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Lewes, Delaware
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May 2, 2006     Cape Gazette
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Dela00'are Cape Region histor) ill photo00;raphs Letters Continued from page 6 We as a community should have the opportunity to cast away the noted perception of impropri- ety, guarantee fair elections and then begin to truly make Cape great. John Bitter Rehoboth Beach Reader takes Cape superintendent to task The following letter was sent to Cape Henlopen School District superintendent Dr. George Stone, with a copy submitted to the Cape Gazette for publication. This is in regard to your letter responding to my letter in the April 24 edition of the Cape Gazette. I fail to see the relevance in you pointing out that you are "an edu- cator, not a politician." Whatever you are, you should have the wherewithal to know that if you do not want to be accountable to the taxpayers, you should stop cashing your paychecks. Conversely, if you continue to cash your paychecks, you are obligated to succin't accountabil- ity, which thus far has proven to be ambiguous and disingenuous at best. I agree that "it is unfortunate that you do not have more time to establish and implement educa- -tional programs." However, you must know that dogmatic duplici- ty and vacillating are not conclu- sive to time management. In other words, you made your bed, as did the board members. Cape to Great cannot be achieved under the direction of current administra- tors, officials and the like, without them first cleaning up the mess they created. The voters voted themselves a tax increase to meet the educational development of our children. However, that vote does not equivocate to handing over millions of dollars to a group of individuals that have proven to be untrustworthy. Lastly, you mention that you will continue to serve Cape's stu- dents by giving them "100 per- cent" of your energy. If recent months are indicative of your 100 percent, you might consider dial- ing back the percentage of energy you are giving our students. They might not be able to withstand your 100 percent long-term. Your time and attention are appreciated. Lisa Moore Lewes Coastal Concerts- thanks community Coastal Concerts recently pre- sented Zin, Zin, Zin a Violin, a musical story time, at the Milton Library and extends thanks to all those who participated in present- ing this educational program. Thanks to Pat Batten, Milton Library; . Barry Eli, Cape Henlopen High School band director; Elizabeth Brown, Delaware Music School acting director; and Roo Brown, Henlopen Theater Project, who read the story. Also thanks to Cape Henlopen Class of 2008 musicians Victoria Affimow, flute; Cody Leavel, clarinet; Jessica Shifflett, trumpet; Lisa Moy, class of 2003, trombone; and to Delaware Music School student, Sara Gavin, violinist. Jon Woodyard, Coastal Concerts Outreach Committee, scheduled and directed rehearsals and played the French horn. CC is proud of its outreach work in the communi- ty and is grateful to all those who help make it possible. Coastal Concerts Community Outreach Committee Dolores Fiegel, Chair Thanks from Daffodil Days group Sussex County was blanketed in yellow during the American Cancer Society's Daffodil Days campaign March 13-19. Our heartfelt thanks go out to every- one who participated in the 2006 CAPE GAZE'IWE - Tuesday, May 2 - Thursday, May 4, 2006 - 7 Delaware Public Archives photo From the mid-20th century in Rehoboth Beach In the 19fs, the Hotel Henlopen at the north end of the Boardwalk was the belle of Rehoboth's hotels with its graceful architecture and premier location overlooking the Atlantic Ocean and Lake Gerar. With its color-coordinated beach umbrellas and chairs, and full-service restaurant and snack bar, the Henlopen served as its own beach club. This struc- ture was badly damaged by the March storm of 1962, leading eventually to its total demoli- tion and replacement with the present structure. American Cancer Society Daffodil Days project. As the first flower of spring, the daffodil symbolizes hope and rebirth, and through its Daffodil Days program and your support, the American Cancer Society is able to bring that hope to every. one affected by cancer. Since it was founded in 1913, the American Cancer Society has had the same mission of eliminat- ing cancer as a major health prob- lem. The funds raised by Daffodil Days over the past 33 years have helped in this mission of prevent- ing cancer, saving lives, and diminishing suffering from the disease through research, educa- tion, advocacy, and patient servic- es. Since 1946, the American Cancer Society has funded more than $2.8 billion in cancer research. The Society also strives to educate the public in order to prevent cancer and catch it early through programs, as well as advocating for laws that will help eliminate cancer and make the cancer experience less burden- some for patients and their fami- lies. In Sussex County patient serv- ice programs such as Look Good, Feel Better, Reach to Recovery, Man to Man and Hope Lodge are allowing those affected by cancer a better quality of life. The funds raised also allow access to cancer information and services 24 hours a day, seven days a week, through the American Cancer Society's National Cancer Information Center at 800-ACS-2345 or by visiting www.cancer.org. We would like to thank the organizing committees from both sides of the county for their dedi- cation to the mission of the American Cancer Society. Your efforts leading up to and during American Cancer Society Continued on page 8 Endowment gifts keep on giving Forever is a concept most of us have difficulty grasping, especial- ly as it relates to our own actions. Is it possible that a decision we make today will have an impact on generations yet to be born? How can we understand the meaning of permanent, lasting and enduring? As we celebrate the 300th anniversary of the birth of Benjamin Franklin this year and reflect on his contributionsto society, it's a bit easier to appreci- ate the concept of forever. Franklin's financial success aSra publisher allowed him to become a philanthropist and establsh institutions that endure today - a university, a hospital, a libmu, a militia, a postal service, a fire- .  throughout our country to create a meet future needs. One of the permanent source of funding to Delaware Community improve the communities they Foundation's earliest "investors" serve and provide opportunities was the State of Delaware. In for people to have a better life. 1989, the Foundation requested The Delaware Community and received $2 million from the Foundation (DCF), started in General Assembly to be held as a 1986, has been responding to the permanent unrestricted endow- needs of Delaware's communi- ment, with the principal invested ties, as they emerge and change and the income used to provide over time, for almost 20 years, capital grants to nonprofit organi- By encouraging individuals, fam- zations. flies, businesses and organizations When he signed the bill, Gov. COMMENTARY to create endowment funds at the Michael N. Castle predicted that DCF, the foundation has succeed- the $2 million investment would ed in building forever into "grow tremendously as the form- Hugh Leahy Jr. Delaware's charitable future.  -dation exPOs and a perpetually An endowment fund is perma- larger .stream of income flows community and to provideoPlXg - nent - the initial investment that back. to Kent, Sussex and New tunities for people m help them- creates the fund, along with the " Castle counties." Governor selves, gifts that are tMldnd.ovet the years, Castle clearly understood the fighlieompany,afireinsimu Since i914; fmm: walWaysbeatecommtmi.-implicationsofagiftofmxlow- Fund, created at the DCF With the $2 million state grant, has award- ed 257 grants totaling over $2.4 million to Delaware nonprofits - yet still has a balance of more than $3.2 million that remains fully invested. Another early source of endow- ment for the DCF was the consol- idation and transfer of 28 charita- ble trusts from Wilmington Trust and Bank of Delaware to the foundation. Included were trusts that had been established by the late Daniel and lee Hirsch of Milford, resulting in slx separate charitable funds at the DCF that will forever benefit the people of Milford. Beneficiaries of regular distributions from the funds are the Milford Pablic Library, Bayhealth Medical Center, ,.msm00 m tm008 : . -f . = - : ' Dela00'are Cape Region histor) ill photo00;raphs Letters Continued from page 6 We as a community should have the opportunity to cast away the noted perception of impropri- ety, guarantee fair elections and then begin to truly make Cape great. John Bitter Rehoboth Beach Reader takes Cape superintendent to task The following letter was sent to Cape Henlopen School District superintendent Dr. George Stone, with a copy submitted to the Cape Gazette for publication. This is in regard to your letter responding to my letter in the April 24 edition of the Cape Gazette. I fail to see the relevance in you pointing out that you are "an edu- cator, not a politician." Whatever you are, you should have the wherewithal to know that if you do not want to be accountable to the taxpayers, you should stop cashing your paychecks. Conversely, if you continue to cash your paychecks, you are obligated to succin't accountabil- ity, which thus far has proven to be ambiguous and disingenuous at best. I agree that "it is unfortunate that you do not have more time to establish and implement educa- -tional programs." However, you must know that dogmatic duplici- ty and vacillating are not conclu- sive to time management. In other words, you made your bed, as did the board members. Cape to Great cannot be achieved under the direction of current administra- tors, officials and the like, without them first cleaning up the mess they created. The voters voted themselves a tax increase to meet the educational development of our children. However, that vote does not equivocate to handing over millions of dollars to a group of individuals that have proven to be untrustworthy. Lastly, you mention that you will continue to serve Cape's stu- dents by giving them "100 per- cent" of your energy. If recent months are indicative of your 100 percent, you might consider dial- ing back the percentage of energy you are giving our students. They might not be able to withstand your 100 percent long-term. Your time and attention are appreciated. Lisa Moore Lewes Coastal Concerts- thanks community Coastal Concerts recently pre- sented Zin, Zin, Zin a Violin, a musical story time, at the Milton Library and extends thanks to all those who participated in present- ing this educational program. Thanks to Pat Batten, Milton Library; . Barry Eli, Cape Henlopen High School band director; Elizabeth Brown, Delaware Music School acting director; and Roo Brown, Henlopen Theater Project, who read the story. Also thanks to Cape Henlopen Class of 2008 musicians Victoria Affimow, flute; Cody Leavel, clarinet; Jessica Shifflett, trumpet; Lisa Moy, class of 2003, trombone; and to Delaware Music School student, Sara Gavin, violinist. Jon Woodyard, Coastal Concerts Outreach Committee, scheduled and directed rehearsals and played the French horn. CC is proud of its outreach work in the communi- ty and is grateful to all those who help make it possible. Coastal Concerts Community Outreach Committee Dolores Fiegel, Chair Thanks from Daffodil Days group Sussex County was blanketed in yellow during the American Cancer Society's Daffodil Days campaign March 13-19. Our heartfelt thanks go out to every- one who participated in the 2006 CAPE GAZE'IWE - Tuesday, May 2 - Thursday, May 4, 2006 - 7 Delaware Public Archives photo From the mid-20th century in Rehoboth Beach In the 19fs, the Hotel Henlopen at the north end of the Boardwalk was the belle of Rehoboth's hotels with its graceful architecture and premier location overlooking the Atlantic Ocean and Lake Gerar. With its color-coordinated beach umbrellas and chairs, and full-service restaurant and snack bar, the Henlopen served as its own beach club. This struc- ture was badly damaged by the March storm of 1962, leading eventually to its total demoli- tion and replacement with the present structure. American Cancer Society Daffodil Days project. As the first flower of spring, the daffodil symbolizes hope and rebirth, and through its Daffodil Days program and your support, the American Cancer Society is able to bring that hope to every. one affected by cancer. Since it was founded in 1913, the American Cancer Society has had the same mission of eliminat- ing cancer as a major health prob- lem. The funds raised by Daffodil Days over the past 33 years have helped in this mission of prevent- ing cancer, saving lives, and diminishing suffering from the disease through research, educa- tion, advocacy, and patient servic- es. Since 1946, the American Cancer Society has funded more than $2.8 billion in cancer research. The Society also strives to educate the public in order to prevent cancer and catch it early through programs, as well as advocating for laws that will help eliminate cancer and make the cancer experience less burden- some for patients and their fami- lies. In Sussex County patient serv- ice programs such as Look Good, Feel Better, Reach to Recovery, Man to Man and Hope Lodge are allowing those affected by cancer a better quality of life. The funds raised also allow access to cancer information and services 24 hours a day, seven days a week, through the American Cancer Society's National Cancer Information Center at 800-ACS-2345 or by visiting www.cancer.org. We would like to thank the organizing committees from both sides of the county for their dedi- cation to the mission of the American Cancer Society. Your efforts leading up to and during American Cancer Society Continued on page 8 Endowment gifts keep on giving Forever is a concept most of us have difficulty grasping, especial- ly as it relates to our own actions. Is it possible that a decision we make today will have an impact on generations yet to be born? How can we understand the meaning of permanent, lasting and enduring? As we celebrate the 300th anniversary of the birth of Benjamin Franklin this year and reflect on his contributionsto society, it's a bit easier to appreci- ate the concept of forever. Franklin's financial success aSra publisher allowed him to become a philanthropist and establsh institutions that endure today - a university, a hospital, a libmu, a militia, a postal service, a fire- .  throughout our country to create a meet future needs. One of the permanent source of funding to Delaware Community improve the communities they Foundation's earliest "investors" serve and provide opportunities was the State of Delaware. In for people to have a better life. 1989, the Foundation requested The Delaware Community and received $2 million from the Foundation (DCF), started in General Assembly to be held as a 1986, has been responding to the permanent unrestricted endow- needs of Delaware's communi- ment, with the principal invested ties, as they emerge and change and the income used to provide over time, for almost 20 years, capital grants to nonprofit organi- By encouraging individuals, fam- zations. flies, businesses and organizations When he signed the bill, Gov. COMMENTARY to create endowment funds at the Michael N. Castle predicted that DCF, the foundation has succeed- the $2 million investment would ed in building forever into "grow tremendously as the form- Hugh Leahy Jr. Delaware's charitable future.  -dation exPOs and a perpetually An endowment fund is perma- larger .stream of income flows community and to provideoPlXg - nent - the initial investment that back. to Kent, Sussex and New tunities for people m help them- creates the fund, along with the " Castle counties." Governor selves, gifts that are tMldnd.ovet the years, Castle clearly understood the fighlieompany,afireinsimu Since i914; fmm: walWaysbeatecommtmi.-implicationsofagiftofmxlow- Fund, created at the DCF With the $2 million state grant, has award- ed 257 grants totaling over $2.4 million to Delaware nonprofits - yet still has a balance of more than $3.2 million that remains fully invested. Another early source of endow- ment for the DCF was the consol- idation and transfer of 28 charita- ble trusts from Wilmington Trust and Bank of Delaware to the foundation. Included were trusts that had been established by the late Daniel and lee Hirsch of Milford, resulting in slx separate charitable funds at the DCF that will forever benefit the people of Milford. Beneficiaries of regular distributions from the funds are the Milford Pablic Library, Bayhealth Medical Center, ,.msm00 m tm008 : . -f . = - : '