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26 - CAPE GAZETTE - Tuesday, October 10 - Thursday, October 12, 2006 HEAUrH &: FITNESS New website links patients to information Go Local helps consumers find reliable medical help By Molly Albertson Cape Gazette staff Technology and medicine have a long, productive marriage. For years, scientists have brought new tools and procedures into the operating room, doctor's office and into new medications. State officials are now using technolo- gy to make it easier for patients to get accurate healthcare informa- tion. Gone are the days of long online searches or randomly thumbing through phonebooks to find a doctor, pharmacy or health- care service. With them go the days of n@ kning if a ebsite can be trtted d iiXthe'infora - tion is up to date. There are mil- lions of websites that claim to have accurate information, but people have no guarantee, and that can be dangerous when health is on the line. A new website, http://medline- plus.gov/delaware, makes up-to- date, accurate information avail- able at a keystroke. From a hang- nail to prenatal care, the site - called Go Local - helps connect consumers with providers, and the information is backed by the Delaware Academy of Medicine. The site includes information on day-care centers, family physi- cians, nursing homes and cancer, Molly Albertson photo Wendy Tindall, left, a youth services librarian at Rehoboth Beach Public Lttwary, listens to Patty Hartmannsgruber explain=Go cal a wbsite produced, bY o:the Delaware y of:Me to lp nsrs find curate health- :heinfoion andocal . sices, website is  ttp'.//tedlieplusgov/delawar. among many other things, and is organized by county or ZIP code. The website isn't just a list of local doctors. It includes alterna- tive medicine and homeopathic options as well as topics relating to all sorts of health. Mental health issues, such as eating disor- ders, drug abuse and emotional problems, are explained, with statewide lists of doctors and other providers and links to pri- vate websites, phone numbers and addresses of specialists. About 17 other states or areas have websites with Go Local directories, and the academy k.: wanted Delaware residents to have the same tool, instead of wading through a dark sea of shaky information. The organiza- tion saw a need for information that people could trust, but also practical With information on local practitioners. "The directory is specific to Delaware agencies so it augments your search when looking for healthcare information," said P.I. Frier, director of library and infor- mation services. Collecting all those numbers, websites and locations took the academy almost two years. The staff used guidebooks released by the state department of health to ensure accuracy. From there they gathered other agencies not listed in the books. "I got a lot from newspaper's health sections, from meeting people who own services, from everywhere," said Patty Hartmannsgruber, a consumer health librarian for the academy. The database is constantly being updated as new doctors move into the area, new physical therapy offices open, and agencies move. "If there's something on there you don't see or something we should add, please let us know," Hartmannsgruber said. The website will supplement other medical resources. "It'll be great for doctors to refer patients for accurate healthcare informa- tion," said Jean Winstead, health sciences librarian at Beebe Medical Center. "Often information has too many medical terms for patients," she said. Winstead said this will be better than going to a broad search engine because it directs patients to local care. "It's extremely important that patients have accurate health informa- tion," Winstead said. Eileen Vaughn, librarian for Beebe School of Nursing, said the website will be a resource for her students. "This is a good way to get trusted information. It's not like they just Googled it," she said. Beyond nursing students, the website is a resource for any lay- man or anyone who needs infor- mation in simple terms. "I use it daily," Vaughn said. She goes to the website to help explain med- ical terms or healthcare concerns to patients. "People need this because it's so helpful," Vaughn said. The website can also be a huge help to seniors who are looking for specific healthcare solutions. "I was pretty impressed and it's easy enough to get around and maneuver. Some seniors aren't real comfortable with computers," said Becky Madden, marketing specialist at CHEER. She said the CHEER center directors can help seniors use the website to learn more about their options in healthcare. "It will be a real tool for them," Madden said. Where to find it Even people who don't have computers can take advantage of this website. Local librarians are excited about the new program and are anxious to help patrons use it. "This is really great," said Wendy Tindall, youth services librarian at Rehoboth Beach Public Library. She said even children and teens could learn about illnesses or any healthcare issue on this website. From any computer go to http://medlineplus.gov/delaware to seek local medical information. Reflexology helps the body restore balance, health Many people are unfamiliar with reflexology and what it can do for them. It is an ancient art that dates back to 4000 B.C. in ancient China and has historical records in Japan, India and Egypt. Reflexology flourished more than 4,550 years ago with physicians using it as a means of balance and stimulus for the body to heal from broken bones, so pictorial and hieroglyphic of the practice that vital to today's practitioners. In 1979, a pictograph was dis- covered on the tomb on Ankhmaahar located in Saqqara, a tomb of a physician dating to 2330 B.C. This is the third oldest record of reflexology to date. In the drawing, the physician was grasping the toe and the thumb while the patient touched a reflex area under the arm. In ancient times, reflexology was used to diagnose and treat patients. Records of the Buddha's foot in Japan and India show some of the reqex lints associated with body parts and their effect on varied systems of the human HEALTH TOPICS David Patterson body. In Europe and the United States, reflexology has been a more recent development and a help in the body's ability to handle pain. One of the largest groups of people who understood and uti- lized reflexology for health has been and still is the Amish. Reflexology is a discipline that concentrates on reflex points on the feet, hands and ears. Gentle to firm pressure is applied to all areas of the feet, hands and ears by means of thumb or finger walking to stimulate the reflex points and thus balance the associ- ated body systems. It's three main purposes are to reduce stress and promote relax- ation, to balance the performance of all body organs and systems by eliminating congestion, and to alleviate pain and discomfort by allowing the DC electrical current of the nervous system to transport messages to the thalamus and brain so that these organs can transmit balancing messages to all the body parts. The goal of reflexology is to encourage the body to heal itself and achieve homeostasis. In other words, reflexology's purpose is to have the body, the mind and the spirit function in harmony to do what the body is made to do - heal. In today's world, with all its stress and strain, we try to bal- ance, often unsuccessfully. The art and science of reflexology is a great means of relaxing so that the body can perform at its peak. While seated in a chair, the practi- tioner stimulates the feet, based on charts that show the associa- tion of these points with the body systems and specific organs. When areas of tenderness are felt, concentrated pressure is applied to the point to promote the body to send the appropriate nor- malizing messages to the brain to the point to promote the body to send the" appropriate normalizing messages to the brain, which in turn sends these instructions to those systems and organs. These areas are noted on client records for future reference. This allows the client's body to have improved blood and lymphatic supply and improved nerve mes- saging to various systems by re- patterning the message sent to and from the brain via the body's neu- ral, electrical system. In this process, the body is persuaded to balance biologically. An added benefit from this is stress release and deep relaxation. Reflexology is not massage therapy but rather a discipline of itself. It is a form of energy work derived from acupressure and other disciplines that are energy related. As one form of comple- mentary disciplines or integrative modalities, it is service that encourages all other services to obtain maximum benefit. A reflexologist should never prescribe or diagnose because that is the scope of medical practice. A dedicated reflexologist will sug- gest all things beyond his scope of practice. A dedicated reflexologist will suggest all things beyond his scope of practice to a qualified professional. Contraindications are minimal for reflexology, but if in doubt, ask your physician. Editor's note: David Patterson is an instructor of reflexology at Delaware Technical & Community College, a member and vice president of the Delaware Board of Massage and Bodyworks and a national certi- fled practitioner and teacher. He can be contacted at trailblazer- sholisiicministries@msn.com or by calling 745-3595. " 26 - CAPE GAZETTE - Tuesday, October 10 - Thursday, October 12, 2006 HEAUrH &: FITNESS New website links patients to information Go Local helps consumers find reliable medical help By Molly Albertson Cape Gazette staff Technology and medicine have a long, productive marriage. For years, scientists have brought new tools and procedures into the operating room, doctor's office and into new medications. State officials are now using technolo- gy to make it easier for patients to get accurate healthcare informa- tion. Gone are the days of long online searches or randomly thumbing through phonebooks to find a doctor, pharmacy or health- care service. With them go the days of n@ kning if a ebsite can be trtted d iiXthe'infora - tion is up to date. There are mil- lions of websites that claim to have accurate information, but people have no guarantee, and that can be dangerous when health is on the line. A new website, http://medline- plus.gov/delaware, makes up-to- date, accurate information avail- able at a keystroke. From a hang- nail to prenatal care, the site - called Go Local - helps connect consumers with providers, and the information is backed by the Delaware Academy of Medicine. The site includes information on day-care centers, family physi- cians, nursing homes and cancer, Molly Albertson photo Wendy Tindall, left, a youth services librarian at Rehoboth Beach Public Lttwary, listens to Patty Hartmannsgruber explain=Go cal a wbsite produced, bY o:the Delaware y of:Me to lp nsrs find curate health- :heinfoion andocal . sices, website is  ttp'.//tedlieplusgov/delawar. among many other things, and is organized by county or ZIP code. The website isn't just a list of local doctors. It includes alterna- tive medicine and homeopathic options as well as topics relating to all sorts of health. Mental health issues, such as eating disor- ders, drug abuse and emotional problems, are explained, with statewide lists of doctors and other providers and links to pri- vate websites, phone numbers and addresses of specialists. About 17 other states or areas have websites with Go Local directories, and the academy k.: wanted Delaware residents to have the same tool, instead of wading through a dark sea of shaky information. The organiza- tion saw a need for information that people could trust, but also practical With information on local practitioners. "The directory is specific to Delaware agencies so it augments your search when looking for healthcare information," said P.I. Frier, director of library and infor- mation services. Collecting all those numbers, websites and locations took the academy almost two years. The staff used guidebooks released by the state department of health to ensure accuracy. From there they gathered other agencies not listed in the books. "I got a lot from newspaper's health sections, from meeting people who own services, from everywhere," said Patty Hartmannsgruber, a consumer health librarian for the academy. The database is constantly being updated as new doctors move into the area, new physical therapy offices open, and agencies move. "If there's something on there you don't see or something we should add, please let us know," Hartmannsgruber said. The website will supplement other medical resources. "It'll be great for doctors to refer patients for accurate healthcare informa- tion," said Jean Winstead, health sciences librarian at Beebe Medical Center. "Often information has too many medical terms for patients," she said. Winstead said this will be better than going to a broad search engine because it directs patients to local care. "It's extremely important that patients have accurate health informa- tion," Winstead said. Eileen Vaughn, librarian for Beebe School of Nursing, said the website will be a resource for her students. "This is a good way to get trusted information. It's not like they just Googled it," she said. Beyond nursing students, the website is a resource for any lay- man or anyone who needs infor- mation in simple terms. "I use it daily," Vaughn said. She goes to the website to help explain med- ical terms or healthcare concerns to patients. "People need this because it's so helpful," Vaughn said. The website can also be a huge help to seniors who are looking for specific healthcare solutions. "I was pretty impressed and it's easy enough to get around and maneuver. Some seniors aren't real comfortable with computers," said Becky Madden, marketing specialist at CHEER. She said the CHEER center directors can help seniors use the website to learn more about their options in healthcare. "It will be a real tool for them," Madden said. Where to find it Even people who don't have computers can take advantage of this website. Local librarians are excited about the new program and are anxious to help patrons use it. "This is really great," said Wendy Tindall, youth services librarian at Rehoboth Beach Public Library. She said even children and teens could learn about illnesses or any healthcare issue on this website. From any computer go to http://medlineplus.gov/delaware to seek local medical information. Reflexology helps the body restore balance, health Many people are unfamiliar with reflexology and what it can do for them. It is an ancient art that dates back to 4000 B.C. in ancient China and has historical records in Japan, India and Egypt. Reflexology flourished more than 4,550 years ago with physicians using it as a means of balance and stimulus for the body to heal from broken bones, so pictorial and hieroglyphic of the practice that vital to today's practitioners. In 1979, a pictograph was dis- covered on the tomb on Ankhmaahar located in Saqqara, a tomb of a physician dating to 2330 B.C. This is the third oldest record of reflexology to date. In the drawing, the physician was grasping the toe and the thumb while the patient touched a reflex area under the arm. In ancient times, reflexology was used to diagnose and treat patients. Records of the Buddha's foot in Japan and India show some of the reqex lints associated with body parts and their effect on varied systems of the human HEALTH TOPICS David Patterson body. In Europe and the United States, reflexology has been a more recent development and a help in the body's ability to handle pain. One of the largest groups of people who understood and uti- lized reflexology for health has been and still is the Amish. Reflexology is a discipline that concentrates on reflex points on the feet, hands and ears. Gentle to firm pressure is applied to all areas of the feet, hands and ears by means of thumb or finger walking to stimulate the reflex points and thus balance the associ- ated body systems. It's three main purposes are to reduce stress and promote relax- ation, to balance the performance of all body organs and systems by eliminating congestion, and to alleviate pain and discomfort by allowing the DC electrical current of the nervous system to transport messages to the thalamus and brain so that these organs can transmit balancing messages to all the body parts. The goal of reflexology is to encourage the body to heal itself and achieve homeostasis. In other words, reflexology's purpose is to have the body, the mind and the spirit function in harmony to do what the body is made to do - heal. In today's world, with all its stress and strain, we try to bal- ance, often unsuccessfully. The art and science of reflexology is a great means of relaxing so that the body can perform at its peak. While seated in a chair, the practi- tioner stimulates the feet, based on charts that show the associa- tion of these points with the body systems and specific organs. When areas of tenderness are felt, concentrated pressure is applied to the point to promote the body to send the appropriate nor- malizing messages to the brain to the point to promote the body to send the" appropriate normalizing messages to the brain, which in turn sends these instructions to those systems and organs. These areas are noted on client records for future reference. This allows the client's body to have improved blood and lymphatic supply and improved nerve mes- saging to various systems by re- patterning the message sent to and from the brain via the body's neu- ral, electrical system. In this process, the body is persuaded to balance biologically. An added benefit from this is stress release and deep relaxation. Reflexology is not massage therapy but rather a discipline of itself. It is a form of energy work derived from acupressure and other disciplines that are energy related. As one form of comple- mentary disciplines or integrative modalities, it is service that encourages all other services to obtain maximum benefit. A reflexologist should never prescribe or diagnose because that is the scope of medical practice. A dedicated reflexologist will sug- gest all things beyond his scope of practice. A dedicated reflexologist will suggest all things beyond his scope of practice to a qualified professional. Contraindications are minimal for reflexology, but if in doubt, ask your physician. Editor's note: David Patterson is an instructor of reflexology at Delaware Technical & Community College, a member and vice president of the Delaware Board of Massage and Bodyworks and a national certi- fled practitioner and teacher. He can be contacted at trailblazer- sholisiicministries@msn.com or by calling 745-3595. "