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Lewes, Delaware
Jim's Towing Service
July 20, 2004     Cape Gazette
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Continued from page 6 a worthy, responsible and well done project. Walter W. Brittingham Rehoboth Beach Rehoboth Main Street thanks contributors Rehoboth Beach Main Street, Inc. would like to say a huge thanks' to all of our wonderful fireworks contributors - You helped make Fireworks 2004 a blast. Hundreds and hundreds of businesses and individuals con- tributed. The fireworks show is funded entirely by private contri- butions and we thank each and every donor. And thanks also goes to the Fireworks Committee under the leadership of Kathy McGuiness. Kathy has been the person in charge of all the coordination be- tween government agencies, the fireworks company and the barge company over the past eight years. Thanks also go to Jack Lingo Realty for loaning us the field across from Jungle Jim's for use as our shuttle lot this year and the Kiwanis Club for running the parking operation. Thanks to Captain Evie Sim- mons and crew for getting the py- rotechnician to the barge, and thanks to the official volunteers who helped us collect money from the crowd before and after the show. Of course, special thanks go the Rehoboth Fire Department (and other crews which volunteer for us), local and state police, Re- hoboth city manager Greg Fer- rese, parking department staff, DART bus coordinators, the Jolly Trolley, the Coast Guard, Re- hoboth Beach Patrol, scads of vol- unteers, the mayor and commis- sioners and the City of Rehoboth Beach. Getting 80,000 (it may have been more this year) people in and out of town is some task and our volunteers and public safety officials did a terrific job. We thank them for their dedica- tion and patience. Rehoboth Po- lice Chief Banks and Troop 7 State Police Commander Nolt are our champions. It was truly a community effort and we know that our residents and visitors en- joyed the show. And once again, thanks to Mother Nature for holding the rain off until after the fireworks - just after. Frankly, I think the huge Zambelli finale spurred those rain clouds into action. Thanks again everybody. Fay Jacobs Executive director Rehoboth Beach Main Street Inc. Dewey large businesses have always been there The purpose of this letter is to express thanks and support for large businesses in Dewey Beach. Everyone needs to pay their fair share and this group of businesses has over the past 20 years done just that. Even though the owner- ship of these businesses (Star- hoard, Rusty Rudder, Northbeach, Waterfront, etc) has changed over the years, the commitment contin- ues to Support town programs and needs through thick and thin. They have acute business knowl- edge and have helped the town re- main fmancially strong. Examples of their actions are numerous. Back in the earlier Dewey days, when the town would have a shortfall in the year- ly budget, they would go to the businesses/bars and everyone would pull together and raise the necessary money so that the town CAPE GAZETTE, Tuesday, July 20 - July 22, 2004 - 7 " Photo Courtesy Lewlm Historical Society Archives Crew members of the Cape Henlopen Life Saving Station The Cape Henlopen Life-Saving Station was established in 1876 and was located less than a mile south of Cape Henlopen Light. Established along with the Indian River Station, the men of the station worked primarily the winter months when shipwrecks would be more preva- lent along our coast, risking life and limb to save survivors of wrecks from Lewes to Fenwiek Island. The Life-Saving Service merged with the Revenue Cutter Service in 1915 to form to- day's modern Coast Guard. Pictured is the crew of the Cape Henlopen Station c. 1890-1900. could continue to operate. When the police department was first es- tablished the bars and restaurants each donhted $2,000. Even though currently they pay by far the highest business license fee in the country, they continue to raise and donate large amounts of money voluntarily. These ef- forts are wide ranging and impact many programs and needs. Just this past Week the Starhoard spon- sored the 'Running of the Bulls'. This not only generated a very positive article in the Washington Post but also raised over $5,000 for a donatiofl to the police de- partment and lifeguards. On a continuing basis these large businesses donate thousands and thousands of dollars for either one-time events or for on-going programs. To site a few, DB Ju- nior Lifeguards, beautification and holiday committees, Sunset Park, renovation of the Life Sav- ing Station and the new Town Hall have all received donations. Plus, these businesses are most generous to organizations and community needs outside of Dewey. ' Highway One Partner- ship, for example, which owns several large businesses in town through their six road races con- tributes over $8,000 to Beebe Medical Center charities. In conclusion, this cooperative group of businesses have been a long-standing team player and member in the Dewey community and it was a pleasure working with them as an elected official for ten years. Bob Frederick Dewey Beach Mayor 1994 - 2002 Cut It Out comes to salons to stop domestic violence Overt he time I have beenAttor- them about assistance that is tion and Clairol Professional with lence advocates will team with ney General, I have expanded re- sources within my office available to victims of crime, including do- mestic violence victims. We have a specialized unit including spe- cially trained prosecutors to han- dle domestic violence cases. We have worked to implement, and trained on, a prosecution model that doesn't put victims at greater risk. We've worked to address daring violence and violence in the work- place and have reached out to Delaware's clergy, training them about the dynamics of domestic violence, what resources are available to victims and helping guide their advice to the persons and families they serve. The reason I have addressed the issue in so many different ways is because domestic violence vic- tims are all ages, in all locations and have many interests. Soon we will implement a new statewide program to utilize yet another av- COMMENTARY JANE BRADY enue for education, awareness and support. The new domestic violence awareness and education program is titled, Cut It Out: Salons Against Domestic Violence. I am excited by the unique approach of the program- offering education sessions to hair and nail salon pro- fessionals about the dynamics of domestic violence and informing available to victims in their com- munities. I contacted the national sponsors of the training and asked that Delaware be considered as a target state for this new program. Delaware is fortunate to have been chosen by the national part- hers as one of the first states to be able to offer this training to its sa- lon professionals. I know from experience that sa: Ion professionals are aware that some of their clients are in abu: sive relationships. This training will help salon professionals .rec- ognize signs of domestic violence and learn about local resources that can help. In addition to training sessions, the project provides posters and brochures for salons to display to raise awareness and provide infor- marion to clients. The initiative was launched na- tionally by a partnership between Southern Living at HOME, the National Cosmetology Associa- funding from the Salons Against Domestic Abuse Fund, a nonprof- it entity. The Cut It Out program began in Alabama as a partnership between the Alabama Coalition Against Domestic Violence and the Greater Birmingham Women's Fund. The executive director of Southern Living at HOME, who is also a member of the Women's Fund, envisioned the expansion of the Alabama program to salons around the country. In Delaware, the Attorney Gen- eral's Office, the Delaware Coali- tion Against Domestic Violence and the Delaware Board of Cos- metology and Barbering are work- ing to bring the Cut It Out pro- gram to local salons. We formed a .............. Committee of salon owners to assist in the planning and implementation of the train- ing and have held initial meetings. We hope to offer trainings around the state to salon professionals lat- er this year. Local domestic vio- specially trained members of the National Cosmetology Associa- tion to offer the training sessions. This project is not designed to make counselors out of hair- dressers or nail technicians. But we all know that salon profession- als do offer a listening ear to their clients. By giving them informa- tion and resource materials, we hope that salon professionals in Delaware will be better able to spot the signs of domestic vio- lence and offer resources to their clients to help them break free from an abusive situation. Mention this program and the trainings at your salon next time you are getting a hair cut or your nails done. Encourage them to participate. We'll be sending out a notice about the trainings to all licensed salons. For more information about the national Cut It Out program, visit our office's website at www.state.de.us/attgen. Continued from page 6 a worthy, responsible and well done project. Walter W. Brittingham Rehoboth Beach Rehoboth Main Street thanks contributors Rehoboth Beach Main Street, Inc. would like to say a huge thanks' to all of our wonderful fireworks contributors - You helped make Fireworks 2004 a blast. Hundreds and hundreds of businesses and individuals con- tributed. The fireworks show is funded entirely by private contri- butions and we thank each and every donor. And thanks also goes to the Fireworks Committee under the leadership of Kathy McGuiness. Kathy has been the person in charge of all the coordination be- tween government agencies, the fireworks company and the barge company over the past eight years. Thanks also go to Jack Lingo Realty for loaning us the field across from Jungle Jim's for use as our shuttle lot this year and the Kiwanis Club for running the parking operation. Thanks to Captain Evie Sim- mons and crew for getting the py- rotechnician to the barge, and thanks to the official volunteers who helped us collect money from the crowd before and after the show. Of course, special thanks go the Rehoboth Fire Department (and other crews which volunteer for us), local and state police, Re- hoboth city manager Greg Fer- rese, parking department staff, DART bus coordinators, the Jolly Trolley, the Coast Guard, Re- hoboth Beach Patrol, scads of vol- unteers, the mayor and commis- sioners and the City of Rehoboth Beach. Getting 80,000 (it may have been more this year) people in and out of town is some task and our volunteers and public safety officials did a terrific job. We thank them for their dedica- tion and patience. Rehoboth Po- lice Chief Banks and Troop 7 State Police Commander Nolt are our champions. It was truly a community effort and we know that our residents and visitors en- joyed the show. And once again, thanks to Mother Nature for holding the rain off until after the fireworks - just after. Frankly, I think the huge Zambelli finale spurred those rain clouds into action. Thanks again everybody. Fay Jacobs Executive director Rehoboth Beach Main Street Inc. Dewey large businesses have always been there The purpose of this letter is to express thanks and support for large businesses in Dewey Beach. Everyone needs to pay their fair share and this group of businesses has over the past 20 years done just that. Even though the owner- ship of these businesses (Star- hoard, Rusty Rudder, Northbeach, Waterfront, etc) has changed over the years, the commitment contin- ues to Support town programs and needs through thick and thin. They have acute business knowl- edge and have helped the town re- main fmancially strong. Examples of their actions are numerous. Back in the earlier Dewey days, when the town would have a shortfall in the year- ly budget, they would go to the businesses/bars and everyone would pull together and raise the necessary money so that the town CAPE GAZETTE, Tuesday, July 20 - July 22, 2004 - 7 " Photo Courtesy Lewlm Historical Society Archives Crew members of the Cape Henlopen Life Saving Station The Cape Henlopen Life-Saving Station was established in 1876 and was located less than a mile south of Cape Henlopen Light. Established along with the Indian River Station, the men of the station worked primarily the winter months when shipwrecks would be more preva- lent along our coast, risking life and limb to save survivors of wrecks from Lewes to Fenwiek Island. The Life-Saving Service merged with the Revenue Cutter Service in 1915 to form to- day's modern Coast Guard. Pictured is the crew of the Cape Henlopen Station c. 1890-1900. could continue to operate. When the police department was first es- tablished the bars and restaurants each donhted $2,000. Even though currently they pay by far the highest business license fee in the country, they continue to raise and donate large amounts of money voluntarily. These ef- forts are wide ranging and impact many programs and needs. Just this past Week the Starhoard spon- sored the 'Running of the Bulls'. This not only generated a very positive article in the Washington Post but also raised over $5,000 for a donatiofl to the police de- partment and lifeguards. On a continuing basis these large businesses donate thousands and thousands of dollars for either one-time events or for on-going programs. To site a few, DB Ju- nior Lifeguards, beautification and holiday committees, Sunset Park, renovation of the Life Sav- ing Station and the new Town Hall have all received donations. Plus, these businesses are most generous to organizations and community needs outside of Dewey. ' Highway One Partner- ship, for example, which owns several large businesses in town through their six road races con- tributes over $8,000 to Beebe Medical Center charities. In conclusion, this cooperative group of businesses have been a long-standing team player and member in the Dewey community and it was a pleasure working with them as an elected official for ten years. Bob Frederick Dewey Beach Mayor 1994 - 2002 Cut It Out comes to salons to stop domestic violence Overt he time I have beenAttor- them about assistance that is tion and Clairol Professional with lence advocates will team with ney General, I have expanded re- sources within my office available to victims of crime, including do- mestic violence victims. We have a specialized unit including spe- cially trained prosecutors to han- dle domestic violence cases. We have worked to implement, and trained on, a prosecution model that doesn't put victims at greater risk. We've worked to address daring violence and violence in the work- place and have reached out to Delaware's clergy, training them about the dynamics of domestic violence, what resources are available to victims and helping guide their advice to the persons and families they serve. The reason I have addressed the issue in so many different ways is because domestic violence vic- tims are all ages, in all locations and have many interests. Soon we will implement a new statewide program to utilize yet another av- COMMENTARY JANE BRADY enue for education, awareness and support. The new domestic violence awareness and education program is titled, Cut It Out: Salons Against Domestic Violence. I am excited by the unique approach of the program- offering education sessions to hair and nail salon pro- fessionals about the dynamics of domestic violence and informing available to victims in their com- munities. I contacted the national sponsors of the training and asked that Delaware be considered as a target state for this new program. Delaware is fortunate to have been chosen by the national part- hers as one of the first states to be able to offer this training to its sa- lon professionals. I know from experience that sa: Ion professionals are aware that some of their clients are in abu: sive relationships. This training will help salon professionals .rec- ognize signs of domestic violence and learn about local resources that can help. In addition to training sessions, the project provides posters and brochures for salons to display to raise awareness and provide infor- marion to clients. The initiative was launched na- tionally by a partnership between Southern Living at HOME, the National Cosmetology Associa- funding from the Salons Against Domestic Abuse Fund, a nonprof- it entity. The Cut It Out program began in Alabama as a partnership between the Alabama Coalition Against Domestic Violence and the Greater Birmingham Women's Fund. The executive director of Southern Living at HOME, who is also a member of the Women's Fund, envisioned the expansion of the Alabama program to salons around the country. In Delaware, the Attorney Gen- eral's Office, the Delaware Coali- tion Against Domestic Violence and the Delaware Board of Cos- metology and Barbering are work- ing to bring the Cut It Out pro- gram to local salons. We formed a .............. Committee of salon owners to assist in the planning and implementation of the train- ing and have held initial meetings. We hope to offer trainings around the state to salon professionals lat- er this year. Local domestic vio- specially trained members of the National Cosmetology Associa- tion to offer the training sessions. This project is not designed to make counselors out of hair- dressers or nail technicians. But we all know that salon profession- als do offer a listening ear to their clients. By giving them informa- tion and resource materials, we hope that salon professionals in Delaware will be better able to spot the signs of domestic vio- lence and offer resources to their clients to help them break free from an abusive situation. Mention this program and the trainings at your salon next time you are getting a hair cut or your nails done. Encourage them to participate. We'll be sending out a notice about the trainings to all licensed salons. For more information about the national Cut It Out program, visit our office's website at www.state.de.us/attgen.