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July 20, 2004     Cape Gazette
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10. CAPE GAZETTE, Tuesday, July 20 - July 22, 2004 Trooper00 Continued from pige 1 I Lt. Joe Aviola, State police spokesman, said Healy was travel- ing northbound on Roate 1 shortly before 2 a.m., when ;he failed to stop for a red light at the Route 16 intersection. "Hea!y's vehicle struck the right rear of the 1993 Buick operated by Barbara Bradley, 28, of Dover," said Aviola. Bradley had been turning eastbound onto Rodte 16 from southbound Route li. "Bradley sustained a minor iOjury to her hand and was trahsported to Milford Memorial Hqspital, where she was treated and r Aviola said the immediately put ot broadcast about He; and the direction it w ing, and a nearby tr( at that crash site aln ately. The trooper s Healy's car had trm grassy median and sl way sign before co northbound, into the lane. Healy traveled in for about nff'e mil, ;leased." 911 center t a general tly s vehicle ts likely flee- oper arrived Lost immedi- aw evidence 'eled on the ruck a high- atinuing on, southbound that manner s, at which point Shea's patrol car was round- ing a slight curve. :. Aviola said police believe he my have seen the oncoming vehic!e at the last second and tried to steer away from it but was unabl to avoid the collision. "After impact, the ed counterclockwise onto the shoulder," "The Toyota als0 rot clockwise and came grass median. Withe the Toyota to be tray( rate of speed." Both cruiser rotat- and traveled said Aviola. ated counter- to rest in the sses reported ling at a high drivers were wearing seat belts; there were no passengers in either vehicle. Preliminary results of the Fatal Accident Investigation and Reconstruction (FAIR) team indi- cate Healy was under the influ- ence of alcohol at tle time of the crash. According [to Delaware Department of MOtor Vehicle records, Healy facedia DUI charge in 1989 and again !n 2001. His license Was revokediin July 2001, he completed DUI rehabilitation in 2002, and the revocation was lifted shortly thereafter. His dri- ver's license was issued in April 2003, and he had no points on it at the time of the fatal crash. Trooper beloved Shea, 31, of Delaware State Police Troop 7, was a devoted family man and a highly esteemed law enforcement officer. The for- mer U.S. Marine came from a large family in New Jersey and married Susan Cleaver Shea of Lewes. Shea, the father of 3-year- old son Christopher Jr. and l 1- month-old Elizabeth, was also embraced by a large police family. "It's a devastating loss for this division, the family and friends - Dan Cook photo Gov. Ruth Ann Minner de- clared, June 19, that all U.S. and state flags be flown at half staff, in memory of the fallen officer, until sunset of his funeral. "Delaware State Police pledge to protect and serve the public, and they know that means putting their lives on the line for the rest of us," said Minner. "The tragic loss of Cpl. Christo- pher Shea has illustrated that unselfishness yet again. Delaware and I have been stunned by this loss and can only pray for the family that is left behind, especially Cpl. Shea's two young children." Shown is state police head- quarters in Dover. even tougher because it's so sense, less," said Col. L. Aaron Chaffinch, state police superin- tendent. "Every person who has ever worn this uniform, whether past or present, is affected by this. It's traumatic for everyone. Chris was a good, good guy. It's very hard." "It is hard for all of us," said Troop 7 Cmdr. Capt. Greg Nolt, . "but we're a family, and we'll get through this like all families do." Cpl. Dan Salfas, formerly of Troop 7 and now at Troop 1, was one of Shea's closest friends. The two developed their brotherhood when they were bunk mates at the state police academy in 2000. "This was one thing he always wanted - to be a trooper," said Salfas. "It's almost like when he was in the Marines. He always knew what he wanted." "He was just happy to be a trooper," said Cpl, Hudson Keller, another classmate and a shift mate with Shea at Troop 7. "He was tickled about that. He was a real- ly hard worker." When Sbea started at Troop 7, be said he had one main reason for entering a career in law enforce- ment. "I chose police work as a profession in an effort to help those who find themselves in a sit- uation outside their control," Shea said in May 2003. "Chris strived to be the best in the state police, but he was a real big team person," said Salfas. "He always brought other people up to make sure they did their best." Salfas said once they graduated and were assigned to troops, his friend quickly became known as a man who would put forth the extra effort to help his colleagueg.. Shea's first assignment was at Troop 5 ila Bridgeville, from where he transferred to Troop 7 in the spring of 2003. Salfas recalled a night Shea was en route to a Maryland hospital to follow up on a case. While he headed down from Troop" 5, he came upon a crash scene. He stopped and started working at it, collecting information, until the trooper assigned to it an'ived. That act delayed his Own case and ulti- mately lengthenP..d his shift, but helping a victim and another offi- cer was his priority, said Salfas. "You could count on him - always in all kinds of circumstances," he said. "You need to be able to depend on people in this job." However dedicated Shea was to the division and to his job, his friends also loved him for his sense of humor. "He was a talker," said Keller. "He couldtalk until the bark fell off the tree." "You know how there are some people who can tell a story, and some people who can't?" queried Salfas. "He could. He would crack one-liners, He made us laugh. He loved Jimmy Buffet - all the time. One time we were sit- ting around [in the academy] talk- ing. Chris just gets up and starts doing the parrot dance. We see him doing it..." Salfas paused. "That's one of the things...one of the unexpected things he'd do." It wasn't long into his training that Shea earned the nickname The Colonel. "During Family Night, someone asked Chris what he foresaw himself doing in the state police. He answered, but his ever supportive wife added her own take on the situation. And you hear Susan saying 'And be also wants to be colonel,'" said Salfas, Continued on page 12 Debi Dernoga Altmlmu Lmdng Speclanst Rohoboth Beach DE 302-22-4076 - Office 888-217-5700 - Toll Free Less-than-Perfect Credit? Call Today Prior bankruptcy or foreclosure Limited Documentation Excessive Debt Wells Fargo Home Mortgage is a division o1 Wells Fargo Bank. N. 2004 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All Rights Reserved. AN INTEGRITY HOMES COMMUNITY Here's a rare and exciting opportunity: You can now own a superbly crafted home near the beach with a lake view--while enjoying the easygoing charm of small-town living. Just a short stroll from historic Milton, Diamond Overlook at Susax Acres offeis three different styles of homes on half-acre lots, starting at just $299,500. Bestbf all, each home offers a view of sparkling Diamond Pond, at the headwaters of the Broadkill River. Diamond Overlook is the perfect choice for your primary residence or as an investment property. Call today and arrange a visit--and prepa}e to be dazzled. INTEGRITY 10. CAPE GAZETTE, Tuesday, July 20 - July 22, 2004 Trooper00 Continued from pige 1 I Lt. Joe Aviola, State police spokesman, said Healy was travel- ing northbound on Roate 1 shortly before 2 a.m., when ;he failed to stop for a red light at the Route 16 intersection. "Hea!y's vehicle struck the right rear of the 1993 Buick operated by Barbara Bradley, 28, of Dover," said Aviola. Bradley had been turning eastbound onto Rodte 16 from southbound Route li. "Bradley sustained a minor iOjury to her hand and was trahsported to Milford Memorial Hqspital, where she was treated and r Aviola said the immediately put ot broadcast about He; and the direction it w ing, and a nearby tr( at that crash site aln ately. The trooper s Healy's car had trm grassy median and sl way sign before co northbound, into the lane. Healy traveled in for about nff'e mil, ;leased." 911 center t a general tly s vehicle ts likely flee- oper arrived Lost immedi- aw evidence 'eled on the ruck a high- atinuing on, southbound that manner s, at which point Shea's patrol car was round- ing a slight curve. :. Aviola said police believe he my have seen the oncoming vehic!e at the last second and tried to steer away from it but was unabl to avoid the collision. "After impact, the ed counterclockwise onto the shoulder," "The Toyota als0 rot clockwise and came grass median. Withe the Toyota to be tray( rate of speed." Both cruiser rotat- and traveled said Aviola. ated counter- to rest in the sses reported ling at a high drivers were wearing seat belts; there were no passengers in either vehicle. Preliminary results of the Fatal Accident Investigation and Reconstruction (FAIR) team indi- cate Healy was under the influ- ence of alcohol at tle time of the crash. According [to Delaware Department of MOtor Vehicle records, Healy facedia DUI charge in 1989 and again !n 2001. His license Was revokediin July 2001, he completed DUI rehabilitation in 2002, and the revocation was lifted shortly thereafter. His dri- ver's license was issued in April 2003, and he had no points on it at the time of the fatal crash. Trooper beloved Shea, 31, of Delaware State Police Troop 7, was a devoted family man and a highly esteemed law enforcement officer. The for- mer U.S. Marine came from a large family in New Jersey and married Susan Cleaver Shea of Lewes. Shea, the father of 3-year- old son Christopher Jr. and l 1- month-old Elizabeth, was also embraced by a large police family. "It's a devastating loss for this division, the family and friends - Dan Cook photo Gov. Ruth Ann Minner de- clared, June 19, that all U.S. and state flags be flown at half staff, in memory of the fallen officer, until sunset of his funeral. "Delaware State Police pledge to protect and serve the public, and they know that means putting their lives on the line for the rest of us," said Minner. "The tragic loss of Cpl. Christo- pher Shea has illustrated that unselfishness yet again. Delaware and I have been stunned by this loss and can only pray for the family that is left behind, especially Cpl. Shea's two young children." Shown is state police head- quarters in Dover. even tougher because it's so sense, less," said Col. L. Aaron Chaffinch, state police superin- tendent. "Every person who has ever worn this uniform, whether past or present, is affected by this. It's traumatic for everyone. Chris was a good, good guy. It's very hard." "It is hard for all of us," said Troop 7 Cmdr. Capt. Greg Nolt, . "but we're a family, and we'll get through this like all families do." Cpl. Dan Salfas, formerly of Troop 7 and now at Troop 1, was one of Shea's closest friends. The two developed their brotherhood when they were bunk mates at the state police academy in 2000. "This was one thing he always wanted - to be a trooper," said Salfas. "It's almost like when he was in the Marines. He always knew what he wanted." "He was just happy to be a trooper," said Cpl, Hudson Keller, another classmate and a shift mate with Shea at Troop 7. "He was tickled about that. He was a real- ly hard worker." When Sbea started at Troop 7, be said he had one main reason for entering a career in law enforce- ment. "I chose police work as a profession in an effort to help those who find themselves in a sit- uation outside their control," Shea said in May 2003. "Chris strived to be the best in the state police, but he was a real big team person," said Salfas. "He always brought other people up to make sure they did their best." Salfas said once they graduated and were assigned to troops, his friend quickly became known as a man who would put forth the extra effort to help his colleagueg.. Shea's first assignment was at Troop 5 ila Bridgeville, from where he transferred to Troop 7 in the spring of 2003. Salfas recalled a night Shea was en route to a Maryland hospital to follow up on a case. While he headed down from Troop" 5, he came upon a crash scene. He stopped and started working at it, collecting information, until the trooper assigned to it an'ived. That act delayed his Own case and ulti- mately lengthenP..d his shift, but helping a victim and another offi- cer was his priority, said Salfas. "You could count on him - always in all kinds of circumstances," he said. "You need to be able to depend on people in this job." However dedicated Shea was to the division and to his job, his friends also loved him for his sense of humor. "He was a talker," said Keller. "He couldtalk until the bark fell off the tree." "You know how there are some people who can tell a story, and some people who can't?" queried Salfas. "He could. He would crack one-liners, He made us laugh. He loved Jimmy Buffet - all the time. One time we were sit- ting around [in the academy] talk- ing. Chris just gets up and starts doing the parrot dance. We see him doing it..." Salfas paused. "That's one of the things...one of the unexpected things he'd do." It wasn't long into his training that Shea earned the nickname The Colonel. "During Family Night, someone asked Chris what he foresaw himself doing in the state police. He answered, but his ever supportive wife added her own take on the situation. And you hear Susan saying 'And be also wants to be colonel,'" said Salfas, Continued on page 12 Debi Dernoga Altmlmu Lmdng Speclanst Rohoboth Beach DE 302-22-4076 - Office 888-217-5700 - Toll Free Less-than-Perfect Credit? Call Today Prior bankruptcy or foreclosure Limited Documentation Excessive Debt Wells Fargo Home Mortgage is a division o1 Wells Fargo Bank. N. 2004 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All Rights Reserved. AN INTEGRITY HOMES COMMUNITY Here's a rare and exciting opportunity: You can now own a superbly crafted home near the beach with a lake view--while enjoying the easygoing charm of small-town living. Just a short stroll from historic Milton, Diamond Overlook at Susax Acres offeis three different styles of homes on half-acre lots, starting at just $299,500. Bestbf all, each home offers a view of sparkling Diamond Pond, at the headwaters of the Broadkill River. Diamond Overlook is the perfect choice for your primary residence or as an investment property. Call today and arrange a visit--and prepa}e to be dazzled. INTEGRITY