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Lewes, Delaware
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June 20, 1997     Cape Gazette
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June 20, 1997
 

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CAPE GAZETYE, Friday, June 21) - June 26,1997 - 51 BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE Rehoboth's Residence at Seaside breaks ground By Michael Short Lt. Governor Ruth Ann Minner told the audience that she knows all about assisted living. A few weeks after knee surgery, Minner arrived on crutches to dedicate the first area assisted living facility on Monday near Kmart. The Residence at Seaside will provide housing for 100 older res- idents in a facility that stresses comfort and independent living. The idea is to provide housing f6r residents who want to live inde- pendently, but who still need some assistance with day-to-day chores. It's considered a rising trend in health care which is being developed jointly by Dyer McCrea Ventures L.L.C. and National Health Management (NHM) Inc. "It is an alternative living arrangement for people who need a little help getting along," said Eugene Bartolini, executive vice president in charge of development for National Health Management. "'We have watched the trends and learned from those trends," Bartolini said. Assisted living facilities are for seniors who need a little extra assistance, but who are basically independent. That could mean, for example, help preparing meals or in dressing themselves. "Ask me about the need for assisted living," joked Minner, who said that such facilities can help otherwise active and vigor- ous seniors maintain a high quali- ty of life. "They will not have that fear at night.[The fear of] suppose something happens and I can not get up," she said. "May God bless this residence, all these people involved and all the people stay- ing here." Amenities at the 100-residence facility adjacent to Lighthouse Plaza include a sun room, library, pub and card room and ice cream parlor. There are 95 suites and the emphasis is on homey with fire- places, living areas and fine din- ing. "The level of enthusiasm at NHM is unparalleled for the opportunity to work with profes- sionals like Dyer McCrea L.L.C. and in a community with the her- itage and stature of Rehoboth Beach," said Eric Roberson, national director of marketing for NHM. "We are also excited about the opportunity to provide high quality assisted living services to the wonderful people of Rehoboth Beach and surrounding communi- ties." For more information, con- tact 412-578-7800 or 645-5555. Angle Moon photo The Residence at Seaside, the first assisted living facility in the Cape region, broke ground on Route 1 near Kmart on Monday, June 16. Shown breaking ground for the facility are (l-r) Sussex County Councilman Finley Jones, State Rep. John Schroeder (D-Lewes), Executive Vice President of Development and Aquisition for National Health Management, Inc. Eugene Bartolini, Lt. Governor Ruth Ann Minner, Sussex County Councilman Lynn Rogers, Sussex County Council President Dale Dukes, Pret Dyer, a partner in Dyer McCrea Ventures L.L.C., Dyer McCrea Ventures partner Gary McCrea and Sussex County Administrator Bob Stickels. The assisted living facility, designed for older residents who need some assistance with chores such as dressing or meal preparation, is a joint effort by Dyer-McCrea and National Health Management and is expected to open in approximately a year. Milton Chamber elects Harris as president in close June 17 election The new president is joined by Don Post, vice president, Debbie Spencer, secretary, and Donna Johnson, parliamentarian. Elected to the board of directors are Tony Boyd-Heron and Pauline Wilson. After being sworn in, Harris thanked members for having faith in his ability to lead the group, and he reminded them of the importance of working as a unit. "We all have a common purpose here," he said. "We need to promote existing busi- nesses and attract new ones. "I love Milton. I chose to move here and make an investment in a business." Harris said treating everyone with fair- ness is very important to him, and he wants to help maintain open lines of communica- tion within the chamber. After owning busi- nesses in Washington, D.C. and Pennsylva- nia, he moved to Milton three years ago. He said one of his first chores will be to familiarize himself with all of the chamber members. In his opinion, it will be as important to try to get previous members to return as it is to attract new ones. He said Milton is definitely going to grow, and the chamber can take a role in making the growth comfortable and positive for the town. "As a business owner, I have a lot of enthusiasm, and I want what's best for the town. I think a lot of people have great ideas for the town; we have to get together and discuss things and make planned moves," he said. A frequent visitor to Milton Town Coun- cil meetings, Harris said he wants more cooperation and collaboration with city Continued on page 52 By Rosanne Pack There have been some up and down moments for the Milton Chamber of Com- merce in the last year; however, the new officers and new members of the board of directors are confident that the organization will be facing a lot more ups than downs in the coming months. A co-owner of A Walk Through Time, Ed Harris was sworn in as president of the board after June 17 elections. Harris and candidate Jim Clark were only a few votes apart in voting that drew almost 40 votes. Summer job provides money management Most children spell summer "V- A-C-A-T-I-O-N," but for a. few young enterprising souls, it's also spelled, "M-O-N-E-Y." Summer jobs give many preteens access to cold, hard, cash. This windfall presents parents with a great opportunity to teach their kids about spending, saving and sharing. Here are some tips on how to begin a conversation about money management with your child: Talk about money. Do your children know where your money comes from? How you earn it? Show them what a paycheck looks like and how taxes are taken out ' ? .... each peri0d Discuss your budget. Explain how you pay y eiur bills and how you spend your money. Talk about .! .... : : -- the amount you put in savings and the amount you share. Help them establish a budget for their allowance and income. Teach your children the impor- tance of saving, spending and sharing by helping them establish a budget for the allowance or income they earn. Show them how you share your money. Explain to your children how you decide which charitable organizations you support. Involve your kids in making con- tributions from their allowances or earnings to a charity that you chose together. Explain to them how this money serves real needs. The enthusiasm that" you show in your giving will spill over to your children. Explain how you save for a goal. Talk about the ways you save money in order to reach a financial goal. Use specific exam- ples - your family vacation, the new mini-van, your home corn- puter - to help your kids under- stand the relevance of saving money in your lives. And don't forget to discuss the importance of a cash reserve. Discuss wants versus needs. Help your children understand the difference between wants and needs. Discuss advertising mes- sages that can blur this distinction. Take your children shopping. Show your children how to com- pare prices, making sure you keep track of the money you save by comparison shopping. Show your children a credit card statement. It is important that your kids understand that buying on credit is not free. Tell them why you use credit and when it is appropriate. Establish a custotlial account. Let your children use the account while you oversee deposit and withdrawals. Make sure that they are activity involved in those transactions. Whether they earn it by mowing lawns, baby-sitting or washing cars, it is important for your kids to understand how to manage responsibilities that come with money. The best way for your children to learn about money management is for you to talk about spending, saving and shar- ing, and then walk-your-talk in your daily financial decisions. This column is presented as a public service by Lutheran Broth- erhood, represented.in the Del- marva area by Glen Sholley. Glenn Shelley .... r l IIT]IIlNq)RHlllIE'ITllTHI1HIfllTNEIlIINHITNTTTVITIIIIH iI']ITIITIVTTT "