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June 4, 2004     Cape Gazette
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June 4, 2004
 

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24 - CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, June 4 - June 10, 2004 Tristan Spinski photo Juvenile owl trespasses in Lewes A baby owl has perched itself on the doorsteps of several Lewes businesses this week. On June 1, the owl sat at the edge of a driftwood bench on the porch of Two Friends, Ltd., on Second Street. After neighbors caught the young bird and officials from Tri State Bird Rescue examined the owl, it was released. Stacey Wiles, general manager at Inn at Canal Square, said after the bird was returned to its original perch, the owl's bi- ological parents showed up around 6 p.m. and took it home. The following morning, the critter set up camp in front of Down by the Sea, a small boutique next to Two Friend, Ltd.. Megan Kuhn, store manager, said that she showed up to work early and found the little owl blocking her doorway. "I thought it was a squirrel without a head," Kuhn said. "I called my morn and said: 'Mom, what do Ido? There's a baby owl." Kuhn said that Patrick Jackson, a Lewes police officer and high school friend of Kuhn's, happened to be passing by. Jackson contacted state wildlife officials, and brought the owl in for medical examination. "There wasn't any visible signs that it was in distress," Jackson said. "He was pecking at me." Jackson said that despite the bird's small size, he still approached it with caution. "When I got down and looked him right in the face, I said: Meghan, he's got two options. He can either walk back into the bushes or he could come at us right now," Jackson said, laughing. He added that the owl's wide-eyed stare was somewhat disarming. After the owl was examined, authorities released it near the gazebo down the street in hopes that itsparents will come to claim the young bird, again. Shown is the baby owl in front of Two Friends, Ltd. Turn Pella Windows Into Gran0000 Openings Agenda, Continued from page 22 The bill which received high ranking support from House lead- ers June 3 is sure to be high on the agenda before the session ends. Spence said he structured the bill so that the bulk of the cost will fall in Fiscal Year 2006. "This gives us a chance to plan for the expected cost before the new budget cycle even begins and pro- vides an opportunity for seeking new recruits and laying the groundwork for some of the other goals specified in the bill," said Spence. Sussex County municipal and county governments came a step closer June 2 to being given the opportunity to have redevelop- ment, infrastructure and develop- ment impact cost financed through tax increment financing (TIF) and the establishment of special development districts (SDD). The bill, SB 240, earned Senate approval in May and cleared its House committee fol- lowing an assignment change and lengthy hearing. Rep. Joe Booth, R-Georgetown, the primary House sponsor, said he will push for the bill to come to a vote before the end of session. SB 240 would enable TIF and SDD funding obtained through the issuance of bonds which are repaid through revenue generated by real estate taxes imposed in the project area. The legislature passed a similar act last session which applied only to Wilmington. On that bill, Booth and Hocker werethe only dissenting votes. "I wasn't against it; I thought that all municipalities should benefit from it. It makes sense to do something fight the first time," said Booth. A once popular initiative to es- tablish full day kindergarten got sent to the back of the line June 2 when House Education Commit- tee declined to vote on the initia- tive following a long hearing. Although primary sponsor Rep. Melanie George, D-Newark, chair of the Early Education Taskforce, produced several professionals to testify and has the backing of the taskforce and governor, she was not able to secure a vote. Counted among the skeptics of the bill is House Majority Leader Rep. Wayne Smith, R-Clair Manor. Smith, who attended the hearing, said he needs more specifics about appropriations. "I have not had a parent come to me saying they need full day kinder- [ garten. I have had plenty come to ! me complaining about large class I sizes, said Smith. A second com- ] mittee hearing for the bill is I schedu!ed for Wednesday, _May9. ..... I ................. 00100 off each installed replacement window (minimum of 4)* grand opening s 00200 off each installed replacement patio or French door* K.C. COMPANY, INC. 1-800-621-2080 www.kc-pella.com, e Easton ] Lewes I Salisburyl N *Excludes Proline windows and dos. Other restrictions apply. Must be installed by a KC Company Pella professional. See store or sales representative for details. Offers expire May 31, 2004. MHIC# 38731. 24 - CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, June 4 - June 10, 2004 Tristan Spinski photo Juvenile owl trespasses in Lewes A baby owl has perched itself on the doorsteps of several Lewes businesses this week. On June 1, the owl sat at the edge of a driftwood bench on the porch of Two Friends, Ltd., on Second Street. After neighbors caught the young bird and officials from Tri State Bird Rescue examined the owl, it was released. Stacey Wiles, general manager at Inn at Canal Square, said after the bird was returned to its original perch, the owl's bi- ological parents showed up around 6 p.m. and took it home. The following morning, the critter set up camp in front of Down by the Sea, a small boutique next to Two Friend, Ltd.. Megan Kuhn, store manager, said that she showed up to work early and found the little owl blocking her doorway. "I thought it was a squirrel without a head," Kuhn said. "I called my morn and said: 'Mom, what do Ido? There's a baby owl." Kuhn said that Patrick Jackson, a Lewes police officer and high school friend of Kuhn's, happened to be passing by. Jackson contacted state wildlife officials, and brought the owl in for medical examination. "There wasn't any visible signs that it was in distress," Jackson said. "He was pecking at me." Jackson said that despite the bird's small size, he still approached it with caution. "When I got down and looked him right in the face, I said: Meghan, he's got two options. He can either walk back into the bushes or he could come at us right now," Jackson said, laughing. He added that the owl's wide-eyed stare was somewhat disarming. After the owl was examined, authorities released it near the gazebo down the street in hopes that itsparents will come to claim the young bird, again. Shown is the baby owl in front of Two Friends, Ltd. Turn Pella Windows Into Gran0000 Openings Agenda, Continued from page 22 The bill which received high ranking support from House lead- ers June 3 is sure to be high on the agenda before the session ends. Spence said he structured the bill so that the bulk of the cost will fall in Fiscal Year 2006. "This gives us a chance to plan for the expected cost before the new budget cycle even begins and pro- vides an opportunity for seeking new recruits and laying the groundwork for some of the other goals specified in the bill," said Spence. Sussex County municipal and county governments came a step closer June 2 to being given the opportunity to have redevelop- ment, infrastructure and develop- ment impact cost financed through tax increment financing (TIF) and the establishment of special development districts (SDD). The bill, SB 240, earned Senate approval in May and cleared its House committee fol- lowing an assignment change and lengthy hearing. Rep. Joe Booth, R-Georgetown, the primary House sponsor, said he will push for the bill to come to a vote before the end of session. SB 240 would enable TIF and SDD funding obtained through the issuance of bonds which are repaid through revenue generated by real estate taxes imposed in the project area. The legislature passed a similar act last session which applied only to Wilmington. On that bill, Booth and Hocker werethe only dissenting votes. "I wasn't against it; I thought that all municipalities should benefit from it. It makes sense to do something fight the first time," said Booth. A once popular initiative to es- tablish full day kindergarten got sent to the back of the line June 2 when House Education Commit- tee declined to vote on the initia- tive following a long hearing. Although primary sponsor Rep. Melanie George, D-Newark, chair of the Early Education Taskforce, produced several professionals to testify and has the backing of the taskforce and governor, she was not able to secure a vote. Counted among the skeptics of the bill is House Majority Leader Rep. Wayne Smith, R-Clair Manor. Smith, who attended the hearing, said he needs more specifics about appropriations. "I have not had a parent come to me saying they need full day kinder- [ garten. I have had plenty come to ! me complaining about large class I sizes, said Smith. A second com- ] mittee hearing for the bill is I schedu!ed for Wednesday, _May9. ..... I ................. 00100 off each installed replacement window (minimum of 4)* grand opening s 00200 off each installed replacement patio or French door* K.C. COMPANY, INC. 1-800-621-2080 www.kc-pella.com, e Easton ] Lewes I Salisburyl N *Excludes Proline windows and dos. Other restrictions apply. Must be installed by a KC Company Pella professional. See store or sales representative for details. Offers expire May 31, 2004. MHIC# 38731.