Newspaper Archive of
Cape Gazette
Lewes, Delaware
Jim's Towing Service
October 10, 2006     Cape Gazette
PAGE 4     (4 of 50 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 4     (4 of 50 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
October 10, 2006
 

Newspaper Archive of Cape Gazette produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2018. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




4 - CAPE GAZETTE - Tuesday, October 10 - Thursday, October 12, 2006 Sussex County rescue team hones skills Technicians extricate victims from collapsed building By Georgia Leonhart Cape Gazette staff Men in protective gear shored up an entranceway with pneumat- ic and wooden supports as they entered a building Sunday, Oct. 8, working hard as they moved fur- ther within to ensure the building would not collapse and entrap them and any victims they tried to save. This time it was a simulated emergency at the fire school of the State Fire Marshal's Office. The exercise was designed to hone the skills of Sussex County's Technical Rescue Team, which searches out and rescues people in emergencies such as a building or trench collapse. The team was under the direction of Capt. Chuck Snyder from Rehoboth Beach Volunteer Fire Company and instructor George Drees. In addition to being a search and rescue specialist and certified instructor for Paratech, the manu- facturer of the pneumatic shoring system, Drees is a full-time fire- fighter who has served in the fed- eral urban search and rescue task force in the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attack in New York, and in the emergencies cre- ated by hurricanes Floyd, Katrina, Rita and Isabel. The Sussex team is a multi- jurisdictional collaboration of fire- fighters, paramedics and others from throughout the county. One of its greatest assets is its primary truck, which cost approximately $500,000, including equipment. "The process in search and res- cue is to first determine if there is any air that would allow a person to breathe and be alive," Drees said. "The truck has the equipment needed to test for livable air and a search camera to help locate sur- Georgia Leonhart photos Sussex County Technical Rescue Team members pause on rakers supported by a pneumatic shoring system. Team members installed the rakers to prevent outward collapse of building walls during a simulated training exercise near Georgetown. vivors," he said. The primary truck can carry up to eight men, its own generator, significant light sources and sever- al pneumatic shoring systems. Its state-of-the-art equipment enables team members tO determine load shifting in a building, trench, vehi- cle or other structure. It has air supplies for men ranging from small five-minute cylinders to cords and external tanks that can provide five hours of breathing time. Other resources include heaters, blowers and ventilation tubes to prevent hypothermia; trench pan- els; wood; circular and chain saws; and a diamond bit saw capable of cutting through concrete and steel. It has pneumatic equipment and fixtures that can lift weights from 1 to 72 tons. Uniformity of training and equipment throughout the United States is a key feature, requiring that all urban search and rescue teams are trained to identical national standards said Drees. The money to obtain the pri- mary .truck and equipment was obtained through a competitive grant request through the Delaware Emergency Management Agency to the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Recipients of the grants were determined based on threat level Ron MscArthur photos High winds blast Cape Region Elizabeth Tinley of Philadelphia and Chloe brave the ele- ments Saturday, Oct. 7, to take a walk on the wild side on a narrow strip of beach as the high surf in Rehoboth Beach breaks behind them. Wind, big waves and rain blanketed the area Friday and Saturday, causing some beach erosion.  The weather did not deter greyhounds and their owners from taking part in the annual Greyhounds Reach the Beach weekend. and local need. With the threat of hurricanes and fires, Sussex County met all criteria. Funding for maintenance and training is ongoing. Snyder said he was working to bring the needed equipment and training to Sussex County before Sept. 11, 2001. "There was a bad trench incident when an excavator fell into a trench in Berlin, Maryland, and we had nothing in Sussex County that could help. That had to wait for hours to get help from Baltimore and Anne Arundel County," Snyder said. Snyder said he realized Sussex County needed help and formed a countywide committee to address that need. "The truck has been available and operational since August 2005, and since then we've responded to four emer- gency situations including a build- ing in Selbyville, a house on Route 9 in Lewes, and a fourth-to-third- floor collapse in Roxana," Snyder said. Team member Glenn Marshall of Lewes said that more team members of all types are needed. "We have f'irefighters, paramedics and people with construction expertise," Marshall said. With the primary truck at the Lewes-Rehoboth Fire station on Route 24 and support trailers capa- ble of dealing with many emer- gency rescue operations, without the primary truck, in Bethany Beach and Laurel, Marshall said that the response time for the team is one-half to one hour, a fact he attributes to accountability and manpower. Jamie Turner, director of Delaware Emergency Manage-" ment Agency and chairman of the state's Homeland Security Terrorism Preparedness working group, was instrumental in getting all three Delaware counties needed trucks, equipment and training. "They have the money, the plan- ning, the training, the equipment and the exercise. This is excel- lent," Turner said as he watched the Sussex County team at work. The rescue team's primary truck, with equipment including a generator and emergency lighting, is housed at the Lewes- Rehoboth Fire station on Route 24. Support trailers capable of dealing with many emergency rescue operations without requiring the primary truck are located in Bethany Beach and in Laurel. Tim McClanahan of Lewes, center, looks through an area created by shoring tech- niques to create space between collapsed floors. Dwayne Chaffinch of Laurel, right, listens as George Drees, an instructor for the manufacturer of the pneu- matic shoring systems and member of the federal Urban Search and Rescue Program, explains about the place- ment of vertical floor sup- ports used in dealing with collapsed floor scenarios. Dewey man arrested for soliciting children; awaits extradition A Dewey Beach man is await- ing extradition from Maryland to face charges related to internet solicitation of children. The Delaware investigation was prompted by New Mexico investigators who linked Jeffrey M. Campbell, 28, to internet solicitation of children. Sgt. Melissa Zebley, state police spokeswoman, said the Delaware State Police High Tech Crimes Unit (HTCU) received information, Sept. 18, that Campbell had allegedly been communicating with an under- cover officer of the Albuquerque (N.M.) Attorney General's Office Internet Crimes against Children Task Force. The officer had been posing as a 12-year-old girl. Zebley said the communica- tions, which occurred in April and May, had lapsed tem- porarily but were reestablished in September, at which point Delaware State Police were notified. The Delaware investi- gators were advised that Campbell was soliciting sex from underage girls. CAMPBELL HTCU detectives and an undercover trooper established telephone contact with Campbell Oct. 1, to further investigate the requests Campbell had made of the undercover New Mexico offi- cer. During a telephone conversa- tion with an undercover trooper, Campbell again solicited for sex and stated to her that she could come and live with him. Zebley said police obtained a search warrant for Campbell's residence - located in the first block of Ocean Winds, Dewey Beach - as well as arrest war- ants for seven counts of :sexual solicitation of a hild. Police executed the search warrant Friday, Oct. 6, at which time troopers discovered Campbell was at a rela- tive's residence in Elkton, Md. With the assistance of the Elkton Police Department, Campbell was arrested in Elkton as a fugitive from Delaware and is awaiting extradition. Among the items seized from Campbell's home were two com- puters, a digital camera and six CD ROMs. AdditiOnal charges are expect- ed after the forensic examination of Campbell's computer. !-::  4 - CAPE GAZETTE - Tuesday, October 10 - Thursday, October 12, 2006 Sussex County rescue team hones skills Technicians extricate victims from collapsed building By Georgia Leonhart Cape Gazette staff Men in protective gear shored up an entranceway with pneumat- ic and wooden supports as they entered a building Sunday, Oct. 8, working hard as they moved fur- ther within to ensure the building would not collapse and entrap them and any victims they tried to save. This time it was a simulated emergency at the fire school of the State Fire Marshal's Office. The exercise was designed to hone the skills of Sussex County's Technical Rescue Team, which searches out and rescues people in emergencies such as a building or trench collapse. The team was under the direction of Capt. Chuck Snyder from Rehoboth Beach Volunteer Fire Company and instructor George Drees. In addition to being a search and rescue specialist and certified instructor for Paratech, the manu- facturer of the pneumatic shoring system, Drees is a full-time fire- fighter who has served in the fed- eral urban search and rescue task force in the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attack in New York, and in the emergencies cre- ated by hurricanes Floyd, Katrina, Rita and Isabel. The Sussex team is a multi- jurisdictional collaboration of fire- fighters, paramedics and others from throughout the county. One of its greatest assets is its primary truck, which cost approximately $500,000, including equipment. "The process in search and res- cue is to first determine if there is any air that would allow a person to breathe and be alive," Drees said. "The truck has the equipment needed to test for livable air and a search camera to help locate sur- Georgia Leonhart photos Sussex County Technical Rescue Team members pause on rakers supported by a pneumatic shoring system. Team members installed the rakers to prevent outward collapse of building walls during a simulated training exercise near Georgetown. vivors," he said. The primary truck can carry up to eight men, its own generator, significant light sources and sever- al pneumatic shoring systems. Its state-of-the-art equipment enables team members tO determine load shifting in a building, trench, vehi- cle or other structure. It has air supplies for men ranging from small five-minute cylinders to cords and external tanks that can provide five hours of breathing time. Other resources include heaters, blowers and ventilation tubes to prevent hypothermia; trench pan- els; wood; circular and chain saws; and a diamond bit saw capable of cutting through concrete and steel. It has pneumatic equipment and fixtures that can lift weights from 1 to 72 tons. Uniformity of training and equipment throughout the United States is a key feature, requiring that all urban search and rescue teams are trained to identical national standards said Drees. The money to obtain the pri- mary .truck and equipment was obtained through a competitive grant request through the Delaware Emergency Management Agency to the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Recipients of the grants were determined based on threat level Ron MscArthur photos High winds blast Cape Region Elizabeth Tinley of Philadelphia and Chloe brave the ele- ments Saturday, Oct. 7, to take a walk on the wild side on a narrow strip of beach as the high surf in Rehoboth Beach breaks behind them. Wind, big waves and rain blanketed the area Friday and Saturday, causing some beach erosion.  The weather did not deter greyhounds and their owners from taking part in the annual Greyhounds Reach the Beach weekend. and local need. With the threat of hurricanes and fires, Sussex County met all criteria. Funding for maintenance and training is ongoing. Snyder said he was working to bring the needed equipment and training to Sussex County before Sept. 11, 2001. "There was a bad trench incident when an excavator fell into a trench in Berlin, Maryland, and we had nothing in Sussex County that could help. That had to wait for hours to get help from Baltimore and Anne Arundel County," Snyder said. Snyder said he realized Sussex County needed help and formed a countywide committee to address that need. "The truck has been available and operational since August 2005, and since then we've responded to four emer- gency situations including a build- ing in Selbyville, a house on Route 9 in Lewes, and a fourth-to-third- floor collapse in Roxana," Snyder said. Team member Glenn Marshall of Lewes said that more team members of all types are needed. "We have f'irefighters, paramedics and people with construction expertise," Marshall said. With the primary truck at the Lewes-Rehoboth Fire station on Route 24 and support trailers capa- ble of dealing with many emer- gency rescue operations, without the primary truck, in Bethany Beach and Laurel, Marshall said that the response time for the team is one-half to one hour, a fact he attributes to accountability and manpower. Jamie Turner, director of Delaware Emergency Manage-" ment Agency and chairman of the state's Homeland Security Terrorism Preparedness working group, was instrumental in getting all three Delaware counties needed trucks, equipment and training. "They have the money, the plan- ning, the training, the equipment and the exercise. This is excel- lent," Turner said as he watched the Sussex County team at work. The rescue team's primary truck, with equipment including a generator and emergency lighting, is housed at the Lewes- Rehoboth Fire station on Route 24. Support trailers capable of dealing with many emergency rescue operations without requiring the primary truck are located in Bethany Beach and in Laurel. Tim McClanahan of Lewes, center, looks through an area created by shoring tech- niques to create space between collapsed floors. Dwayne Chaffinch of Laurel, right, listens as George Drees, an instructor for the manufacturer of the pneu- matic shoring systems and member of the federal Urban Search and Rescue Program, explains about the place- ment of vertical floor sup- ports used in dealing with collapsed floor scenarios. Dewey man arrested for soliciting children; awaits extradition A Dewey Beach man is await- ing extradition from Maryland to face charges related to internet solicitation of children. The Delaware investigation was prompted by New Mexico investigators who linked Jeffrey M. Campbell, 28, to internet solicitation of children. Sgt. Melissa Zebley, state police spokeswoman, said the Delaware State Police High Tech Crimes Unit (HTCU) received information, Sept. 18, that Campbell had allegedly been communicating with an under- cover officer of the Albuquerque (N.M.) Attorney General's Office Internet Crimes against Children Task Force. The officer had been posing as a 12-year-old girl. Zebley said the communica- tions, which occurred in April and May, had lapsed tem- porarily but were reestablished in September, at which point Delaware State Police were notified. The Delaware investi- gators were advised that Campbell was soliciting sex from underage girls. CAMPBELL HTCU detectives and an undercover trooper established telephone contact with Campbell Oct. 1, to further investigate the requests Campbell had made of the undercover New Mexico offi- cer. During a telephone conversa- tion with an undercover trooper, Campbell again solicited for sex and stated to her that she could come and live with him. Zebley said police obtained a search warrant for Campbell's residence - located in the first block of Ocean Winds, Dewey Beach - as well as arrest war- ants for seven counts of :sexual solicitation of a hild. Police executed the search warrant Friday, Oct. 6, at which time troopers discovered Campbell was at a rela- tive's residence in Elkton, Md. With the assistance of the Elkton Police Department, Campbell was arrested in Elkton as a fugitive from Delaware and is awaiting extradition. Among the items seized from Campbell's home were two com- puters, a digital camera and six CD ROMs. AdditiOnal charges are expect- ed after the forensic examination of Campbell's computer. !-::