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October 10, 2006     Cape Gazette
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October 10, 2006
 

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+ Residents build in tax ditch right of way State wants obstructions removed for maintenance By Ron MacArthur Cape Gazette staff Homeowners have been allowed to build in the tax ditch right of way in Overbrook Shores near Lewes, and for years, no. one paid attention. Now, those obstructions must be removed, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control TV station shes " pu on-mr target date to end of year By Henry J. Evans Jr. Cape Gazette staff Delaware 59-TV, WRDE, a low-powered television station its developers say would be the fwst of its kind in the state, could be on the air by late this year. Meyer Gottesman, station president, on Monday, Oct. 9, said money shortages have pushed back the start date and kept the sta- tion from purchasing its most critical piece of equipment - a $14,500 transmitter. "Progress has not been good, but we're plodding along and we still plan to get on air," said Gottesman. This summer, Sam Jordan, station sales manager and program director, said they planned to have the station broadcasting regular programming in September. Gottesman said the station's a'mm has been purchased and the antenna tower has been leased at Nassau Valley .neyards. The station has also leased office and stu- dio space at Nassau Commons, near the Continued on page 11 (DNREC) officials say. The Carsyljan Acres tax ditch obstruction meeting Wednesday, Oct, 4, at the Milton Fire Hail provided the lightning rod for an issue that has been ready to explode for months. Some residents - as many as 25 or more in a section of Overbrook Shores on Jays Way and West Mill Run - have built every- thing from sheds to decks to portions of houses on the 25-foot right of way along the ditch. Now DNREC officials say it's time to clean out the ditch; no obstructions are permitted in the right of way. Three developments, west of Route 1 between Lewes and Milton, are part of the tax ditch formed in 1984: Carsyljan Acres, Overbrook Shores and Vincent Overlook. Brooks Cahall, DNREC environmental program manager, tried to set the stage for the meeting. "This is not a tax ditch meet- ing but a meeting to figure out how to get the right of way back in shape and get the tax ditch maintenance back," he said. To complicate the matter, a new tract of land has recently been added to the tax ditch watershed. A new development to the west, Vincent Overlook, requested to be added to the district and was voted in, said Michele Garner, an administrative special- ist with the Division of Soil and Water Conservation Drainage Program. Many who attended the meeting ques- tioned the vote and the process of inform- ing members about the vote, and at least Continued on page 12  tte Sussex artist wins Federal Duck Stamp Art .Contest artist Richard Cl/fion recently won the oee to tud wetland acquis/tions for the Nat/onal Wildlife Federal Duck StampArt Conles(, 8po by the U. igofn. : Fish and Wildlife Service. Clifton's design dOlldet s pair The contest, o-hosted by Ducks Unlimited, the Greater of ring-neCked ducks and was chosen as the federal duck Memphis (Tenn.)Arts COuncil and the Memphis Colle . stamp, which will be sold in June 2007. of Art, received 297 entries from 49 states.. Each year, federal duck stamps raise about  minion For a mor)5  topage g " Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control officials to enhance the latest proposals on buffers. The state's pollution control strategies, which have been in development for more than eight years, are designed to reduce the amount of nitrogen and phosphorus that enters the Inland Bays estuary. The center's board of directors bad praise for revised proposals, issued in August, on stormwater management, wastewater sys L tems and point sources of pollution. But when it comes to buffers along Inland Bay wetlands, the board found that the 100-foot buffers called for last year filter nearly 100 times as much of some pollutants as 50-foot buffers. Buffers are undisturbed tracts of land bordering marshlands, wetlands and water- ways. They filter runoff and absorb nutri- ents before the nutrients can reach the Inland Bays. The new study, and a related white paper developed by.the center and its science and technicai advisory committee, shows the most recent proposal, released in August, would leave buffers currently required under Sussex County regulations largely unchanged. Continued on page 13 By Laura Ritter Cape Gazette staff A new study by the Center for the Inland Bays shows the most recent revision of state pollution control strategies will offer significantly less runoff protection to the Inland Bays watershed than an earlier pro- posal calling for 100-foot buffers to protect the region's wetlands and waterways. As a result, the center is asking the Center for Inland Bays wanm wider buffers + Residents build in tax ditch right of way State wants obstructions removed for maintenance By Ron MacArthur Cape Gazette staff Homeowners have been allowed to build in the tax ditch right of way in Overbrook Shores near Lewes, and for years, no. one paid attention. Now, those obstructions must be removed, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control TV station shes " pu on-mr target date to end of year By Henry J. Evans Jr. Cape Gazette staff Delaware 59-TV, WRDE, a low-powered television station its developers say would be the fwst of its kind in the state, could be on the air by late this year. Meyer Gottesman, station president, on Monday, Oct. 9, said money shortages have pushed back the start date and kept the sta- tion from purchasing its most critical piece of equipment - a $14,500 transmitter. "Progress has not been good, but we're plodding along and we still plan to get on air," said Gottesman. This summer, Sam Jordan, station sales manager and program director, said they planned to have the station broadcasting regular programming in September. Gottesman said the station's a'mm has been purchased and the antenna tower has been leased at Nassau Valley .neyards. The station has also leased office and stu- dio space at Nassau Commons, near the Continued on page 11 (DNREC) officials say. The Carsyljan Acres tax ditch obstruction meeting Wednesday, Oct, 4, at the Milton Fire Hail provided the lightning rod for an issue that has been ready to explode for months. Some residents - as many as 25 or more in a section of Overbrook Shores on Jays Way and West Mill Run - have built every- thing from sheds to decks to portions of houses on the 25-foot right of way along the ditch. Now DNREC officials say it's time to clean out the ditch; no obstructions are permitted in the right of way. Three developments, west of Route 1 between Lewes and Milton, are part of the tax ditch formed in 1984: Carsyljan Acres, Overbrook Shores and Vincent Overlook. Brooks Cahall, DNREC environmental program manager, tried to set the stage for the meeting. "This is not a tax ditch meet- ing but a meeting to figure out how to get the right of way back in shape and get the tax ditch maintenance back," he said. To complicate the matter, a new tract of land has recently been added to the tax ditch watershed. A new development to the west, Vincent Overlook, requested to be added to the district and was voted in, said Michele Garner, an administrative special- ist with the Division of Soil and Water Conservation Drainage Program. Many who attended the meeting ques- tioned the vote and the process of inform- ing members about the vote, and at least Continued on page 12  tte Sussex artist wins Federal Duck Stamp Art .Contest artist Richard Cl/fion recently won the oee to tud wetland acquis/tions for the Nat/onal Wildlife Federal Duck StampArt Conles(, 8po by the U. igofn. : Fish and Wildlife Service. Clifton's design dOlldet s pair The contest, o-hosted by Ducks Unlimited, the Greater of ring-neCked ducks and was chosen as the federal duck Memphis (Tenn.)Arts COuncil and the Memphis Colle . stamp, which will be sold in June 2007. of Art, received 297 entries from 49 states.. Each year, federal duck stamps raise about  minion For a mor)5  topage g " Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control officials to enhance the latest proposals on buffers. The state's pollution control strategies, which have been in development for more than eight years, are designed to reduce the amount of nitrogen and phosphorus that enters the Inland Bays estuary. The center's board of directors bad praise for revised proposals, issued in August, on stormwater management, wastewater sys L tems and point sources of pollution. But when it comes to buffers along Inland Bay wetlands, the board found that the 100-foot buffers called for last year filter nearly 100 times as much of some pollutants as 50-foot buffers. Buffers are undisturbed tracts of land bordering marshlands, wetlands and water- ways. They filter runoff and absorb nutri- ents before the nutrients can reach the Inland Bays. The new study, and a related white paper developed by.the center and its science and technicai advisory committee, shows the most recent proposal, released in August, would leave buffers currently required under Sussex County regulations largely unchanged. Continued on page 13 By Laura Ritter Cape Gazette staff A new study by the Center for the Inland Bays shows the most recent revision of state pollution control strategies will offer significantly less runoff protection to the Inland Bays watershed than an earlier pro- posal calling for 100-foot buffers to protect the region's wetlands and waterways. As a result, the center is asking the Center for Inland Bays wanm wider buffers