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June 4, 2004     Cape Gazette
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96 - CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, June 4 - June 10, 2004 GARDEN & FARM GARDEN JOURNAL Paul Barbano Hemming and hawing around the garde00 Japan had Tokyo Rose and Hitler had William Joyce. In 1939 Joyce began work with the Nazi German Radio Corporation as an English language broadcast- er. But ahem, as a proper Brit might stage whisper to get one's attention, he wasn't widely ac- cepted. "Ahem," the gentle clearing of the throat is an imitative word, much like the imitative word for snooty speech, the whining mock of "haw haw." So William Joyce was described as "English of the haw-haw, damn-it-get-out-of-my-way vari- ety." Thereafter Joyce was mocked as "Lord Haw-Haw." The Old English word "haga," perhaps the same word for "hedge" gives us the American "haw," the fruit of the hedgerow hawthorn tree. And what better name for a haw that ripens in spring than the mayhaw (Cratae- gus aestivalis, C. rufula, or C. opaca.) Mayhaws are tart red berries that grow wild in the swamps and Mayhaws are tart red berries that grow wild in the swamps and begs of the American South. A distant COUSin of the rose, bogs of the American South. A distant cousin Of the rose, the plant grows into a small tree and bears fruit that look like small crab apples. Plant mayhaws 18 to 20 feet apart in partly shaded sites as an understory tree beneath tall trees. Mix peat moss into the soil and set the trees at the same depth they grew in the nursery. Form a ridge or a basin around the planting hole to collect water. Mayhaws prefer moist to wet soil, but adjust well to drier soil. For best results your soil should have a pH 6.0to 6.5. The trees need about one inch of water per week during the growing season. Mttyhaws are Surprisingly hardy in USDA Zones-6-9, but they will die if the temperature goes to 20. below zero. Once your trees are: established use one pound of fer- tilizer three times a year for eacht inch of trunk diameter. Fertilize the trees with 10-10-10 in late February, again in mid- April and finally in late June. Keep fertilizer away from the trunk to avoid burning the roots. Prune your mayhaws for the first two or three years to shape into a single trunk. The lowest branches should start 18 inches off the ground. Eventually prune off lower limbs up to 3 or 4 feet up the trunk. Mayhaw trees have thorns on new growth so have to be handled with care. Mayhaws are low maintenance, easy to care for na- tive small trees with showy white blossoms in early spring and col- orful fall leaf color. Unlike swamp mayhaws, graft- ed trees can be grown on high ground, There are several com- mercial varieties of mayhaws. Big Red (Crataegus opaca 'Big Red') is a 1ate blooming tree that the plant grows into a small tree and bears fruit that look Hke small crab apples. avoids frost damage. The fragrant red berries are very large, up to 3/4ths of an inch around. Perfec- tion (Crataegus opaca 'Perfec- tion') is another late bloomer that produces one-inch berries that are bright red outside with a fragrant red pulp. Mason (Crataegus opaca 'Ma- son') is also called 'Texas Super- berry.' This is another large bright red berry that hangs in grape like clusters. "Red and Yellow" (Crataegus aestivalis 'Red and Yellow:) is a very heavy bearing almost inde- structible tree. The oblong fruit have sunny yellow skin and yel- low pulp. Texas Star (Crataegus opaca 'Texas Star') blooms late so avoids most frost damage. The medium sized berries are reddish- orange. Texas Star fruits in clus- ters of seven or more berries. Mayhaws :fruit on ,last year's limbs or spurs. You can increase your harvest substantially im- proved by pruning to let sunshine throughout the branches. A little pruning during the fall can do this. You can oder mayhaw trees from specialty nurseries such as Ty Ty Nursery, P.O. Box 130, Ty- Ty, GA. 31795, or Edible Land- scaping, 361 Spirit Ridge Lane, Afton, VA 22920. When your mayhaws begin to produce they can shower you with up to 85 gallons of berries from each tree. Berries that you can make into famous mayhaw jelly, mayhaw cakes and even mayhaw wines. And since mayhaws ripen over a few weeks they're perfect for the gardener who tends to hem and haw. Paul Barbano writes about gar- dening and farming from his home in Rehoboth Beach. Address questions or comments to him c/o the Cape Gazette. l-Iere's how you can have the best lawn on your block this summer For many homeowners, there's nothing prettier than a gorgeous green, lush lawn for the summer. One major factor to ensure the health and aesthetics of a lawn is proper watering. While it's not as simple as aiming a hose at the grass and spraying, having a beautiful lawn can be achieved with a little time, effort and know-how. "It's possible to have a beautiful lawn Was summer tlr'ie ctmservf atL and re- specting local water ordinances at the same time," said Randall Best, owner of Best Ace Hardware. Best offers these helpful tips for watering techniques that will improve a lawn. Water only when the lawn needs it. Wa- ter the lawn when soil lgins to dry out and before the grass wilts. The soil is dry when a footprint leaves a longlasting imprint in- stead of bouncing right back. A bluish- green cast is often an indicator of wilting. Lawns require about an inch of water a week. if it rains, don't water. Overwatering your lawn flushes .nutrients away, making time spent watering a wasted effort. Soak sail deeply. It's neceasry to get past the ground surface and soak the roots of the grass. Soaking the roots helps the lawn become more draught-tolerant. Water should penetrate the lawn about six to eight inches deep. If the lawn is watered more deeply, it can be watered less frequently. Avoid watering in the heal ofthe day. The ideal time for watering the  is ear- ly in the morning, when it increases the likelihood that water will penetrate into the soil instead of evaporating. Watering in di- rect sunlight harms the grass, as water droplets intensify the sun's heat, causing .scalding and burn damage. Also, avoid wa- tering at night. Darkness, warm tempera- tures and moisture attract insects and in- crease the development of fungal diseases. Maintain lawn maintenance. To reduce watering, maintain a 2-3-inch grass height. Use mulches like bark or pine straw around trees and bushes, Remove weeds that com- pemfor waterth the surrounding grass. ,Pick the best watering tool for your lawn and your lifestyle. Larger diameter hoses - 3/4-inch hoses - deliver almost one and a half times as much water as a 5/8- inch hose and 2 l/4-inch times as much wa- ter as a l/2-inch hose. Soaker hoses provide a slow, even flow of water into the ground. Sprinklers are great for watering large patches of grass at once and allow for ad- justing the spray distance and strength of water flow. An in-ground sprinkler system with timer is ttie creme de a creme in water- ing systems, distributing water evenly and consistently, while preventing overwater- ing, water and erosion. Continued on page 97 96 - CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, June 4 - June 10, 2004 GARDEN & FARM GARDEN JOURNAL Paul Barbano Hemming and hawing around the garde00 Japan had Tokyo Rose and Hitler had William Joyce. In 1939 Joyce began work with the Nazi German Radio Corporation as an English language broadcast- er. But ahem, as a proper Brit might stage whisper to get one's attention, he wasn't widely ac- cepted. "Ahem," the gentle clearing of the throat is an imitative word, much like the imitative word for snooty speech, the whining mock of "haw haw." So William Joyce was described as "English of the haw-haw, damn-it-get-out-of-my-way vari- ety." Thereafter Joyce was mocked as "Lord Haw-Haw." The Old English word "haga," perhaps the same word for "hedge" gives us the American "haw," the fruit of the hedgerow hawthorn tree. And what better name for a haw that ripens in spring than the mayhaw (Cratae- gus aestivalis, C. rufula, or C. opaca.) Mayhaws are tart red berries that grow wild in the swamps and Mayhaws are tart red berries that grow wild in the swamps and begs of the American South. A distant COUSin of the rose, bogs of the American South. A distant cousin Of the rose, the plant grows into a small tree and bears fruit that look like small crab apples. Plant mayhaws 18 to 20 feet apart in partly shaded sites as an understory tree beneath tall trees. Mix peat moss into the soil and set the trees at the same depth they grew in the nursery. Form a ridge or a basin around the planting hole to collect water. Mayhaws prefer moist to wet soil, but adjust well to drier soil. For best results your soil should have a pH 6.0to 6.5. The trees need about one inch of water per week during the growing season. Mttyhaws are Surprisingly hardy in USDA Zones-6-9, but they will die if the temperature goes to 20. below zero. Once your trees are: established use one pound of fer- tilizer three times a year for eacht inch of trunk diameter. Fertilize the trees with 10-10-10 in late February, again in mid- April and finally in late June. Keep fertilizer away from the trunk to avoid burning the roots. Prune your mayhaws for the first two or three years to shape into a single trunk. The lowest branches should start 18 inches off the ground. Eventually prune off lower limbs up to 3 or 4 feet up the trunk. Mayhaw trees have thorns on new growth so have to be handled with care. Mayhaws are low maintenance, easy to care for na- tive small trees with showy white blossoms in early spring and col- orful fall leaf color. Unlike swamp mayhaws, graft- ed trees can be grown on high ground, There are several com- mercial varieties of mayhaws. Big Red (Crataegus opaca 'Big Red') is a 1ate blooming tree that the plant grows into a small tree and bears fruit that look Hke small crab apples. avoids frost damage. The fragrant red berries are very large, up to 3/4ths of an inch around. Perfec- tion (Crataegus opaca 'Perfec- tion') is another late bloomer that produces one-inch berries that are bright red outside with a fragrant red pulp. Mason (Crataegus opaca 'Ma- son') is also called 'Texas Super- berry.' This is another large bright red berry that hangs in grape like clusters. "Red and Yellow" (Crataegus aestivalis 'Red and Yellow:) is a very heavy bearing almost inde- structible tree. The oblong fruit have sunny yellow skin and yel- low pulp. Texas Star (Crataegus opaca 'Texas Star') blooms late so avoids most frost damage. The medium sized berries are reddish- orange. Texas Star fruits in clus- ters of seven or more berries. Mayhaws :fruit on ,last year's limbs or spurs. You can increase your harvest substantially im- proved by pruning to let sunshine throughout the branches. A little pruning during the fall can do this. You can oder mayhaw trees from specialty nurseries such as Ty Ty Nursery, P.O. Box 130, Ty- Ty, GA. 31795, or Edible Land- scaping, 361 Spirit Ridge Lane, Afton, VA 22920. When your mayhaws begin to produce they can shower you with up to 85 gallons of berries from each tree. Berries that you can make into famous mayhaw jelly, mayhaw cakes and even mayhaw wines. And since mayhaws ripen over a few weeks they're perfect for the gardener who tends to hem and haw. Paul Barbano writes about gar- dening and farming from his home in Rehoboth Beach. Address questions or comments to him c/o the Cape Gazette. l-Iere's how you can have the best lawn on your block this summer For many homeowners, there's nothing prettier than a gorgeous green, lush lawn for the summer. One major factor to ensure the health and aesthetics of a lawn is proper watering. While it's not as simple as aiming a hose at the grass and spraying, having a beautiful lawn can be achieved with a little time, effort and know-how. "It's possible to have a beautiful lawn Was summer tlr'ie ctmservf atL and re- specting local water ordinances at the same time," said Randall Best, owner of Best Ace Hardware. Best offers these helpful tips for watering techniques that will improve a lawn. Water only when the lawn needs it. Wa- ter the lawn when soil lgins to dry out and before the grass wilts. The soil is dry when a footprint leaves a longlasting imprint in- stead of bouncing right back. A bluish- green cast is often an indicator of wilting. Lawns require about an inch of water a week. if it rains, don't water. Overwatering your lawn flushes .nutrients away, making time spent watering a wasted effort. Soak sail deeply. It's neceasry to get past the ground surface and soak the roots of the grass. Soaking the roots helps the lawn become more draught-tolerant. Water should penetrate the lawn about six to eight inches deep. If the lawn is watered more deeply, it can be watered less frequently. Avoid watering in the heal ofthe day. The ideal time for watering the  is ear- ly in the morning, when it increases the likelihood that water will penetrate into the soil instead of evaporating. Watering in di- rect sunlight harms the grass, as water droplets intensify the sun's heat, causing .scalding and burn damage. Also, avoid wa- tering at night. Darkness, warm tempera- tures and moisture attract insects and in- crease the development of fungal diseases. Maintain lawn maintenance. To reduce watering, maintain a 2-3-inch grass height. Use mulches like bark or pine straw around trees and bushes, Remove weeds that com- pemfor waterth the surrounding grass. ,Pick the best watering tool for your lawn and your lifestyle. Larger diameter hoses - 3/4-inch hoses - deliver almost one and a half times as much water as a 5/8- inch hose and 2 l/4-inch times as much wa- ter as a l/2-inch hose. Soaker hoses provide a slow, even flow of water into the ground. Sprinklers are great for watering large patches of grass at once and allow for ad- justing the spray distance and strength of water flow. An in-ground sprinkler system with timer is ttie creme de a creme in water- ing systems, distributing water evenly and consistently, while preventing overwater- ing, water and erosion. Continued on page 97