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14 - CAPE GAZETTE - Tuesday, October 10 - Thursday, October 12, 2006 / .... CAPE LIFE Lewes couple find fulfillment helping rehabilitate prisoners By Denise Cavaliere Special to the Cape Gazette Nancy Williams of Lewes, along with her husband, Jeff, has led a full life. They have three children, enjoy their jobs and are active in the church. But, until recently, they felt there was some- thing missing. Williams said, "We wanted to do something to help others, even if it meant moving out of our comfort zone." A couple of years ago, she heard about the Alternatives to Violence Project (AVP) and was impressed by the idea of helping to rehabilitate prisoners to enable them to deal with situations in a non-violent way. The concept originated with the Quakers in the mid-1970s. After much soul- searching and discussion, in March 2005, the couple decided t o join the program. : T_raining took place over a peri- od of three to four weekends and was conducted by Patty DiCarne, the local coordinator of the AVP. It consisted of participating in basic and advanced workshops and guided them through a curriculum of exercises, discussions and information designed to help the prisoners develop self-esteem and a sense of community. These sessions were held in the Sussex Correctional Institute in Georgetown. Initially, entering the facility was a bit daunting for Williams. "I remember feeling a little uncomfortable walking into the prison," she said. "It felt a bit strange going through the screen- ing and search procedures." Now, it's just part of the normal routine for the couple as they report to the prison to serve as Community Facilitators. The AVP is a voluntary course offered to prisoners. There are about 20 participants in the ses- sions. These workshops, conduct- ed by a community facilitator and three to four inmate facilitators, cover such subjects as forgive- ness, bias awareness, manly awareness and truth. The aim is to give the inmates the tools they need to live a non-violent life. Several of the exercises consist of role-playing and listening to oth- ers. "Sometimes, we all sit in a concentric circle and talk, one on one, on any given topic, such as what single thing you would change in your life," Williams said. "They really learn how to listen to the other person and to communicate." The AVP program is based on four principles: There is some good in all peo- ple. There is a peaceful solution to every incident. You have to be willing to look for that peaceful solution. It's a process that has to be practiced. "It's heartwarming to see the all the good that comes out of these sessions," Williams stated. "I had one inmate tell me he never thought there were other victims related to his crime. Now he sees how it affected families, neigh- bors and friends, and he seems determined to change." Mike DeLoy, deputy warden of the Georgetown facility, applauds the AVP Program. "It's been in operation here since the 1980s and makes a difference," he said. "It's Denise Cmmlhml photo Jeff and Nancy Williams of Lewes feel giving to others through the AVP has enriched their own lives. definitely a positive influence on the inmates and gives them the tools to avoid stressful situations." Currently, one weekend session is held monthly beginning on Friday evening and continuing all day Saturday and Sunday. Each community facilitator presents one or two of these pro- grams in a year. DiCarne stated, "We would like to see more peo- ple volunteer for the AVP Program so that the scheduling can be expanded." She added, "Since the inmates at this facility are male, we would especially welcome a few good men to serve as role models." For more information, contact DiCarne at 537-6926. Saltwater Portrait Aunt Polly works behind the scenes in Milton By Ron MacArthur Cape Gazette staff As the rain drips off her roof, Polly Stuchlik slips inside the porch of her Milton home to get dry. She grabs a cup of coffee to warm up her chilled body, and she peers out her screen door to watch a scene that has been repeated in her front yard for nearly 20 years. Over the next few hours, more than 1,500 bicyclists will pull into her yard off Cave Neck Road, one of six food stops on the MS Bike to the Bay, a fundraiser for the Delaware Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. The annual event took place Sept. 30 and Oct. 1 with riders biking 75 miles from Dover to Rehoboth on Saturday and then back on Sunday. But it's not just any food stop, it's Uncle Ted's, the legendary stop all cyclists look forward to. Uncle Ted is the late Ted Stuchlik, Polly's husband who passed away in 1993 at the age of 73. Even so, the food stop still bears his "name, and Polly has no problem with that. The homestead was always known as Uncle Ted's Farm, so when the name was given to the food stop, it stuck. Uncle Ted's stop not only has an amazing variety of home- baked goods, including every- thing from brownies to lemon Irs,but also provides scrapple ANN POLLY and sausage sandwiches and cof- fee, which is unique on the bike- tour circuit. Polly is not a bike rider and has no real interest in the sport, so how did she get involved with the largest bicycling event in the state ? "A son of my husband's boss asked if they could use our front yard as a place to stop and get fresh water when the event first started," she said. The fLrst few years of the MS Bike to the Bay in the late 1980s there were 100 to 200 riders. "Every year, the ride grew," she said. Riders used the fide as an unofficial pit stop. Before long, the ride organizers approached the Stuchliks asking them to make their large front yard an official food stop with the Odd Fellows and Rebeka h Lodge providing the refreshments and volunteers to man the spot. That was 17 years ago. In recent years, the Milford American Legion and Auxiliary have been providing volunteers as well. Polly, who is, you guessed it, affectionately called Aunt Polly, looks forward to fall each year with the arrival of Bike to the Bay. "I really love it. It amazes me. Riders tell me it's the only ride they gain weight on," she said with a big grin. Polly is quick to deflect any acclaim. In fact, she is adamant about not wanting any credit. "I'm just glad I can offer a place for the bikers. The volunteers here can never get enough thanks for what they do," she said. "Many of them come in on Friday, and they come from all over the state. Some spend the night in hotels and they are out here early in the morning. Many have been coming here since the beginning. "The ladies must bake all sum- mer and freeze baked goods. Every year it keeps getting bet- teL" Pennsylvania transplant Polly moved to Milton in 1949 from her home in central Pennsylvania to begin her life with Ted, who had his own electri- cal business. She has lived in the family home ever since. "It was a big shock to me because I had never seen the ocean and so much flat land." Although she has worked as a secretary, most of her life has been spent as a housewife. "I'm from that time when women stayed home and raised the children. It's a luxury now," she said. She has two daughters, Susan Edwards who lives in Dover, and Carol Workman who lives in Atlanta, one grandchild and two great-grandchildren. A staunch Democrat, Polly loves to keep up on the news. She reads two daily newspapers and most weekly newspapers. "A lot of people think I'm nosey, but I like to read and keep up on what is going on. I'm inter- ested in local politics too," she said. She was impressed when she met Ferris Wharton, a Republican, one of the riders in the MS Bike to the Bay. He stopped by Uncle Ted's. "He has my vote if r nothing else what he did to prose- cute the Capano case," she said. But, she refuses to join the com- puter age. "I don't want one. There is no privacy anymore with Big Brother watching every- thing." She doesn't like a lot of what she sees in the national news, especially the recent rash of school shootings. "It's hard to figure out what is wrong with people. Do they watch too much TV and then copy it?" she asked. Polly is making sure that her husband's legacy continues, and the MS Bike to the Bay cyclists always have a place to stop and rest - and get scrapple sandwich- es. Polly said she has met thou- sands of participants in the bike tour over the years, and every one of them has been polite and thank- ful for Uncle Ted's. And she admires them for help- ing to fight a dreaded disease. "I've written in my will that my daughters still provide this space for them," Polly said. Polly sits down in one of two rocking chairs in her porch. The rain is letting up and she needs a refill on her coffee. A few bicyclists pull in and smile when they get a scrapple sandwich. Polly smiles, too, as they wave. The rain stops and the sun is coming out in the western sky. The last of the cyclists pull out of Uncle Ted's stop, clip into their pedals and bike away. The cycle of Polly's life is com- plete for another year. 14 - CAPE GAZETTE - Tuesday, October 10 - Thursday, October 12, 2006 / .... CAPE LIFE Lewes couple find fulfillment helping rehabilitate prisoners By Denise Cavaliere Special to the Cape Gazette Nancy Williams of Lewes, along with her husband, Jeff, has led a full life. They have three children, enjoy their jobs and are active in the church. But, until recently, they felt there was some- thing missing. Williams said, "We wanted to do something to help others, even if it meant moving out of our comfort zone." A couple of years ago, she heard about the Alternatives to Violence Project (AVP) and was impressed by the idea of helping to rehabilitate prisoners to enable them to deal with situations in a non-violent way. The concept originated with the Quakers in the mid-1970s. After much soul- searching and discussion, in March 2005, the couple decided t o join the program. : T_raining took place over a peri- od of three to four weekends and was conducted by Patty DiCarne, the local coordinator of the AVP. It consisted of participating in basic and advanced workshops and guided them through a curriculum of exercises, discussions and information designed to help the prisoners develop self-esteem and a sense of community. These sessions were held in the Sussex Correctional Institute in Georgetown. Initially, entering the facility was a bit daunting for Williams. "I remember feeling a little uncomfortable walking into the prison," she said. "It felt a bit strange going through the screen- ing and search procedures." Now, it's just part of the normal routine for the couple as they report to the prison to serve as Community Facilitators. The AVP is a voluntary course offered to prisoners. There are about 20 participants in the ses- sions. These workshops, conduct- ed by a community facilitator and three to four inmate facilitators, cover such subjects as forgive- ness, bias awareness, manly awareness and truth. The aim is to give the inmates the tools they need to live a non-violent life. Several of the exercises consist of role-playing and listening to oth- ers. "Sometimes, we all sit in a concentric circle and talk, one on one, on any given topic, such as what single thing you would change in your life," Williams said. "They really learn how to listen to the other person and to communicate." The AVP program is based on four principles: There is some good in all peo- ple. There is a peaceful solution to every incident. You have to be willing to look for that peaceful solution. It's a process that has to be practiced. "It's heartwarming to see the all the good that comes out of these sessions," Williams stated. "I had one inmate tell me he never thought there were other victims related to his crime. Now he sees how it affected families, neigh- bors and friends, and he seems determined to change." Mike DeLoy, deputy warden of the Georgetown facility, applauds the AVP Program. "It's been in operation here since the 1980s and makes a difference," he said. "It's Denise Cmmlhml photo Jeff and Nancy Williams of Lewes feel giving to others through the AVP has enriched their own lives. definitely a positive influence on the inmates and gives them the tools to avoid stressful situations." Currently, one weekend session is held monthly beginning on Friday evening and continuing all day Saturday and Sunday. Each community facilitator presents one or two of these pro- grams in a year. DiCarne stated, "We would like to see more peo- ple volunteer for the AVP Program so that the scheduling can be expanded." She added, "Since the inmates at this facility are male, we would especially welcome a few good men to serve as role models." For more information, contact DiCarne at 537-6926. Saltwater Portrait Aunt Polly works behind the scenes in Milton By Ron MacArthur Cape Gazette staff As the rain drips off her roof, Polly Stuchlik slips inside the porch of her Milton home to get dry. She grabs a cup of coffee to warm up her chilled body, and she peers out her screen door to watch a scene that has been repeated in her front yard for nearly 20 years. Over the next few hours, more than 1,500 bicyclists will pull into her yard off Cave Neck Road, one of six food stops on the MS Bike to the Bay, a fundraiser for the Delaware Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. The annual event took place Sept. 30 and Oct. 1 with riders biking 75 miles from Dover to Rehoboth on Saturday and then back on Sunday. But it's not just any food stop, it's Uncle Ted's, the legendary stop all cyclists look forward to. Uncle Ted is the late Ted Stuchlik, Polly's husband who passed away in 1993 at the age of 73. Even so, the food stop still bears his "name, and Polly has no problem with that. The homestead was always known as Uncle Ted's Farm, so when the name was given to the food stop, it stuck. Uncle Ted's stop not only has an amazing variety of home- baked goods, including every- thing from brownies to lemon Irs,but also provides scrapple ANN POLLY and sausage sandwiches and cof- fee, which is unique on the bike- tour circuit. Polly is not a bike rider and has no real interest in the sport, so how did she get involved with the largest bicycling event in the state ? "A son of my husband's boss asked if they could use our front yard as a place to stop and get fresh water when the event first started," she said. The fLrst few years of the MS Bike to the Bay in the late 1980s there were 100 to 200 riders. "Every year, the ride grew," she said. Riders used the fide as an unofficial pit stop. Before long, the ride organizers approached the Stuchliks asking them to make their large front yard an official food stop with the Odd Fellows and Rebeka h Lodge providing the refreshments and volunteers to man the spot. That was 17 years ago. In recent years, the Milford American Legion and Auxiliary have been providing volunteers as well. Polly, who is, you guessed it, affectionately called Aunt Polly, looks forward to fall each year with the arrival of Bike to the Bay. "I really love it. It amazes me. Riders tell me it's the only ride they gain weight on," she said with a big grin. Polly is quick to deflect any acclaim. In fact, she is adamant about not wanting any credit. "I'm just glad I can offer a place for the bikers. The volunteers here can never get enough thanks for what they do," she said. "Many of them come in on Friday, and they come from all over the state. Some spend the night in hotels and they are out here early in the morning. Many have been coming here since the beginning. "The ladies must bake all sum- mer and freeze baked goods. Every year it keeps getting bet- teL" Pennsylvania transplant Polly moved to Milton in 1949 from her home in central Pennsylvania to begin her life with Ted, who had his own electri- cal business. She has lived in the family home ever since. "It was a big shock to me because I had never seen the ocean and so much flat land." Although she has worked as a secretary, most of her life has been spent as a housewife. "I'm from that time when women stayed home and raised the children. It's a luxury now," she said. She has two daughters, Susan Edwards who lives in Dover, and Carol Workman who lives in Atlanta, one grandchild and two great-grandchildren. A staunch Democrat, Polly loves to keep up on the news. She reads two daily newspapers and most weekly newspapers. "A lot of people think I'm nosey, but I like to read and keep up on what is going on. I'm inter- ested in local politics too," she said. She was impressed when she met Ferris Wharton, a Republican, one of the riders in the MS Bike to the Bay. He stopped by Uncle Ted's. "He has my vote if r nothing else what he did to prose- cute the Capano case," she said. But, she refuses to join the com- puter age. "I don't want one. There is no privacy anymore with Big Brother watching every- thing." She doesn't like a lot of what she sees in the national news, especially the recent rash of school shootings. "It's hard to figure out what is wrong with people. Do they watch too much TV and then copy it?" she asked. Polly is making sure that her husband's legacy continues, and the MS Bike to the Bay cyclists always have a place to stop and rest - and get scrapple sandwich- es. Polly said she has met thou- sands of participants in the bike tour over the years, and every one of them has been polite and thank- ful for Uncle Ted's. And she admires them for help- ing to fight a dreaded disease. "I've written in my will that my daughters still provide this space for them," Polly said. Polly sits down in one of two rocking chairs in her porch. The rain is letting up and she needs a refill on her coffee. A few bicyclists pull in and smile when they get a scrapple sandwich. Polly smiles, too, as they wave. The rain stops and the sun is coming out in the western sky. The last of the cyclists pull out of Uncle Ted's stop, clip into their pedals and bike away. The cycle of Polly's life is com- plete for another year.