Newspaper Archive of
Cape Gazette
Lewes, Delaware
Jim's Towing Service
May 23, 1997     Cape Gazette
PAGE 60     (60 of 96 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 60     (60 of 96 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
May 23, 1997
 

Newspaper Archive of Cape Gazette produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




60 - CAPE GAZE3"I'E, Friday, May 23 - May 29, 1997 Teens need calcium to reduce the risk of disease "Drink your milk for strong bones and teeth." Generations of American chil- dren have grown up hearing this advice. But today, many teens are choosing a can of soda instead of a glass of milk, forfeiting a major source of dietary calcium and in- creasing their risk for the crip- pling "brittle bone" disease, osteo- porosis. "The teenage years are a crucial time in building bone mass," said Sue Snider, cooperative Extension food and nutrition specialist at the university of Delaware. "Since teenagers are forming nearly half of their adult bone mass, .they need to eat calcium rich foods." But studies show that most American teenagers are not meet- ing the recommended daily al- lowance (RDA) of calcium. Ac- cording to a recent survey by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, only 35 percent of boys and 14 percent of girls are getting the 1,200 milligrams they need. Milk, a major source of calci- um, has lost popularity among teenagers in the last 20 years. While soft drink consumption has risen, nearly tripling among teenage boys since the late 1970s. milk consumption has dropped. On average, adolescent boys drink only about one and a quarter cups of milk per day, while girls drink less than a cup. The U.S.D.A. recommends drinking two to three cups a day. The consequence of low calci- um intake may not show up im- mediately, but when they do, they can be devastating. One out of every eight men and one out of every two women will develop os- teoporosis, with fair skinned women of Northern European de- scent being most susceptible. The bone thinning disease can weaken the skeleton so much that even a sneeze can make a bone break. "Without calcium, it's nearly impossible to build strong, dense bones," Snider said. "And calcium not only defends the body against osteoporosis, but may also help to protect against high blood pres- sure and colon cancer." How then, should growing teenagers get the calcium they need? "Drinking milk is probably the easiest way to meet calcium re- quirements," Snider said. "Three glasses of milk meets three quar- ters of a teenager's daily calcium needs. And most milk sold in the United States is fortified with vit- amin D, which is essential for cal- cium absorption." Although milk and other dairy products are the main source of calcium for Americans, other foods can also contribute signifi- cant amounts of this essential ele- ment. Dark green, leafy vegeta- bles, fish with edible bones such as sardines and canned salmon, dried beans, tofu processed with calcium sulfate and enriched or fortified breads and cereals all provide calcium. Studies indicate that calcium is as equally well-absorbed from supplements as from foods and a variety of supplements are avail- able on the market. Calcium car- bonate contains the most (forty percent by weight) calcium. Most experts recommend taking supple- ments with meals to enhance cal- cium absorption. Snider cautions, however, that supplements should not be substi- tuted for food. No supplement en- sures the variety and amounts of nutrients and energy that a well- balanced diet provides. And eat- ing a variety of foods also lessens the likelihood of nutrient imbal- ances, which supplements can cause. By following the USDA's Food Pyramid Guidelines, teens can get the nutrients they need to build healthy, strong bones. The following foods contain about the same amount of calcium (300 mg.) as an 8-ounce cup of milk. One and a half ounces cheddar cheese. Delaware hot sauce wins national award McNeilL Inc., a Delaware-based hot sauce, salsa and seasoning man- ufacturer, won third place in the Food Distribution Magazine's Nation- al Salsa and Hot Sauce Shoot-Out Packaging Category for their entry, "Final Experiment." The Salsa and Hot Sauce Shoot-Out is a national competition for fiery food products. The competition attracted over 420 entries from 93 different manufacturers. The unique packaging for Fi- nal Experiment, conceptualized by Susan McNeill of Wilmington, con- sists of two real laboratory test tubes. The Shoot-Out was judged by a panel of over 150 judges. King's Continued from page 59 out of a flavor. But there is always plenty of ice cream of one kind or another. "We've got it under control so we don't run out," he said. "Sometimes we run back and forth to Milton where the ice cream is made." The established reputation and stack of awards has brought some inquiries about franchising King's Ice Cream, but Tom finds the size and pace of Milton and Lewes right for now. He said that his cus- tomers are friendly, and their easy-going attitude adds to the perception that the business hasn't changed much over 25 years. "They see their friends here," he said. "Even when the line goes out the door, no one seems to mind. They talk to the people sitting on the porch, it's even a social expe- rience to wait in line. "People are in a good mood when they come to get ice cream. It's not like paying taxes." One and a half slices processed cheese. Two cups cottage cheese. One cup yogurt One and a half cups ice cream or ice milk. Eight ounces tofu. Two cups broccoli. One cup collard or turnip greens. One and a half cups kale or mustard greens. Four ounces canned salmon with bones. Two and a half ounces canned sardines with bones. One and a half cups (about 16) medium oysters. Two slices calcium-fortified bread. One and a quarter cups calcium- fortified cereal. Eight ounces calcium-fortified orange juice. Four cups kidney beans, cooked. LEWES FISHHOUSE & PRODUCE COLD BEER SPECIALS 30PACKS BUDWEISER, BUD ICE, BUD UGHT .......... 13.99 COORS, COORS UGHT .................... 13.99 MILLER MTE, ICE, GEN. DRAFT ............. 12.99 MILLER HI-UFE, RED DOG ................. 10.99 COORS EXTRA GOLD ...................... 11.69 BUSCH, BUSCH LIGHT .................... 11.99 24 PACKS MICHELOB/MGHT ........................ 13.99 MOLSON ICE/GOLDEN .................... 13.99 LABAn" BLUE ........................... 12.99 ROLLING ROCK .......................... 11.99 SCHLITZ, UGHT, ICE ....................... 7.79 MILWAUKEE BEST ........................ 6.99 VOOKA POPOV ........... 10.49 GORDONS ........ 10.49 GILBEY'S ......... 10.49 i BURNEn.S ....... 10.99 STOU ............ 23.99 LIQUOR SPECIALS 1.75L CANADIAN CANADIAN MIST...10.99 LORD CALVERT ...11.99 WINDSOR ........ 11.99 CANADIAN LEAF . .11.99 BLACK VELVET ...11.99 BOURBON OLD CROW ....... 13.99 KENTUCKY GENT..12.99 JIM BEAM ........ 17.99 JACK DANIELS .... 27.99 JACK DANIELS C/S0) .13.99 RUM MCCORMICK ...... 11.49 BACARDI ......... 14.99 BACARDI (750) .... 8.99 CAPT. MORGAN ...17.99 MAUBU .......... 23.99 WINE, SPECIAL VALUE ] 5L FRANZlA BOX .......... 8.99 4L CARLO ROSSI ........... 8.49 1.5L INGLENOOK EST. ......... 6.99 I 5LE.IIDWNEBOX ........ 8.99 3L LIVINGSTON CELARS ..... 7.79 750 BERRINGERS WHITE ZlN...4.99 I (EXCEPT WHITE ZIN) 8L CAMFORNIA CELLARS .. 3.49 750 SlJTTER HOME W. 2IN - 3 FOR 11.99 J CHOOSE FROM OUR CABERNEr SAUVRION DUBOEUF 1994R5 ............. 5.99 GLEN ELLEN 1993 ............. 6.49 M.G. WALLEJO 1994 ............ 6.99 CAVIT TRENT1NO 1993 ......... 7.49 LOS VASCOS 1994 ............. 6.49 TURNING LEAF 1994 ........... 6.99 CEDAR BROOK 1994 ........... 7.99 HAYWOOD 1994 ............... 7.99 WOODBRIDGE 1994 ............ 7.99 BOGLE 1994 .................. 8.49 HESS SELECT 1994 ............ 9.99 CLOS DU BOIS 1994 ........... 11;99 KENDALL JACKSON 1993 ...... 13.99 BERINGER 1992 .............. 15.99 PENFOLDS 1993 .............. 15.99 HEITZ CELLARS 1991 ......... 19.99 KENWOOD J. LONDON 1993 .... 21.99 ALTAMURA 1993 .............. 24.99 ARROWDOD 1993 ............ 27.99 MERLOT DUBOEUF 1995/96 ............. 5.99 NOTTAGE HILL 1994 ........... 5.99 EXTENSIVE SELECTION OF WINES INCLUDING THESE FINE VINTAGE WINES GLEN ELLEN 1994 ............. 6.99 FORTANT FRANCE 1995 ........ 6.99 CAVIT TRENTINO 1994 ....... .. 7.49 CEDAR BROOK 1995 ........... 7.99 STONE CREEK 1994 ........... 7.99 WOODBRIDGE 1995 ............ 7.99 BOGLE 1995 .................. 8.99 ROUND HILL 1995 ............. 8.99 TESSERA 1995 ................ 9.99 FETZER EAGLE PEAK 1994 ..... 9.99 KENDALL JACKSON 1994 ..... .14.99 CHATEAU ST. JEAN 1994 ....... 16.99 ST. FRANCIS 1994 ............ 19.99 ITALIAN / CHIANTI STRACCAL11995 .............. 5.99 CHECCI CLASSICO 1995 ........ 8.99 BROLIO CLASSICO 1994 ....... 11.99 BROLIO RESERVA 1993 ........ 14.99 RUFFINO RES. DUCALE 1993 ...16,99 NANDO EAROLO 1991 .. ....... 22.99 CHARDONNAY DUBOEUF 1995 ............... 5.99 NO'I'I'AGE HILL 1995 ........... 5.99 GLEN ELLEN (1.5L) ............ 8.99 COLUMBIA CREST 1995 ........ 5.99 FETZER 1995 ................. 6.99 CEDAR BROOK 1995 ........... 7.99 WOOl)BRIDGE 1995 ............ 7.99 NAPA RIDGE 195 .............. 8.49 BOGLE 1995 .................. 8.49 BUENA VISTA 1994 ............. 9,99 TESSERA 1995 ................ 9.99 ROUND HILL 1995 .............. 8.49 FOREST GLEN 1995 ............ 8.99 BERINGER 1995. ............. 11.99 KENDALL JACKSON 1996 ...... 10.99 CHATEAU SOUVERAIN 1995 .... 12.99 KENWOOD SONOMA 1995 ..... 14.99 CHALK HILL 1994 ............. 19.99 ZlNFANDEL WOOD BRIDGE 1993 ........... 7.99 BERINGER 1993 .............. 11.99 RAVENSWOOD SONOMA 1993 ..13.99 ALDERBROOK 1995 ........... 12.99 WINE SELECTION OF THE WEEK HARDYS NOTTAGE HILL CABERNET / SHIRAZ 1995 5 99 WINE SPECTATOR RATED 84  "SMOOTH AUSTRALIAN WINE wrrH APPEALING BERRY FLAVORS"