Newspaper Archive of
Cape Gazette
Lewes, Delaware
Jim's Towing Service
August 5, 1994     Cape Gazette
PAGE 3     (3 of 64 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 3     (3 of 64 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
August 5, 1994
 

Newspaper Archive of Cape Gazette produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Briefly Continued from page,2 On Monday, Aug. 1, Bill Jones, a biologist who works for the De- partment of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC), explained a cost shar- ing spraying program to Lewes Mayor and Council and residents of town who attended. The matter was raised because the large dead stalks of phragmites pose a fire danger which has arisen on occa- sion in the past to threaten homes along the marsh side of Lewes Beach. Most questions asked during the Aug. r meeting focused on the safety of the chemical used to kill phragrnites. Jones said the danger posed to wildlife is minimal. He noted that while tests show that it takes 5,600 milligrams of glyphosate (the active ingredient used to kill phragmites) per kilo- gram of body weight to kill test animals, it takes only 3,000 mil- ligrams of table salt per kilogram to kill off the same animals and only 53 milligrams of nicotine to develop the same toxicity. "Glyphosate is the most studied herbicide out there," said Jones. "It has caused no groundwater problems and no fish, wildlife, or bird kills we know of." He noted that the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) doesn't require certification to apply glyphosate. "It's just not consid- ered dangerous," he said. Jones noted that in Little Creek, east of Dover, the volunteer fire department burns off stands of phragmites each year to head off wild fires that could call them out in the middle of the night. No spraying is done there. In most cases, DNREC attempts to eradi- cate phragmites so that plant growth more beneficial to wildlife will be allowed to thrive. Jones said he didn't know what kind of vegetation would replace the Lewes beach phragmites because it has grown up on canal dredging spoils. For f'ne control, he said a swath 50 to 60 yards wide could be sprayed between the marsh- side houses of Lewes beach, leav- ing a narrow buffer to avoid hav- ing the herbicide killing off plant- ed shrubs and flowerS. Jones said there's still time this season to do the spraying if Lewes wants to go forward. The cost would be split between the town and state and would cost in the magnitude of $3,000 for two sprayings. Jones said the spraying would probably create a fire break for five years before more spray- ing would be needed. "It has caused no groundwater problems and no fish, wildlife, or bird kills we know of." He noted that the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) doesn't require certification to apply glyphosate. "It's just not consid- ered dangerous," he said. Jones noted that in Little Creek, east of Dover, the volunteer fire department burns off stands of plmigmites each year to head off wild fires that could call them out in the middle of the night. No spraying is done there. In most cases, DNREC attempts to eradi- cate phragmites so that plant growth more beneficial to wildlife will be allowed to thrive. Jones said he didn't know what kind of vegetation would replace the Lewes beach phragmites because it has grown up on canal dredging spoils. For fire control, he said a swath 50 to 60 yards wide could be sprayed between the marsh- side houses of Lewes beach, leav- ing a narrow buffer to avoid hav- ing the herbicide killing off plant- ed shrubs and flowers. Jones said there's still time this season to do the spraying if Lewes wants to go forward. The cost would be split between the town and state and would cost in the magnitude of $3,000 for two sprayings. Jones said the spraying would probably create a fire break for five years before more spray- ing would be needed. Resort businesses cited for child labor violations The Delaware Department of Labor uncovered a total of 55 child labor violations during an inspection of 210 businesses in the Rehohoth Beach and Dewey Beach area on July 27 and 28, ac- cording to a news release by the Department of Labor. The department found 39 mi- nors employed without employ- ment permits and 13 minors work- ing during prohibited hours, such as 14- and 15-year-olds working before 7 a.m. or after 9 p.m. In ad- dition, the department discovered three minors under the age of 14 employed in violation of the state's Child Labor Act. According to the news release, 167 workers under the age of 18 were employed at the businesses inspected. Eighty-four percent of the 57 businesses employing minors were found to be in violation of one or more provisions of the Child Labor Act. The Department of Labor will refer the violations to the Attorney General's office for appropriate legal action. Employers can be fined up to $10,000 for each viola- tion. The last child labor "sweep" of beach area businesses was con- ducted in August of 1990, when 180 businesses were inspected. The department found a total of 61 child labor violations. Two arrested after fight at Bottle & Cork Dewey Beach police arrested two adult males on Saturday, July 30, after they responded to a call i-egarding a fight in progress in the parking lot of the Bottle & Cork night club. Dewey Beach Police Chief Raymond P. Morrison Jr., who declined to release the names of the men, said both men were charged with disorderly conduct. Four arrested for altering Dewey parking permits Dewey Beach police arrested four people over the past weekend for altering weekly parking per- mits, according to Dewey Beach Police Chief Raymond P. Morri- son Jr. If convicted, those arrested face fines between $200 and $1,000 per offense and a criminal record. So far this summer, there have been more than a dozen peo- ple arrested for altering parking permits, Chief Morrison said. Dewey sets hearings on restaurant requests The Dewey Beach Town Com- missioners will hold public hear- ings on Friday, Aug. 12 on condi- tional use requests for outside ser- vice areas. The commissioners will hold a hearing on a request by Richard Robinson to build and op- erate a restaurant with alcoholic beverage consumption and an out- side service area on a vacant lot at 1901 Highway One. The site is lo- cated at the northwest corner of Highway One and Bellevue Street, across from the Bottle & Cork. Robinson said he plans to pro- vide nearly 200 seats in the restau- rant, which would include approx- imately 3,000 square feet of pa- tron area. About half of the restau- rant would be enclosed, and the remaining half of the facility would be open-air, he said. "It's a combination of indoors and outdoors," Robinson said. Plans call for two bar areas, one indoors and one outdoors. According to Dewey Beach Town Administrator William Rutherford, Robinson has revised his original site plan to meet the conditions outlined in the town's restaurant ordinance. Adopted in 1992, the ordinance requires new restaurants to dedicate a minimum of 65 percent of the patron area to permanent, seated dining as op- posed to a bar area. It also man- dates that nev restaurants close outside service areas by 11 p.m. Robinson has also modified his site plan to provide for additional parking, as required by town code. He proposes to lease the adjacent parcel of land west of the pro- posed restaurant site for use as a parking lot, according to Ruther- ford. Under the revised site plan, Robinson will provide up to 30 parking spaces. The number of parking spaces would be reduced to make room for trees and shrubs if the commissioners approve Robinson's beautification plan. Robinson, who owns the Front Porch restaurant in Wilmington, hopes to open the new restaurant next spring. The commissioners will also hold a hearing on a request by Micbele Marshall, of Bonita Faji- ta, for an outside service area. The restaurant is located along High- way One between McKinley and Dagsworthy Streets. Other agenda items include: consideration of proposed density and setback regulations; review of a request by the Rehoboth Beach- Dewey Beach Chamber of Com- merce regarding banners and free- standing signs; an update by the town's trash committee; and re- view of problems associated with CAPE CO.ZETrE, Friday, minors who flock to Dewey Beach at the end of the school year. According to Rutherford, town officials may consider im- plementing a temporary curfew during the first few weeks in June to curtail underage drinking. In other business, the commis- sioners will discuss temporary toi- let facilities at The Waterfront Restaurant. In June of 1991, the commissioners granted the restau- rant owners permission to place four port-a-johns outside of the establishment. "There was only supposed to be a 30-day test period for the utiliza- tion of those port-a-johns," Rutherford said. The mayor and commissioners will meet at 7 p.m. in the Life Sav- ing Station at One Dagsworthy Street. Dewey Beach candidates' forum set for tonight The public is invited to attend the annual candidates' forum sponsored by the Dewey Beach Civic League tonight (Aug. 5). The forum provides an Opportuni- ty for candidates to present their views and to answer questions from the audience. The civic league will endorse candidates based on their respons- es given at the forum, their written statements, their presentations of intentions if elected, and their vot- ing record and positions on cur- rent issues if they are commis- sioners running for reelection. Candidates who do not participate in the forum will not be eligible for endorsement by the civic league. As of Thursday, the only per- sons who had filed as candidates were incumbent Commissioners Faith Duncan and Robert Freder- ick. On September 17, Dewey Beach voters will chose who they want to fill the two open seats on council. Rehoboth mulls boogie boards, Boardwalk bikes Rehoboth Beach Patrol Captain Jate Walsh appeared before the Board of Commissioners Mon- day, Aug. 5 seeking to revise the ordinance governing boogie boards, surfboards and rafts to eonfh-m with present enforcement practices. Presently, the law bans boogie hoards as well as surfboards from bathing areas while lifeguards are on duty. But the guards now allow boogie hoards at times when in- flatable rafts are allowed from Monday through Friday, since, Walsh said, they aren't heavy and apt to cause injury as would a surfboard. The request came about last month, when the police began en- forcing the boogie board ban, even though they are rented out by the concessionaires. Walsh was asked Aug. 5 to meet with solici- tor Walt Speakman and come up with a definition for boogie hoards so that the ordinance can be redrafted. Waish went on to inform the hoard that bicycle traffic is "be- coming thicker all the time," and August 5 - August. II, 1994 - 3 .... " " T ""   : ' : GOP bash set The Sussex County Repub- lican Committee will host the seventh annual Passport Par- ty on Saturday, Aug. 20, from 6-8 p.m. at the Rehoboth Beach Country Club. The af- fair is an annual fund-raiser for the Sussex County GOP. County chairman Roland Derrickson, left, and Pass- port Party co-chairperson Pat Renault hope many sum- mer visitors who may be property owners in Sussex will pay the annual fee of $100 per couple to join in with the many residents of Sussex for an evening of fun and friendship. J. Everett Moore of Georgetown serves as the other Passport Party chairperson- For more information and to purchase tickets, call Mike Hession at 856-6323. that while he believes the law should remain is for this summer, he would like to see bicycles banned from the boardwalk begin- ning at 9 a.m. rather than 10 a.m., as is. presently the case. Walsh said he has seen an increase in bike-related injuries before 10 a.m. and more complaints from pedestrians. PRIDE '94 gives final Sponsor's Ball results PRIDE '94, the organizers of the Sponsors' Ball, held at the Renegade Restaurant July 24 to benefit the Sussex County AIDS Committee and JIM Fund, has re- leased final breakdown of funds raised. Individual sponsors brought in $14,450; corporate benefactors ($500 each), $4,500; corporate benefactors ($250 each), $750; individuals at the door, $1,775; bartender tips, $790; other donations, $600; silent auc- tion, $3.602; live auction, $3,312; income outstanding, $324; special donation from Renegade, $1,107. Rehoboth names new building inspector Susan Frederick, an architect living in Dewey Beach, has been appointed as the new building in- spector for Rehohoth Beach, fol- lowing the resignation of John Dean last month. Frederick had been hired as the assistant building inspector earlier this year. The City of Rehohoth Beach is now searching for a replacement for the assistant building inspec- tor's slot.