pond's Edge community restore habitat along Futcher Pond Saturday, April 22, in Rehoboth Beach. Shown with Hughes are Carol Boylan, a resident, center, and Lisa Deckert president of the Pond's Edge Homeowlers _btmociation I ""="='='==='B'mn'"mmlll L If Rehoboth streetscape to complete paving Paving for the Rehoboth Avenue Streetscape Improvement Project will be finished Monday, May 5, said Carol Everhart, CEO' and President of the Rehoboth Beach-Dewey Beach Chamber of Commerce. She said crosswalks will be installed and the roadway will be painted over the next two weeks. The new rest- room building will also be painted during this time. Lumber and materials for the new pavilion will be placed on the north side of Rehoboth Avenue, which will require six to eight parking spaces near the restroom building. The area will be blocked off with temporary fencing .... City officials ask that drivers avoid no- parking areas to allow construction workers better access to the worksites. Vehicles in no-parking zones will be towed to the City Hall lot, which is behind the Rehoboth Beach Police Department at 229 Rehoboth Ave. The north side of First Street will also be closed for work on the crosswalk. Uninsured motorists' license plates will be confiscated Insurance Commissioner Matt Denn on Wednesday, April 26, displayed license plates that have been confiscated from cars and trucks without insurance, the start of a new crackdown on uninsured vehicles in Delaware "People without auto insurance are not only shirking one of their responsibilities as drivers; they also cause higher rates for those of us with insurance because the damage they do in accidents must be paid for," said Denn. "That's why I am committed to reducing DENN the number of uninsured vehicles on the road, in part by warning the owners of those uninsured vehicles that we will take their license plates." Under a state law proposed by Denn and approved by the General Assembly and governor in 2005, agents from the Departmott-: f Insurance,s Fraud Prevefititn Behu:are now authorized to  remove license plates from uninsured vehi- CAPE GAZETTE - Tuesday, May 2 - Thursday, May 4, 2006 - 3 Division of Motor Vehicles by insurance between 10 and 100 feet wide and several companies. It is estimated that ll to 14 miles long, said Coast Guard spokesman percent of Delawareans drive without Petty Officer 2nd class John Edwards. He insurance, said in most areas, the oil is a rainbow-col- Owners of vehicles that are uninsured ored sheen with little or no oil concentra- receive advance notice in the mail that their tion. license plate is to be seized and have the However, some baseball-sized concen- chance to provide proof that they have trations were found on the shore near Port obtained insurance for the vehicle. Mahon. Shoreline assessment teams have The department's agents recently began found no impact on the Delaware shoreline, confiscating license plates after spending Edwards said. The Coast Guard is exam- several months working out information- ining the oil in the hopes that they will able sharing procedures with DMV and the to learn where it was refined, and conse- courts and after undergoing required train- quently, the source of the spill. ing. Protective booms were placed at Bombay "In a number of cases so far, vehicle :Hook Wildlife Refuge, and oyster beds on owners have actually purchased insurance the New Jersey side of the bay. Edwards when they received our notice that their tag said private firms Miller Environmental, would be taken," said Denn. "This initia- Clean Ventures Marine and Delaware River tive sends a message that Delaware is seri- and Bay Cooperative have been contracted ous about reducing uninsured vehicles and for the recovery and cleanup operations. hopefully will spur many of those who have ignored the law to get insurance." Cape board to host Off sheen spotted reception Tuesday, May 2 The Cape Henlopen School District on Delaware Bay Board of Education will hold a special An oil slick  potted! east of Port Mahon meeting/reception for the Middle States has Coat Guard and private contractors Accreditation.Team at 5:30 p.m., Tuesday, placing protective booms around environ- May 2, at the Lighthouse Restaurant at Youths find trouble Midway area . Four yours were arrested in the Midway Shopping Center area shortly after 1 a.m., April 19. Cpl. Jeff Oldham, state police spokesman, Lsaid a trooper was dispatched to a home on Tiffany Drive in Midway Estates on a public-assist call to try and locate a juvenile runaway. When the trooper arrived, he saw a group of juveniles who had been outside quickly enter the home. Oldham said the trooper knocked on the door several limes and then saw numerous juveniles flee from the rear of the residence. The trooper then entered the home and con- meted Allen M. Willis, 22, of Lewes, a dur- ing a pat-down search discovered W'dlis had : first man was located, another trooper arrived and located a 16?year-old Rehoboth Beach male in the hokpe. " The' youth appeared to have consumd alcohol. He was arrested for underage cnsumption and later turned over to his parents' custody. While the teen was being place in the patrol car, a passerby drove up to the car, and a witness told the trooper there were several teens milling about in the Midway Shopping Center parking lot. A trooper locked the msidence and went to Midway, where he met some youths who were travel- ing in a minivan. Oldham said two of them appeared to have been drinking. Police issued a "criminal summons to David J. McCabe, 18, of Milton, for underage con- brass knuckle:m hisket:: Police arrest: sumption; he was released pending further ed him fo a C0ned . cou. acao. weapon. He wter released on $1,000  Police also issued a criminal summons to unsecured bond.  a 17-year-old male from Tiffany Drive, who Tackle, food stolen from Boat Hole A hungry thief helped himself or herself to a stash of junk food during a burglary at the Boat Hole Bait & Tackle shop on Boat Hole Blvd. between 3 p.m., April 19, and 8 a.m., April 20. Cpl. Jeff Oldham, state police spokesman, said the thief forced entry into the building .nd caused approximately $150 damage to the structure. Once inside,- the thief stole a bag of chips two bottles of coke and 1) Cheyenne meat sticks before loading up with four red Eagle Claw fishing rods, a Ryobi drill, AM/FlVl/CD radio and cash. The total value of the property stolen was $236,90. Police are asking anyone with information to call Det. John Messick at 856-5850, 213. DUI checkpoints scheduled for Cinco de Mayo Cinco de Mayo, Thursday, May 5, is sup- posed to be a celebration of Mexican patti- an excuse to party and consume alcohol. This has result- ed in a deadly trend. Over the past five years, an average of 43 percent of this nation's highway fatalities each year May 5 and into the early morning May 6 were caused by impaired drivers. The Delaware office of Highway Safety is coordinating statewide DUI enforcement for this Cinco de Mayo. The enforcement is part of OHS's ongoing Checkpoint Strikeforce campaign. Delaware State Police to host annual auction The annual Delaware State Police Auction will be Saturday, May 6, at the headquarters facility located adjacent to U.S. 13, north of the Dover Mall. The auction will be held. regardless of weather conditions. The auc- tion will begin promptly at 9 a.m. All prop- erty fvill be available for inspection between 8:30 and 9 a.m. Auctioned items include clothing, bicycles, tools, small ,appliances jewelry. No firearms or vehicles will be sold. Terms-of the sale will be cash or check. At approximately the same time as the was turned over to his parents' custody, otism and pride. For many young adults, All sales will be final. Rehobodl Beach co00nunity restores natural habitat By Rachel Swick Cape Gazette staff More than 30 volunteers worked- over the weekend of April 21 to restore the forested buffer along Futcher Pond in Rehoboth Beach during an Earth Day celebration sponsored by the Pond's Edge community. Located behind the ; Canal Corkran development, the pond munity's open space. Volunteers from the community and the Delawal. Coastal Program planted the trees 'along the expanse of trail leading to the pond. Jimenez said the trees would pro- vide a buffer along the pond that will improve habitat and filter nutrients that flow into the Lewes- Rehoboth Canal. Buffer zones, such as the one created by the vol- has been in need of restoration for unteers at Futcher Pond?help pro- quite some time, said grist, tect'tlae'ater in Sussex County, Jimenez of Guardian Pror :1o(; nking water reservoiis, Management. Jimenez heips'- ( ,Delaw By, she Said, age Pond s Edge Co<./..zones-ptvent pollutants and worked W: ;L:':'g'btting into streams and Department:of'Natural Resourc:s  " reservoirs, filter sediment to Envirortnental Control to plan extend the life of local water sup- te est0ration:( " ::-"rg-up: lies,,ptov.id eriucal slaade and recei,ed the-first open-spffce man- llabit: for: fish and other aluatic agement grit given to anyon in  life,md allow wildlife to moTe Up Sussex Cougty. It used this grat _and:downfsl'eam corridorsl to plant moe than 700 seedlings The Pond 8.Edge volunteers had along the mu)ched trail in the corn- o pr0vde enough sweat equity hours to equal $4,500, which is necessary to meet the require- ments of the matching grnt. The group planted a variety of black oaks, tulip trees, white oaks, loblolly pines and pin oaks along  the pond buffer. It also planted winterberry, highbush blueberry and flowering dogwood shrubs, as well as coastal panic grass, love grass, broomsedge and black-eyed Susans. - The project leaders discussed the rtce of reforestation as aay'Uce noise and air pol- ;.dl water pollution. All of the streams and rivers in Delaware were at olie time dfiguied in dense diduous fost. that stabilized wtersheds :With :buffers;-" said limenez. "Most: recently, increas urban sprawl has destroyed or disturbed these forests in many areas of the state:' ' ": Delaware Environmental Control the Pond's Edge community restore habitat along Futcher Pond Saturday, April 22, in Rehoboth Beach. Shown with Hughes are Carol Boylan, a resident, center, and Lisa Deckert president of the Pond's Edge Homeowlers _btmociation