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Cape Gazette NEWS TUESDAY, MAY 25- THURSDAY, MAY 27, 2010 5 Sussex council once again passes casino moratorium No applications accepted for at least six months By Ron MacArthur ronm@capegazette.com Now it's official. Sussex Coun- ty has enacted a six-month mora- torium on casino, gambling and gaming facility applications in unincorporated areas of the county. Council passed a similar mora- torium March 30, but on the ad- vice of its legal staff brought the issue back to approve it as an or- dinance and not a simple motion. Council enacted the moratori- um, voting 3-2, at its Tuesday, May 18 meeting to allow staff more time to prepare a zoning ordinance specifically dealing with zoning, regulations and re- strictions relating to gambling venues. As the county enacts a morato- rium, the fate of casino expan- sion in the state is still in limbo. A vote for expansion of the three existing venues might not come to the floor during the current General Assembly session end- ing June 30. The county has no applica- tions pending for gambling ven- ues, although four possible proj- ects have surfaced - two within town limits in Delmar and Mills- boro, and two within county ju- risdiction near Georgetown and in Delaware Seashore State Park near the Indian River Inlet. Council President Vance Phillips, R-Laurel, and members Joan Dearer, D-Rehoboth Beach, and Sam Wilson, R-Georgetown, voted in favor of the ordinance while members Mike V'mcent, R- Seaford, and George Cole, R- Ocean View, voted in opposition. Phillips, who cast the deciding vote, said under normal circum- stances he does not support moratoriums. "They are an indi- cation of poor planning, but this is a unique situation. Gambling Continued on page 8 Animal Continued from page 3 Anne Cavanaugh, director of the Georgetown shelter, said Delaware SPCA has reduced its euthanasia rate by 70 percent in the last two years. Cavanaugh said in 2009 Delaware SPCA shelters in New Castle and Sussex counties took in more than 4,100 unwanted or homeless dogs and cats. Of those, 3,279 were placed in new homes, returned to their owners or transferred to rescue organi- zations. "We are looking for the pub- lic's help as well, and we want to work together with other groups" she said. She said many are under the mistaken perception the SPCA is a government agency. She said the organization, which is run- ning a $600,000 deficit, is a pri- vate, nonprofit group operating on donations and fundraising events. Cut on other's funding Many at the meeting ex- pressed concern that Safe Haven's fundraising efforts over the past six years have hurt small, grassroots groups. Barry said some groups sur- vive off donation cans placed in stores. He said donation cans were providing about $200 a month income to the Lewes group. "The income was not huge, but when Safe Haven put their cans out, our income was cut in h," he said. "I have to ad- mit they have done a good job funaising." Safe Haven has been able to garner several grants and loans during a capital campaign to pur- chase 14 acres and build its $3.5- million sanctuary, including grants of $700,000 from the Longwood Foundation, $100,000 from the Welfare Foundation and a $3.3 million rural development loan from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. That's on top of several years of successful fundraisers coordi- nated by Safe Haven as well as other businesses doing benefits for the organization. Several meeting attendees questioned the time involved and the scope of the Safe Haven project. "We all welcome anoth- er animal sanctuary in Delaware," said Kate Hunger- ford, a former Safe Haven volun- teer who now volunteers with the Delaware SPCA. "But it's taken seven years, and there is not one stick in the ground." Hungerford said they could have started small, gotten the fa- cility up and running and then / added to it. "My greatest concern is that they will fill their kennels and not have the money to operate. Then what happens to the ani- mals?" Hungerford asked. Gryczon previously said the sanctuary would be able to han- dle as many as 400 dogs and cats a month. As a no-kill sanctuary, those that can't be adopted would be allowed to live at the facility. Those in attendance agreed Safe Haven has cornered politi- cal support and placed influen- tial people on its board. Barry said requests were made to place representatives from some of the grassroots rescue groups on the Safe Haven board, but that didn't happen. "They have the prominent people backing them; they have the money," said Sam Harrison of Millsboro. "We are iust the little people, but we have love for ani- mals." "If we join forces we can be- come stronger than Safe Haven," Palen said. But some said accountability is still an issue. "It's disrespectful they aren't here tonight and don't want to be accountable," Hungerford said. In response to questions raised at the meeting, Gryczon said, "It is very sad that there are so many groups that are opposed to no- kill sheltering. With the will and proper policies all shelters can and should be no-kill. Progres- sive communities and countries around the world have proven that no-kill can be successful and it is the only ethical alternative" Concerts at'the Farm Carolyn. Peck Servant's Heart & Sonrise June 5, 2010 - 6 PM $15 Preferred Seating $t0 General Admission Food & beverages for sale t Marilyn  Catering Location: Sam Yoder's Farm Concert Hall & Camping 89 Hunting Quarter Road, Houston, DE 19954 Call 302-398-0256 [ 302-363-0076' Cape Gazette NEWS TUESDAY, MAY 25- THURSDAY, MAY 27, 2010 5 Sussex council once again passes casino moratorium No applications accepted for at least six months By Ron MacArthur ronm@capegazette.com Now it's official. Sussex Coun- ty has enacted a six-month mora- torium on casino, gambling and gaming facility applications in unincorporated areas of the county. Council passed a similar mora- torium March 30, but on the ad- vice of its legal staff brought the issue back to approve it as an or- dinance and not a simple motion. Council enacted the moratori- um, voting 3-2, at its Tuesday, May 18 meeting to allow staff more time to prepare a zoning ordinance specifically dealing with zoning, regulations and re- strictions relating to gambling venues. As the county enacts a morato- rium, the fate of casino expan- sion in the state is still in limbo. A vote for expansion of the three existing venues might not come to the floor during the current General Assembly session end- ing June 30. The county has no applica- tions pending for gambling ven- ues, although four possible proj- ects have surfaced - two within town limits in Delmar and Mills- boro, and two within county ju- risdiction near Georgetown and in Delaware Seashore State Park near the Indian River Inlet. Council President Vance Phillips, R-Laurel, and members Joan Dearer, D-Rehoboth Beach, and Sam Wilson, R-Georgetown, voted in favor of the ordinance while members Mike V'mcent, R- Seaford, and George Cole, R- Ocean View, voted in opposition. Phillips, who cast the deciding vote, said under normal circum- stances he does not support moratoriums. "They are an indi- cation of poor planning, but this is a unique situation. Gambling Continued on page 8 Animal Continued from page 3 Anne Cavanaugh, director of the Georgetown shelter, said Delaware SPCA has reduced its euthanasia rate by 70 percent in the last two years. Cavanaugh said in 2009 Delaware SPCA shelters in New Castle and Sussex counties took in more than 4,100 unwanted or homeless dogs and cats. Of those, 3,279 were placed in new homes, returned to their owners or transferred to rescue organi- zations. "We are looking for the pub- lic's help as well, and we want to work together with other groups" she said. She said many are under the mistaken perception the SPCA is a government agency. She said the organization, which is run- ning a $600,000 deficit, is a pri- vate, nonprofit group operating on donations and fundraising events. Cut on other's funding Many at the meeting ex- pressed concern that Safe Haven's fundraising efforts over the past six years have hurt small, grassroots groups. Barry said some groups sur- vive off donation cans placed in stores. He said donation cans were providing about $200 a month income to the Lewes group. "The income was not huge, but when Safe Haven put their cans out, our income was cut in h," he said. "I have to ad- mit they have done a good job funaising." Safe Haven has been able to garner several grants and loans during a capital campaign to pur- chase 14 acres and build its $3.5- million sanctuary, including grants of $700,000 from the Longwood Foundation, $100,000 from the Welfare Foundation and a $3.3 million rural development loan from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. That's on top of several years of successful fundraisers coordi- nated by Safe Haven as well as other businesses doing benefits for the organization. Several meeting attendees questioned the time involved and the scope of the Safe Haven project. "We all welcome anoth- er animal sanctuary in Delaware," said Kate Hunger- ford, a former Safe Haven volun- teer who now volunteers with the Delaware SPCA. "But it's taken seven years, and there is not one stick in the ground." Hungerford said they could have started small, gotten the fa- cility up and running and then / added to it. "My greatest concern is that they will fill their kennels and not have the money to operate. Then what happens to the ani- mals?" Hungerford asked. Gryczon previously said the sanctuary would be able to han- dle as many as 400 dogs and cats a month. As a no-kill sanctuary, those that can't be adopted would be allowed to live at the facility. Those in attendance agreed Safe Haven has cornered politi- cal support and placed influen- tial people on its board. Barry said requests were made to place representatives from some of the grassroots rescue groups on the Safe Haven board, but that didn't happen. "They have the prominent people backing them; they have the money," said Sam Harrison of Millsboro. "We are iust the little people, but we have love for ani- mals." "If we join forces we can be- come stronger than Safe Haven," Palen said. But some said accountability is still an issue. "It's disrespectful they aren't here tonight and don't want to be accountable," Hungerford said. In response to questions raised at the meeting, Gryczon said, "It is very sad that there are so many groups that are opposed to no- kill sheltering. With the will and proper policies all shelters can and should be no-kill. Progres- sive communities and countries around the world have proven that no-kill can be successful and it is the only ethical alternative" Concerts at'the Farm Carolyn. Peck Servant's Heart & Sonrise June 5, 2010 - 6 PM $15 Preferred Seating $t0 General Admission Food & beverages for sale t Marilyn  Catering Location: Sam Yoder's Farm Concert Hall & Camping 89 Hunting Quarter Road, Houston, DE 19954 Call 302-398-0256 [ 302-363-0076'