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October 8, 2004     Cape Gazette
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CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, Oct. 8 - Oct. 11, 2004 - 33 BtrSlNESS & REAL ESTATE Community Reinvestment Council honors Truxon P By Jim Cresson Ellendale Civic Improvement Association founder and president Harold Truxon was honored in Wilmington, Oct. 5, for excel- lence in community service by the Delaware Community Reinvest- ment Action Council (DCRAC). Truxon, 73, received DCRAC's Excellence in Com- munity Service Award during the organization's eighth annual Cele- brate CRA lunch- eon, held this year at the Delaware Historical Society's Delaware History Museum at Fifth and North Market streets. The council recognized Truxon as "a true community leader who lives daily by the motto: 'If I can help somebody, then my living will not be in vain.'" A retired restaurant owner, Truxon spearheaded a 19-year ef- fort to bring central sewer and wa- ter to the rural Sussex County community of Ellendale. Along the waY, he attended 43 local, coud W, ste and federal meetings to plan ad pursue funding for a central sewer system in the town. Once, he even testified before a congressional hearing about the need for sewer in Ellendale and the pressing need for funding to build the sewer. That system is complete, and Ellendale residents have until Oct. 30 to hook to it. For those who cannot afford to pay the one-time sewer hookup costs, Truxon has sought assis- tance money from several official sources such as Sussex County Council and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Rural Development As- sistance grant pro- gram. "Mr. Truxon is patient and deter- mined about envi- ronmental justice," stated the DCRAC board of directors in an official awards bulletin. "To him, the concept of justice is larger than a person or a town. When an issue tugs at his heart, expect him to be in the thick of it." DCRAC's James H. Sills Jr. CRA Leadership Award recipient for 2004, was JP Morgan Chase Vice President Helen McArdle Stewart, who serves as communi- ty development manager and Community Reinvestment Act of- ricer for Chase USA. DCRAC's Board of Directors Award went to longtime board member Joe Myer, who works as executive director of NCALL Re- search Inc. and oversees NCALL's management team and technical assistance and direct services. Approximately 200 people at- tended the annual event. Many were representatives of the largest banks in the state - Citigroup, Discover Bank, GMAC Bank, JP Morgan Chase, PNC Bank, Arti- san's Bank, Citizens Bank, Com- merce Bank, WSFS Bank, Fannie Mac, Delaware National Bank and Lehman Brothers Bank, F.S.B. Over the past 10 years, those banks have put considerable amounts of money into the Delaware Community Reinvest- ment Action Council for its use in helping low- and moderate-in- come clients to purchase their first new home or start their first small JimCresson photo Harold Truxon of Ellendale received the Delaware Commu- nity Reinvestment Action Council's 2004 award for excel- lence in community service. For 19 years, Truxon worked diligently to bring central sewer to the rural Sussex County town. business. Those same banks also become the lenders for under- served Delawareans who may never find loans without DCRAC's assistance. DCRAC ensures that those clients have completed an extensive Money Matters course for handling per- sonal finances and are well pre- pared to embark on a new and re- sponsible life of home or business ownership. Members of the Delaware Banking Commission and Delaware State Human Relations Commission were also present for the annual celebration, as were members of the First State Com- munity Loan Fund, a nonprofit community development financial institution that creates financing for small businesses. Several housing groups attend- ed, including representatives of the federal Housing and Urban Development Agency, NCALL Research Inc., which offers peo- ple financial help through its rural predevelopment loan fund, the Delaware Housing Coalition, First State Community Action Agency, Housing Opportunities of North- ern Delaware Inc. and Interfaith Housing. DCRAC serves consumers of financial services by providing Continued on page 39 Mix up marketing for best results Even if you'v never baked a cake, you probably know that there's more than one recipe for baking a cake, and each recipe has multiple ingredients. First, you must work your way through the thousands of possible recipes and select the recipe that you want to use. There are probably several factors involved in which recipe you choose, such as who will be eating the cake, what flavors they prefer and how many people the cake needs to serve. Once you've decided on a recipe, you combine carefully measured ingredients to create the final product. Developing a marketing mix works the same way. You need to access the appropriate mediums available to convey your market- ing message then select a good blend of the right ingredients to serve up the right marketing mix. For example, if you're only adver- tising in your local newspaper, there's a good chance that you won't connect with part of your audience. If you combine that print advertising with a direct mail program, you increase your chances of reaching more people within your target audience. Newspapers, magazines, events, direct mail, television, FINANCE Lana O'Hollaren sales promotions, radio, transit, billboards, the Internet - there is an almost endless list of available mediums, each with its own list of advantages and disadvantages. Newspapers, for instance, offer virtually unlimited copy space for ads. Of course, you have to pay more when you use more space, but pages can also become clut- tered with ads due to the populari- ty of the medium. One of the pros of radio advertising is that it's mo- bile. Customers can listen to it in the car, on the beach or at home. The down side is that there's no hard copy for your ad. Once it airs, it's done. The most important factor for selecting the medium, however, is to get in front of your customers and potential customers. Who do you want to reach, and where are they? Certain media will have a stronger appeal to some groups more than others. By narrowing your audience, you can make wise and cost-efficient media choices. Advertising giants like Coca-Cola and McDonald's go through a very similar process to target their advertising so they don't waste money. Lefs say you want to sell residential roofing services. It would make sense for you to ad- vertise or promote your business to local homeowners who live in older homes, rather than to renters. You might advertise in a special home improvement sec- tion of your local newspaper or sponsor a nearby home show to reach your audience. And that brings us to the topic of reach and frequency. What is reach and frequency? Reach is simply the number of people that are exposed to your message. Frequency is the number of times you touch each'of those people with your message. In a perfect world with unlimited resources, you would obviously maximiz both reach and frequency. Unfor- tunately most of us don't operate in that perfect world, so with lim- ited resources we are often faced with the decision of whether to sacrifice reach for frequency or vice versa. If our residential roof- ing services business decides to do a direct mail piece its dilemma will be whether to mail to the en- tire Sussex County area once or to mail to, a more targeted quarter of the county four times. Is it more effective to touch 100 potential customers once or 25 po- tential customers four times? In Seth Godin's book "Permis- sion Marketing," he uses an anal- ogy of seeds and water to demon- strate the importance of adequate frequency in your promotional campaigns. If you were given 100 seeds with enough water to water each seed once, would you plant all 100 seeds and water each one once, or would you be more suc- cessful if you planted 25 seeds and used all of the water on those 25 seeds? Some small business owners are sometimes tempted to think it's shrewd to keep the audience deft- nition broad. Their motto is, "I'11 sell to anyone who has the money; that's my audience." Maybe that's true in that perfect world but even advertising giants like Coca-Cola and McDonald's live in that per- fect world, so 'they target their ad- vertising so they don't waste mon- ey. Although most business people understand the importance of fre- quency, somehow when it comes to the actual implementation of the campaign, frequency is often sacrificed for reach, which almost always results in complaints about the ineffectiveness of our promo- tional efforts. The next time you have to de- cide between mailing one direct mail piece to 10,000 people or mailing to 2,500 people four times, remember those 100 seeds you can water only once. Unless you can substantially increase your resources to get more water, your best and most effective bet is to go for less reach and more fre- quency. Editor's note: Lana O'Hollaren does business development and account management for Aloysius Butler & Clark and manages the agency's southern Delaware of- rice. She can be reached at 227- 5995. CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, Oct. 8 - Oct. 11, 2004 - 33 BtrSlNESS & REAL ESTATE Community Reinvestment Council honors Truxon P By Jim Cresson Ellendale Civic Improvement Association founder and president Harold Truxon was honored in Wilmington, Oct. 5, for excel- lence in community service by the Delaware Community Reinvest- ment Action Council (DCRAC). Truxon, 73, received DCRAC's Excellence in Com- munity Service Award during the organization's eighth annual Cele- brate CRA lunch- eon, held this year at the Delaware Historical Society's Delaware History Museum at Fifth and North Market streets. The council recognized Truxon as "a true community leader who lives daily by the motto: 'If I can help somebody, then my living will not be in vain.'" A retired restaurant owner, Truxon spearheaded a 19-year ef- fort to bring central sewer and wa- ter to the rural Sussex County community of Ellendale. Along the waY, he attended 43 local, coud W, ste and federal meetings to plan ad pursue funding for a central sewer system in the town. Once, he even testified before a congressional hearing about the need for sewer in Ellendale and the pressing need for funding to build the sewer. That system is complete, and Ellendale residents have until Oct. 30 to hook to it. For those who cannot afford to pay the one-time sewer hookup costs, Truxon has sought assis- tance money from several official sources such as Sussex County Council and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Rural Development As- sistance grant pro- gram. "Mr. Truxon is patient and deter- mined about envi- ronmental justice," stated the DCRAC board of directors in an official awards bulletin. "To him, the concept of justice is larger than a person or a town. When an issue tugs at his heart, expect him to be in the thick of it." DCRAC's James H. Sills Jr. CRA Leadership Award recipient for 2004, was JP Morgan Chase Vice President Helen McArdle Stewart, who serves as communi- ty development manager and Community Reinvestment Act of- ricer for Chase USA. DCRAC's Board of Directors Award went to longtime board member Joe Myer, who works as executive director of NCALL Re- search Inc. and oversees NCALL's management team and technical assistance and direct services. Approximately 200 people at- tended the annual event. Many were representatives of the largest banks in the state - Citigroup, Discover Bank, GMAC Bank, JP Morgan Chase, PNC Bank, Arti- san's Bank, Citizens Bank, Com- merce Bank, WSFS Bank, Fannie Mac, Delaware National Bank and Lehman Brothers Bank, F.S.B. Over the past 10 years, those banks have put considerable amounts of money into the Delaware Community Reinvest- ment Action Council for its use in helping low- and moderate-in- come clients to purchase their first new home or start their first small JimCresson photo Harold Truxon of Ellendale received the Delaware Commu- nity Reinvestment Action Council's 2004 award for excel- lence in community service. For 19 years, Truxon worked diligently to bring central sewer to the rural Sussex County town. business. Those same banks also become the lenders for under- served Delawareans who may never find loans without DCRAC's assistance. DCRAC ensures that those clients have completed an extensive Money Matters course for handling per- sonal finances and are well pre- pared to embark on a new and re- sponsible life of home or business ownership. Members of the Delaware Banking Commission and Delaware State Human Relations Commission were also present for the annual celebration, as were members of the First State Com- munity Loan Fund, a nonprofit community development financial institution that creates financing for small businesses. Several housing groups attend- ed, including representatives of the federal Housing and Urban Development Agency, NCALL Research Inc., which offers peo- ple financial help through its rural predevelopment loan fund, the Delaware Housing Coalition, First State Community Action Agency, Housing Opportunities of North- ern Delaware Inc. and Interfaith Housing. DCRAC serves consumers of financial services by providing Continued on page 39 Mix up marketing for best results Even if you'v never baked a cake, you probably know that there's more than one recipe for baking a cake, and each recipe has multiple ingredients. First, you must work your way through the thousands of possible recipes and select the recipe that you want to use. There are probably several factors involved in which recipe you choose, such as who will be eating the cake, what flavors they prefer and how many people the cake needs to serve. Once you've decided on a recipe, you combine carefully measured ingredients to create the final product. Developing a marketing mix works the same way. You need to access the appropriate mediums available to convey your market- ing message then select a good blend of the right ingredients to serve up the right marketing mix. For example, if you're only adver- tising in your local newspaper, there's a good chance that you won't connect with part of your audience. If you combine that print advertising with a direct mail program, you increase your chances of reaching more people within your target audience. Newspapers, magazines, events, direct mail, television, FINANCE Lana O'Hollaren sales promotions, radio, transit, billboards, the Internet - there is an almost endless list of available mediums, each with its own list of advantages and disadvantages. Newspapers, for instance, offer virtually unlimited copy space for ads. Of course, you have to pay more when you use more space, but pages can also become clut- tered with ads due to the populari- ty of the medium. One of the pros of radio advertising is that it's mo- bile. Customers can listen to it in the car, on the beach or at home. The down side is that there's no hard copy for your ad. Once it airs, it's done. The most important factor for selecting the medium, however, is to get in front of your customers and potential customers. Who do you want to reach, and where are they? Certain media will have a stronger appeal to some groups more than others. By narrowing your audience, you can make wise and cost-efficient media choices. Advertising giants like Coca-Cola and McDonald's go through a very similar process to target their advertising so they don't waste money. Lefs say you want to sell residential roofing services. It would make sense for you to ad- vertise or promote your business to local homeowners who live in older homes, rather than to renters. You might advertise in a special home improvement sec- tion of your local newspaper or sponsor a nearby home show to reach your audience. And that brings us to the topic of reach and frequency. What is reach and frequency? Reach is simply the number of people that are exposed to your message. Frequency is the number of times you touch each'of those people with your message. In a perfect world with unlimited resources, you would obviously maximiz both reach and frequency. Unfor- tunately most of us don't operate in that perfect world, so with lim- ited resources we are often faced with the decision of whether to sacrifice reach for frequency or vice versa. If our residential roof- ing services business decides to do a direct mail piece its dilemma will be whether to mail to the en- tire Sussex County area once or to mail to, a more targeted quarter of the county four times. Is it more effective to touch 100 potential customers once or 25 po- tential customers four times? In Seth Godin's book "Permis- sion Marketing," he uses an anal- ogy of seeds and water to demon- strate the importance of adequate frequency in your promotional campaigns. If you were given 100 seeds with enough water to water each seed once, would you plant all 100 seeds and water each one once, or would you be more suc- cessful if you planted 25 seeds and used all of the water on those 25 seeds? Some small business owners are sometimes tempted to think it's shrewd to keep the audience deft- nition broad. Their motto is, "I'11 sell to anyone who has the money; that's my audience." Maybe that's true in that perfect world but even advertising giants like Coca-Cola and McDonald's live in that per- fect world, so 'they target their ad- vertising so they don't waste mon- ey. Although most business people understand the importance of fre- quency, somehow when it comes to the actual implementation of the campaign, frequency is often sacrificed for reach, which almost always results in complaints about the ineffectiveness of our promo- tional efforts. The next time you have to de- cide between mailing one direct mail piece to 10,000 people or mailing to 2,500 people four times, remember those 100 seeds you can water only once. Unless you can substantially increase your resources to get more water, your best and most effective bet is to go for less reach and more fre- quency. Editor's note: Lana O'Hollaren does business development and account management for Aloysius Butler & Clark and manages the agency's southern Delaware of- rice. She can be reached at 227- 5995.