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Lewes, Delaware
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June 4, 2004     Cape Gazette
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June 4, 2004
 

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Upgrading the city's sewer plant remains the primary project as Lewes Board of Public Works pre pares to embark on a three'year capital im provement plan, BPW . Continued from page 1 I Guthorn encouraged BPW Andrew Keegan photo some projects instead of borrow- ing everything," said Guthorn. "Generally speaking, SRF iS approved." O'Donnell iridicated the board board memb,'ds to allow flexibili- should know by September which ty in selecting the first phase of projects :wlill receive funding projects. "Perhaps some,, projects,, ugh tliistate program. At that get conipleted ahead of tune, said point, the city will be in position Guthorn, "but it's been my experi- ence that not all projects start or finish on time." BPW President Gary Stabley said he has received inquiries on whether the bonds will be made available for local residents. "The firm doesn't get an allot- ment of bonds because they e not the underwriter," explained Guthorn. "Major New York hous- es buy the bonds and they may or may not sell retail. Seeing that Lewes is a pretty tight knit com- munity, we can try to do a little extra work on this issue." All bonds will be issued in $5,000 denominations BPW Engineer Charlie O'Donnell outlined which capital projects in the boards five-year plan could be completed within the three-year allotment. The city's wastewater treatment plant remains at the top of the list and the cost has risen $500,000 since the last estimate in March. Upgrading the plant from 750,000 gallons a day to 1.5 million gal- lons is now estimated to cost $8,942,000. On the positive side, funding for the plant is tentatively scheduled for State Revolving Funds (SRF), which is available for certain projects at a much lower market rate than bonds. Of BPW projects slated for three-year funding,.SRF accounts for $12,298,200. The remaining amount, $9,472,855 is to be fund- ed through bonds. However, since the city has to apply for SRF, there is no guarantee that all the proj- ects slated for the lower interest rate will be approved. If that situ- ation develops, the board has two options, said Guthorn. Any amount not funded can be moved to bond issuance or the city can o pay cash. "You may f'md yourself in three years paying cash for for the issuimce of bonds. In analyzing projects by year, 22 are proposed for 2004 at a total cost of $16,554,185. Some of the projects are already under way, like instrument and equipment improvements at the water plant. Additionally, not all projects will have to go out to bid. BPW will be handling some of the projects in- house, including beach-side inflow rehabilitation at a cost of $96,000 and three separate electri- cal upgrades totaling more than $209,000. In utilizing its own employee s, BPW does not incur the cost of contracted labor and equipment. Seven projects are designated for 2005 at a cost of $3,318,870. The largest project, at an estimat- ed cost of $1,381,000, is the first phase off the Second Street corri- dor rehabilitation. A majority of the city's commercial core will receive upgraded sewer, water and stormwater connections as well as the placement of cables under- ground. : Only two projects are currently planned for 2006 with the largest expenditure being an elevated 750,000 gallon elevated storage tank costing $1,560,000. According to O'Donnell, the pro- posed water tower will handle the city's needs until 2050. Although total cost of the three- year plan is $21,771,055, Guthorn advised the board to allow a buffer in case certain projects come in at a higher bid than estimated. "You don't want to pin yourself down to an exact amount because honestly, estimates can never be 100 per- cent accurate," he said. "You want flexibility from day one." The board followed that advice and voted to request an amount not to exceed $25 million for the first phase of projects. SPECIALIZING IN FINE FURNITURE AND ANTIQUES YEARS OF EXPERIENCE IN REVITALIZING WOODEN TREASURES. CAPE GAZETI, Friday, June 4 June 10, 2004 15 F'reservation r reel delays action on ordinance By Andrew Keegan Despite grumbling from several members, Lewes' Historic Preservation Commission (HPC) voted to request that city council postpone implementation of an ordinance that will oversee construction in a des- ignated historic district zone until Jan. 1, 2005. The regulations, which are an attempt to retain the city's historic charm, were passed last fall and scheduled to take effect July 10. Former Mayor George H.P. Smith appoinled the seven-member panel in April. The group will be in charge of approving applications that affect building, enlarging or improving houses within the district, which encompasses many of the city's older neigh- borhoods. Ordinary maintenance and repair are ex- cluded from the review process. A majority of HPC members indicated that a lengthy delay was necessary for them to fully under- stand the ordinance they were appointed to enforce. During last month's inaugural HPC meeting, the commission toyed with the idea of delaying enforce- ment of the regulations until Oct. 10. However, after launching into only its second organized meeting, several members expressed concern about getting off on the wrong foot. "I would suggest the first of the year," said HPC member Denise Seliskar. "It will be July before we even get the brochure going." Seliskar was referring to the panel's first task of creating a concise, informative handout to give to perspective applicants. Three members, Barbara Jean Doran, Joseph Kosoveach and James Richmann, dis- agreed with the proposed delay. "It's been three years in the making," said Kosoveach. "By the time we get to the first of the year we won't have anything left to review. October is certainly far enough ahead or we should forget it." Doran surmised that the longer the postponement, the more likely the panel will have no sense of ur- Continued on page 16 of furniture and accessories. Free local delivery + we ship anywhere! Interior designer on staff All major credit cards accepted Open all year, seven days a week Locally owned, operated, and committed to our community HIGHWAY LOCATION 4120 Highway One,,Rehoboth Beach, DE toll free 888-850-9224 302-227-1500 www.abizaks.com Visit our other store in downtown Rehoboth i Tf I / and classes are filling up  Stop byfor a visit Mon-ThUrs (after 5:45pm) or give us a call  anytime at 226-STKD (above the Abizak's furniture store) ' " ......................... Proud to be an official Park's Martial Arts branch school (Grandmaster Sung Hong Park, founder). I I ......................................... I - - I I fl I Ii I " Upgrading the city's sewer plant remains the primary project as Lewes Board of Public Works pre pares to embark on a three'year capital im provement plan, BPW . Continued from page 1 I Guthorn encouraged BPW Andrew Keegan photo some projects instead of borrow- ing everything," said Guthorn. "Generally speaking, SRF iS approved." O'Donnell iridicated the board board memb,'ds to allow flexibili- should know by September which ty in selecting the first phase of projects :wlill receive funding projects. "Perhaps some,, projects,, ugh tliistate program. At that get conipleted ahead of tune, said point, the city will be in position Guthorn, "but it's been my experi- ence that not all projects start or finish on time." BPW President Gary Stabley said he has received inquiries on whether the bonds will be made available for local residents. "The firm doesn't get an allot- ment of bonds because they e not the underwriter," explained Guthorn. "Major New York hous- es buy the bonds and they may or may not sell retail. Seeing that Lewes is a pretty tight knit com- munity, we can try to do a little extra work on this issue." All bonds will be issued in $5,000 denominations BPW Engineer Charlie O'Donnell outlined which capital projects in the boards five-year plan could be completed within the three-year allotment. The city's wastewater treatment plant remains at the top of the list and the cost has risen $500,000 since the last estimate in March. Upgrading the plant from 750,000 gallons a day to 1.5 million gal- lons is now estimated to cost $8,942,000. On the positive side, funding for the plant is tentatively scheduled for State Revolving Funds (SRF), which is available for certain projects at a much lower market rate than bonds. Of BPW projects slated for three-year funding,.SRF accounts for $12,298,200. The remaining amount, $9,472,855 is to be fund- ed through bonds. However, since the city has to apply for SRF, there is no guarantee that all the proj- ects slated for the lower interest rate will be approved. If that situ- ation develops, the board has two options, said Guthorn. Any amount not funded can be moved to bond issuance or the city can o pay cash. "You may f'md yourself in three years paying cash for for the issuimce of bonds. In analyzing projects by year, 22 are proposed for 2004 at a total cost of $16,554,185. Some of the projects are already under way, like instrument and equipment improvements at the water plant. Additionally, not all projects will have to go out to bid. BPW will be handling some of the projects in- house, including beach-side inflow rehabilitation at a cost of $96,000 and three separate electri- cal upgrades totaling more than $209,000. In utilizing its own employee s, BPW does not incur the cost of contracted labor and equipment. Seven projects are designated for 2005 at a cost of $3,318,870. The largest project, at an estimat- ed cost of $1,381,000, is the first phase off the Second Street corri- dor rehabilitation. A majority of the city's commercial core will receive upgraded sewer, water and stormwater connections as well as the placement of cables under- ground. : Only two projects are currently planned for 2006 with the largest expenditure being an elevated 750,000 gallon elevated storage tank costing $1,560,000. According to O'Donnell, the pro- posed water tower will handle the city's needs until 2050. Although total cost of the three- year plan is $21,771,055, Guthorn advised the board to allow a buffer in case certain projects come in at a higher bid than estimated. "You don't want to pin yourself down to an exact amount because honestly, estimates can never be 100 per- cent accurate," he said. "You want flexibility from day one." The board followed that advice and voted to request an amount not to exceed $25 million for the first phase of projects. SPECIALIZING IN FINE FURNITURE AND ANTIQUES YEARS OF EXPERIENCE IN REVITALIZING WOODEN TREASURES. CAPE GAZETI, Friday, June 4 June 10, 2004 15 F'reservation r reel delays action on ordinance By Andrew Keegan Despite grumbling from several members, Lewes' Historic Preservation Commission (HPC) voted to request that city council postpone implementation of an ordinance that will oversee construction in a des- ignated historic district zone until Jan. 1, 2005. The regulations, which are an attempt to retain the city's historic charm, were passed last fall and scheduled to take effect July 10. Former Mayor George H.P. Smith appoinled the seven-member panel in April. The group will be in charge of approving applications that affect building, enlarging or improving houses within the district, which encompasses many of the city's older neigh- borhoods. Ordinary maintenance and repair are ex- cluded from the review process. A majority of HPC members indicated that a lengthy delay was necessary for them to fully under- stand the ordinance they were appointed to enforce. During last month's inaugural HPC meeting, the commission toyed with the idea of delaying enforce- ment of the regulations until Oct. 10. However, after launching into only its second organized meeting, several members expressed concern about getting off on the wrong foot. "I would suggest the first of the year," said HPC member Denise Seliskar. "It will be July before we even get the brochure going." Seliskar was referring to the panel's first task of creating a concise, informative handout to give to perspective applicants. Three members, Barbara Jean Doran, Joseph Kosoveach and James Richmann, dis- agreed with the proposed delay. "It's been three years in the making," said Kosoveach. "By the time we get to the first of the year we won't have anything left to review. October is certainly far enough ahead or we should forget it." Doran surmised that the longer the postponement, the more likely the panel will have no sense of ur- Continued on page 16 of furniture and accessories. Free local delivery + we ship anywhere! Interior designer on staff All major credit cards accepted Open all year, seven days a week Locally owned, operated, and committed to our community HIGHWAY LOCATION 4120 Highway One,,Rehoboth Beach, DE toll free 888-850-9224 302-227-1500 www.abizaks.com Visit our other store in downtown Rehoboth i Tf I / and classes are filling up  Stop byfor a visit Mon-ThUrs (after 5:45pm) or give us a call  anytime at 226-STKD (above the Abizak's furniture store) ' " ......................... Proud to be an official Park's Martial Arts branch school (Grandmaster Sung Hong Park, founder). I I ......................................... I - - I I fl I Ii I "