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CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, June 4 - June 10, 2004 - 83 HEALTH & FITNESS Castle explains Medicare drug card plan to area seniors By Tara Lyric Congressman Mike Castle held a Town Hall meeting at the Ango- la by the Bay clubhouse, May 28, to discuss a topic of concern to many senior citizens: the new Medicare drug discount cards that became available June 1. Joining Castle at the meeting were Rep. John Atkins, R-Millsboro; Rep. Pete Schwartzkopf, D-Rehoboth Beach; and Sen. Gary Simpson, R-Milford. "Health care is a matter of tremendous interest to me,, said Castle. "The most important thing I can do today is leave be- hind information to help you get to information. Medicare is complicated. I wish it was not." Castle said the Medicare went into ef- fect in 1965, CASTLE and President Bush set aside funds for prescription drugs for seniors in 2003, in the form of the Medicare prescription drug bill. "It is totally optional," said Cas- tle. "You don't have to do it. You can continue with the basic [pre- scription drug coverage] plan you already have." Castle advised seniors to shop around for the prescription drug discount card, since there are ap- proximately 40 available to them. He said there is a $35 per month premium and a $250 deductible for card users, or the equivalent of $750 total. "I figure it starts to break even at about $850 or so," said Castle. One-third of Delawareans fit in- to the lower income category, ac- cording to Castle, and 38 percent of all Delaware residents have no medical coverage at all. "You can imagine what it is like to have no coverage at all," said Medicare drul00 di scount cards offer savings on prescriptions for seniors By Tara Lytle Senior citizens will average a 20 percent savings on prescription drugs when using the new Medicare; drug discount cards, according to Michael Freeman, executive vice president of Healthcare Leadership Council (HLC). The program is already in effect as part of the new Medicare Act and was passed by Congress last year. "We're trying to get the word out," said Freeman. "We've been working with Rep. Mike Castle to get the word out to constituents and the word is getting out pretty quickly. Seniors are signing up for the cards this month and will be able to start using them on June I." HLC, a coalition of health care companies and or- ganizations, recently conducted a study that looked at the top 150 drugs used by senior citizens. The study proved that by using the new drug discount cards, seniors will average savings of 20 percent, with some drug savings ranging from 5-80 percent. Freeman said the qualification for obtaining the new drug discount card is that seniors must be eligi- ble for Medicare. He also added that if their income Continued on page 84 Castle. Lower-income single seniors who fall below the $12,569 per year income level, and married seniors who fall below the $16,862 income level qualify for a $600 per year credit for Medicare- approved prescription drugs. "Income is determined very an- alytically," said Castle. "It is tied in to the cost of liv- ing." Citing the allergy medication Zantac as an example, Castle said generic drugs are one of the best ways to save money on prescrip- tions. 'q'here is a huge savings on generics," said Castle. "The sooner we can get rid of the [pharmaceutical company] patents, the sooner we can get to the generics and reduce the costs." "We are living in America longer [than ever before]," said Castle. "We are living in America better lives than ever before." For more information, call Medicare at 800-MEDICARE or visit the website at www.- medicare.gov. Carper celebrates older Americans; discusses drug discount cards By Tara Lytle Decorated like the 4th of July, Georgetown's CHEER Center was the site of Sen. Tom Carper's discussion on Medicare drug dis- count cards May 28. Combining his question-and-answer session with Older Americans Day, Carp- er greeted the numerous veterans in the audience. "This Memorial Day is espe- cially challenging given the type of [problems] we're facing in Afghanistan and Iraq," said Carp- er. "Memorial Day isn't just about parades. We need to be mindful of the sacrifices that peo- pie are making for us on the other side of the world." After the clapping died down, Carper got to the heart of his speech. Beginning June 1, drug discount cards became available for many senior citizens on Medicare. Carper stressed that the program is voluntary; howev- er, because there are at least 40 cards available, seniors should re- search which card is right for them. "Don't rush into it," said Carp- er. "If you don't sign up [for the drug discount card] in June, you Continued on page 84 Parents can help children gain most from summer camp More than 10 million children go to summer camp each year. For most, it's a fun and rewarding experience full of challenges and excitement. In addition to physi- cal and athletic activities, kids learn about independence, cooper- ation, competition and teamwork. They also learn that they can sur- vive away from home. For many children, summer camp is also a time of significant emotional growth, development and transition. Parents often note their children come home seem- ing older or more mature than be- fore they left. Although most children are ex- cited about going to summer camp, for some, it can be a scary or anxiety provoking experience. In general, parents should not push or force kids to go to camp if they feel frightened or uncomfort- able. The following tips are designed to help parents prepare their kids for summer camp and deal with issues that may arise: • Choose a camp that is suited to your child's personality, tempera- ment and interests. If your child likes music, art or horseback rid- ing, it makes sense to pick a camp HEALTH TOPICS Dr. David Fassler Dr. David Fassler is a child and adolescent psychiatrist practicing in Burlington, Vt. He is also a clinical associate professor for the University of Vermont Department of Psychiatry. Fassler serves as a trustee at large of the American Psychiatric Asso- ciation, which offers more information at psych.org. same time, there is nothing wrong With encouraging kids to try new things or to have a variety of ex- periences. In general, it is best not to force kids to do things at camp that they Repeated negative experiences can have a significant effect on a child's self-esteem. • Involve your child in choosing the camp. Review brochures, videos and websites together. Ask for the names of other families you and your child can talk to about the camp. • Don't push kids to go to camp at too early an age. The right age will vary from child to child. Some kids are ready for sleep- away camp at 5 or 6, while others would not even consider the idea at 14 or 15. If a child doesn't seem ready for a full summer away, consider a camp that has one-month sessions. It may be an easier transition and a more posi- tive experience. • If your child is shy, consider a camp where the child knows and likes at least one other person the same age. Having one friend makes it easier to meet other kids. • If you choose a camp that is driving distance, consider an off- season visit to help familiarize your child with the setting. It's not unlike visiting a new school with your child. • Encourage kids to bring fa- vorite toys, books, music or other i,.w).tb.sIeltg_8 irl IbgLe.a+. _AI Jl_ _ m _ally _dj" lik. 9.r .si_ .mpl.x .c _i9_. 9t..d9 m Le _minders of home such as photos or even favorite foods, if allowed by the camp. • If kids have issues or problems with other campers, encourage them to try to work things out themselves before intervening. Suggest they ask a counselor or the camp director for help or sug- gestions. Remember, part of camp is about learning how to deal with new people and differ- ent situations. • Don't be surprised if your child gets homesick. It's a normal reaction to being away from fami- Iy and friends, especially for the first time. Don't criticize a child who feels homesick at camp. Telling them to buck up can some- times make them feel worse. Instead, be supportive, reassur- ing and consistent. Tell them you understand that it's hard to be away from home, and that you miss them, too. Try to focus on intermittent goals, like Visiting Day or special camp events. Reg- ular, scheduled and predictable phone contact may also be help- ful. For most kids, episodes of homesickness pass within a few days. • If homesickness persists or seems severe, or if your child seems truly u nl.appy, talk to tle camp director. Is your child hav- ing a particular problem with an- other child or a counselor? Is there an activity or expectation that is causing difficulties? Are they being pushed to do things be- yond their level or capacity, like long distance swimming or ex- tended hikes? Or is it just the wrong setting for your child? In the end, trust your instincts. If you are convinced it's just not working out, do not be afraid to let your child come home. It's not the end of the world for you or for your child, and it's better than be- ing truly miserable or unhappy for an entire summer. • Help children keep in touch with friends from summer camp. Plan times for them to get togeth- er with kids who live nearby. For friends who live at a distance, let- ters, phone calls and email can help them maintain contact during the school year. Most kids enjoy camp. They often look forward to returning year after year. However, careful camp selection, preparation and planning can increase the likeli- hood of a positive experience. For more information, visit the American Psychiatric Association CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, June 4 - June 10, 2004 - 83 HEALTH & FITNESS Castle explains Medicare drug card plan to area seniors By Tara Lyric Congressman Mike Castle held a Town Hall meeting at the Ango- la by the Bay clubhouse, May 28, to discuss a topic of concern to many senior citizens: the new Medicare drug discount cards that became available June 1. Joining Castle at the meeting were Rep. John Atkins, R-Millsboro; Rep. Pete Schwartzkopf, D-Rehoboth Beach; and Sen. Gary Simpson, R-Milford. "Health care is a matter of tremendous interest to me,, said Castle. "The most important thing I can do today is leave be- hind information to help you get to information. Medicare is complicated. I wish it was not." Castle said the Medicare went into ef- fect in 1965, CASTLE and President Bush set aside funds for prescription drugs for seniors in 2003, in the form of the Medicare prescription drug bill. "It is totally optional," said Cas- tle. "You don't have to do it. You can continue with the basic [pre- scription drug coverage] plan you already have." Castle advised seniors to shop around for the prescription drug discount card, since there are ap- proximately 40 available to them. He said there is a $35 per month premium and a $250 deductible for card users, or the equivalent of $750 total. "I figure it starts to break even at about $850 or so," said Castle. One-third of Delawareans fit in- to the lower income category, ac- cording to Castle, and 38 percent of all Delaware residents have no medical coverage at all. "You can imagine what it is like to have no coverage at all," said Medicare drul00 di scount cards offer savings on prescriptions for seniors By Tara Lytle Senior citizens will average a 20 percent savings on prescription drugs when using the new Medicare; drug discount cards, according to Michael Freeman, executive vice president of Healthcare Leadership Council (HLC). The program is already in effect as part of the new Medicare Act and was passed by Congress last year. "We're trying to get the word out," said Freeman. "We've been working with Rep. Mike Castle to get the word out to constituents and the word is getting out pretty quickly. Seniors are signing up for the cards this month and will be able to start using them on June I." HLC, a coalition of health care companies and or- ganizations, recently conducted a study that looked at the top 150 drugs used by senior citizens. The study proved that by using the new drug discount cards, seniors will average savings of 20 percent, with some drug savings ranging from 5-80 percent. Freeman said the qualification for obtaining the new drug discount card is that seniors must be eligi- ble for Medicare. He also added that if their income Continued on page 84 Castle. Lower-income single seniors who fall below the $12,569 per year income level, and married seniors who fall below the $16,862 income level qualify for a $600 per year credit for Medicare- approved prescription drugs. "Income is determined very an- alytically," said Castle. "It is tied in to the cost of liv- ing." Citing the allergy medication Zantac as an example, Castle said generic drugs are one of the best ways to save money on prescrip- tions. 'q'here is a huge savings on generics," said Castle. "The sooner we can get rid of the [pharmaceutical company] patents, the sooner we can get to the generics and reduce the costs." "We are living in America longer [than ever before]," said Castle. "We are living in America better lives than ever before." For more information, call Medicare at 800-MEDICARE or visit the website at www.- medicare.gov. Carper celebrates older Americans; discusses drug discount cards By Tara Lytle Decorated like the 4th of July, Georgetown's CHEER Center was the site of Sen. Tom Carper's discussion on Medicare drug dis- count cards May 28. Combining his question-and-answer session with Older Americans Day, Carp- er greeted the numerous veterans in the audience. "This Memorial Day is espe- cially challenging given the type of [problems] we're facing in Afghanistan and Iraq," said Carp- er. "Memorial Day isn't just about parades. We need to be mindful of the sacrifices that peo- pie are making for us on the other side of the world." After the clapping died down, Carper got to the heart of his speech. Beginning June 1, drug discount cards became available for many senior citizens on Medicare. Carper stressed that the program is voluntary; howev- er, because there are at least 40 cards available, seniors should re- search which card is right for them. "Don't rush into it," said Carp- er. "If you don't sign up [for the drug discount card] in June, you Continued on page 84 Parents can help children gain most from summer camp More than 10 million children go to summer camp each year. For most, it's a fun and rewarding experience full of challenges and excitement. In addition to physi- cal and athletic activities, kids learn about independence, cooper- ation, competition and teamwork. They also learn that they can sur- vive away from home. For many children, summer camp is also a time of significant emotional growth, development and transition. Parents often note their children come home seem- ing older or more mature than be- fore they left. Although most children are ex- cited about going to summer camp, for some, it can be a scary or anxiety provoking experience. In general, parents should not push or force kids to go to camp if they feel frightened or uncomfort- able. The following tips are designed to help parents prepare their kids for summer camp and deal with issues that may arise: • Choose a camp that is suited to your child's personality, tempera- ment and interests. If your child likes music, art or horseback rid- ing, it makes sense to pick a camp HEALTH TOPICS Dr. David Fassler Dr. David Fassler is a child and adolescent psychiatrist practicing in Burlington, Vt. He is also a clinical associate professor for the University of Vermont Department of Psychiatry. Fassler serves as a trustee at large of the American Psychiatric Asso- ciation, which offers more information at psych.org. same time, there is nothing wrong With encouraging kids to try new things or to have a variety of ex- periences. In general, it is best not to force kids to do things at camp that they Repeated negative experiences can have a significant effect on a child's self-esteem. • Involve your child in choosing the camp. Review brochures, videos and websites together. Ask for the names of other families you and your child can talk to about the camp. • Don't push kids to go to camp at too early an age. The right age will vary from child to child. Some kids are ready for sleep- away camp at 5 or 6, while others would not even consider the idea at 14 or 15. If a child doesn't seem ready for a full summer away, consider a camp that has one-month sessions. It may be an easier transition and a more posi- tive experience. • If your child is shy, consider a camp where the child knows and likes at least one other person the same age. Having one friend makes it easier to meet other kids. • If you choose a camp that is driving distance, consider an off- season visit to help familiarize your child with the setting. It's not unlike visiting a new school with your child. • Encourage kids to bring fa- vorite toys, books, music or other i,.w).tb.sIeltg_8 irl IbgLe.a+. _AI Jl_ _ m _ally _dj" lik. 9.r .si_ .mpl.x .c _i9_. 9t..d9 m Le _minders of home such as photos or even favorite foods, if allowed by the camp. • If kids have issues or problems with other campers, encourage them to try to work things out themselves before intervening. Suggest they ask a counselor or the camp director for help or sug- gestions. Remember, part of camp is about learning how to deal with new people and differ- ent situations. • Don't be surprised if your child gets homesick. It's a normal reaction to being away from fami- Iy and friends, especially for the first time. Don't criticize a child who feels homesick at camp. Telling them to buck up can some- times make them feel worse. Instead, be supportive, reassur- ing and consistent. Tell them you understand that it's hard to be away from home, and that you miss them, too. Try to focus on intermittent goals, like Visiting Day or special camp events. Reg- ular, scheduled and predictable phone contact may also be help- ful. For most kids, episodes of homesickness pass within a few days. • If homesickness persists or seems severe, or if your child seems truly u nl.appy, talk to tle camp director. Is your child hav- ing a particular problem with an- other child or a counselor? Is there an activity or expectation that is causing difficulties? Are they being pushed to do things be- yond their level or capacity, like long distance swimming or ex- tended hikes? Or is it just the wrong setting for your child? In the end, trust your instincts. If you are convinced it's just not working out, do not be afraid to let your child come home. It's not the end of the world for you or for your child, and it's better than be- ing truly miserable or unhappy for an entire summer. • Help children keep in touch with friends from summer camp. Plan times for them to get togeth- er with kids who live nearby. For friends who live at a distance, let- ters, phone calls and email can help them maintain contact during the school year. Most kids enjoy camp. They often look forward to returning year after year. However, careful camp selection, preparation and planning can increase the likeli- hood of a positive experience. For more information, visit the American Psychiatric Association