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May 2, 2006     Cape Gazette
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18 - CAPE GAZETTE - Tuesday, May 2 - Thursday, May 4, 2006 Jim Westhoff photo These boots were made for walkin' Jakob and Tamar Teitelbaum of Montreal began their walking journey across the United States Wednesday, April 26, at Cape Henlopen State Park. Days earlier, the couple graduated from McGill University in Montreal and thought this was the perfect time to hike the American Discovery Trail. Asked why they didn't hike across Canada, Tamar said, "It's bigger and colder." Jakob said they also believe the United States will be more culturally and geographically diverse, To see the Teitelbaum's chronicle of their journey, visit www.walkacrosstheus.com. MacElrevey Continued from page 16 Before the pilot can even start to drive the ship, he or she must first get on board. "The most hazardous part is getting on and off," MacElrevey said. Even in rough seas, the pilot has to step from a relatively small shuttlecraft to a ship that is hun- dreds of feet long, each moving differently with the waves. "You get some really snotty weather sometimes," he said. But he said the people and the equip- ment are capable enough to han- dle just about any weather situa- tion. "But if the weather is too bad, they tell the ships to go back to sea and wait for things to calm doyen," he said. But that is rare. "We were only off station twice since '94, and that was for about 12 hours each time." Apparently, pilots don't scare easily. "I've boarded ships in 70 knot winds," he said. "As long as the ship is able to provide a safe lee for you, it's not that bad." In rough seas, before the pilot tries to come aboard, they will ask the ship to turn hard in one direction or the other. When the ship drastically changes course, it slides sideways a bit, calming the water on the inside of the slide. The pilot uses that window of opportunity to step on board the ship. But the challenge is far from over. As a pilot, MacElrevey has to drive the ship up a rather nar- row channel through heavily pop- ulated areas. "An older pilot once told me that being a pilot is not knowing where the channel is, but know- ing where you can leave the chan- nel," he said. But not every ship handles the same. "You rely on your experi- ence," he said. "A small fruit ship handles like a Maserati, but a fully loaded tanker handles like a semi." MacElrevey said he makes a few minor course changes right away to give him an idea of how the ship handles. In direct contrast to the techni- cally sophisticated job of driving supertankers up the Delaware Bay, MacElrevey's hobby is per- haps the Simplest of all sports. The running man He ran in the Boston Marathon on April 17. Running since col- lege, he was able to qualify for the Boston race by finishing well at the Philadelphia marathon. He trains at Cape Henlopen State Park, running up and down the dunes to prepare for Boston, but he was disappointed in his time, 3 hours and 26 minutes. "It was a really hilly course," said the flatlander from Delaware. MacElrevey is also a frequent competitor in the Seashore Strider running series. "I enjoy running because when I run, I'm alone with my thoughts," he said. "What motivates me the most is having some event to train for," he said. "I like the challenge - I like that it's hard." To train for Boston, he has been running up any hills he can find: "I've been running in [Cape Healopen State Park] a lot," he said. "I run up the sand dunes, and up and down the same hills," he said. Which could be an apt metaphor for his life. Rather than avoiding inclines, he seeks out any hills he can find and charges straight up. He then turns around and runs up again and again. American Red Cross assists Millsboro family after devastating house fire An adult and three children were luckily not at home when fire broke out and subsequently destroyed their home on Doc Frame Rd, Millsboro April 25. The family pets also escaped the fire. The American Red Cross of the Delmarva Peninsula dispatched two disaster responders at approximately 11 a.m., to meet with the family, and a guest who was staying at the home, and assist with their emergency reeds. Red Cross assisted the fam- ily and the visitor with their immediate housing, clothing, and food needs along with storage contain- ers and comfort kits. They were also given informa- tion to assist in their recovery from this disaster. The American Red Cross of the Delmarva Peninsula provides emergency assistance for those affected by all kinds of disasters, from home fires to floods and other major catastrophes, free of charge, according to their needs. This disaster relief usually consists of food, cloth- ing, temporary accommodation and a recovery guide, as well as referral to other community agen- cies for help with longer-term needs. Where mental health services are needed, trained Red Cross volun- teers are available to help. There has been a recent spate of fires affecting families throughout Delaware and the eastern shore of Maryland, to which volunteers from the American Red Cross of the Delmarva Peninsula have respond- ed and provided much needed disaster relief. All American Red Cross disaster assistance is free, made possible by voluntary donations of time and money from the American people. To help local families whose lives are devastated by fires, floods and hundreds of other disasters across the communi- ty each year, make a financial gift to the American Red Cross of the Delmarva Peninsula. This enables the Red Cross to provide shelter, food, counseling and other assistance to those in need in the state of Delaware and Caroline, Cecil, Dorchester, Kent, Queen Anne's and Talbot counties in Maryland., To help the Victims of this and Other local disas- ters, contributions may be made by mail to the American Red Cross of the Delmarva-Peninsula, P. O. Box 831, Wilmington, DE 19899-0831 or by calling 800-777-6620 during office hours. Internet users can make a secure online contribution by vis: iting www.redcrossdelmarva.org. For fire safety tips and ideas on how to stay safe, visit www.redcrossdelmarva.org/staysafe.html. Free parenting classes offered locally Child Inc. will offer a free parenting class from 6 to 8 p.m., Wednesdays from May 17 through June 28 at the Georgetown State Service Center. The classes will include topics such as parent/child com- munication, problem solving, decision making, stress in the family and building self-esteem. For more information or to register, call 302-228- 9943 or visit www.childinc.com.  With these rates, your money works as hard as you do. And when you maintain $2,500 in your CD, you'll receive free Custom Checking, with free online Bill Pay. 302.436.8236 410.651.2400 757.787.4111 or vi'sit us online at mercantilepeninsulabank'com MERCANTILE PENINSULA BANK WE'RE BANKING ON YOU. *lhe An Perceot Y'mld is ctcret as of 4/26K)6 and subject to change at any Ume. "lhe 13-rnonth CO has a $1,000 m,m ope deposit. Penalty impo for eady wiltxlrawaL ' Mercantile I A family of community banks serving Maryland, Washington, D.C., Virginia, Delaware and Pennsy}wania I Member FDIC I Equal Housing Lender i / 18 - CAPE GAZETTE - Tuesday, May 2 - Thursday, May 4, 2006 Jim Westhoff photo These boots were made for walkin' Jakob and Tamar Teitelbaum of Montreal began their walking journey across the United States Wednesday, April 26, at Cape Henlopen State Park. Days earlier, the couple graduated from McGill University in Montreal and thought this was the perfect time to hike the American Discovery Trail. Asked why they didn't hike across Canada, Tamar said, "It's bigger and colder." Jakob said they also believe the United States will be more culturally and geographically diverse, To see the Teitelbaum's chronicle of their journey, visit www.walkacrosstheus.com. MacElrevey Continued from page 16 Before the pilot can even start to drive the ship, he or she must first get on board. "The most hazardous part is getting on and off," MacElrevey said. Even in rough seas, the pilot has to step from a relatively small shuttlecraft to a ship that is hun- dreds of feet long, each moving differently with the waves. "You get some really snotty weather sometimes," he said. But he said the people and the equip- ment are capable enough to han- dle just about any weather situa- tion. "But if the weather is too bad, they tell the ships to go back to sea and wait for things to calm doyen," he said. But that is rare. "We were only off station twice since '94, and that was for about 12 hours each time." Apparently, pilots don't scare easily. "I've boarded ships in 70 knot winds," he said. "As long as the ship is able to provide a safe lee for you, it's not that bad." In rough seas, before the pilot tries to come aboard, they will ask the ship to turn hard in one direction or the other. When the ship drastically changes course, it slides sideways a bit, calming the water on the inside of the slide. The pilot uses that window of opportunity to step on board the ship. But the challenge is far from over. As a pilot, MacElrevey has to drive the ship up a rather nar- row channel through heavily pop- ulated areas. "An older pilot once told me that being a pilot is not knowing where the channel is, but know- ing where you can leave the chan- nel," he said. But not every ship handles the same. "You rely on your experi- ence," he said. "A small fruit ship handles like a Maserati, but a fully loaded tanker handles like a semi." MacElrevey said he makes a few minor course changes right away to give him an idea of how the ship handles. In direct contrast to the techni- cally sophisticated job of driving supertankers up the Delaware Bay, MacElrevey's hobby is per- haps the Simplest of all sports. The running man He ran in the Boston Marathon on April 17. Running since col- lege, he was able to qualify for the Boston race by finishing well at the Philadelphia marathon. He trains at Cape Henlopen State Park, running up and down the dunes to prepare for Boston, but he was disappointed in his time, 3 hours and 26 minutes. "It was a really hilly course," said the flatlander from Delaware. MacElrevey is also a frequent competitor in the Seashore Strider running series. "I enjoy running because when I run, I'm alone with my thoughts," he said. "What motivates me the most is having some event to train for," he said. "I like the challenge - I like that it's hard." To train for Boston, he has been running up any hills he can find: "I've been running in [Cape Healopen State Park] a lot," he said. "I run up the sand dunes, and up and down the same hills," he said. Which could be an apt metaphor for his life. Rather than avoiding inclines, he seeks out any hills he can find and charges straight up. He then turns around and runs up again and again. American Red Cross assists Millsboro family after devastating house fire An adult and three children were luckily not at home when fire broke out and subsequently destroyed their home on Doc Frame Rd, Millsboro April 25. The family pets also escaped the fire. The American Red Cross of the Delmarva Peninsula dispatched two disaster responders at approximately 11 a.m., to meet with the family, and a guest who was staying at the home, and assist with their emergency reeds. Red Cross assisted the fam- ily and the visitor with their immediate housing, clothing, and food needs along with storage contain- ers and comfort kits. They were also given informa- tion to assist in their recovery from this disaster. The American Red Cross of the Delmarva Peninsula provides emergency assistance for those affected by all kinds of disasters, from home fires to floods and other major catastrophes, free of charge, according to their needs. This disaster relief usually consists of food, cloth- ing, temporary accommodation and a recovery guide, as well as referral to other community agen- cies for help with longer-term needs. Where mental health services are needed, trained Red Cross volun- teers are available to help. There has been a recent spate of fires affecting families throughout Delaware and the eastern shore of Maryland, to which volunteers from the American Red Cross of the Delmarva Peninsula have respond- ed and provided much needed disaster relief. All American Red Cross disaster assistance is free, made possible by voluntary donations of time and money from the American people. To help local families whose lives are devastated by fires, floods and hundreds of other disasters across the communi- ty each year, make a financial gift to the American Red Cross of the Delmarva Peninsula. This enables the Red Cross to provide shelter, food, counseling and other assistance to those in need in the state of Delaware and Caroline, Cecil, Dorchester, Kent, Queen Anne's and Talbot counties in Maryland., To help the Victims of this and Other local disas- ters, contributions may be made by mail to the American Red Cross of the Delmarva-Peninsula, P. O. Box 831, Wilmington, DE 19899-0831 or by calling 800-777-6620 during office hours. Internet users can make a secure online contribution by vis: iting www.redcrossdelmarva.org. For fire safety tips and ideas on how to stay safe, visit www.redcrossdelmarva.org/staysafe.html. Free parenting classes offered locally Child Inc. will offer a free parenting class from 6 to 8 p.m., Wednesdays from May 17 through June 28 at the Georgetown State Service Center. The classes will include topics such as parent/child com- munication, problem solving, decision making, stress in the family and building self-esteem. For more information or to register, call 302-228- 9943 or visit www.childinc.com.  With these rates, your money works as hard as you do. And when you maintain $2,500 in your CD, you'll receive free Custom Checking, with free online Bill Pay. 302.436.8236 410.651.2400 757.787.4111 or vi'sit us online at mercantilepeninsulabank'com MERCANTILE PENINSULA BANK WE'RE BANKING ON YOU. *lhe An Perceot Y'mld is ctcret as of 4/26K)6 and subject to change at any Ume. "lhe 13-rnonth CO has a $1,000 m,m ope deposit. Penalty impo for eady wiltxlrawaL ' Mercantile I A family of community banks serving Maryland, Washington, D.C., Virginia, Delaware and Pennsy}wania I Member FDIC I Equal Housing Lender i /