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Lewes, Delaware
Jim's Towing Service
October 15, 2004     Cape Gazette
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October 15, 2004
 

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62 - CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, Oct. 15 - Oct. 18, 2004 CAPE LIFE Prime H00:,ok host00 annual waterfowl festi0000al Milford musician Junior Wilson, whose skill on stringed instruments has wowed listeners since he was seven years old, kept people's toes tapping and bodies swaying through- out the waterfowl festival at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge. A master of sound technology, Wilson uses eight recorders to provide percussion, backup vocals and instru- ment accompaniments to his solo performances. By Jim Cresson Seventeen hundred visitors immersed themselves in the interacti,e displays and special events at the third annual waterfowl festival at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, Oct. 9. Sussex Bird Club hosted several birding tours dur- ing the daylong event. People enjoyed the music of Junior Wilson, and youngsters enjoyed the many nature and conservation displays under a big tent on the refuge grounds. Hunters enjoyed the display of antique fowling guns, and nature lovers enjoyed displays by the .... :i Marine Fish Conservation Network and the Marine Education, Research and Rehabilitation (MERR) Institute. Fifty-seven people competed in a photo contest, providing visitors with a grand display of 174 beau- tiful contest entries. The grand prizewinner for the photo contest was Earl West, who also took first place in the Delaware scenery and nature and wildlife categories. Dick Rhoads won the native plants and flowers contest, and Abigail Davis won the student competition. Continued on page 63 Jim Cresson photos Three-time world champion goose caller Keith McGowan of Middletown showed his form and sounded a series of long calls designed to bring the big birds into gun range. We're talking about your mothers and daughte rs October is more than just a time for festivals, harvesting, politick- ing and holidays. Although these are as good as any reason to cele- brate 30 days, October is also National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Although some men are stricken by this dis- ease, the majority of victims are women. Lest you think this is mundane news, I'll just remind you that we are talking about your mothers, daughters; sisters, aunts, grand- mothers and friends. In other words, people who are by defini- tion the back bone of our society. Breast cancer knows no bound- aries when it comes to stalldng its prey. Because I am a survivor, so far, of this disease, I always advocate relating personal experiences in the hope that it helps someone out there get treatment or go through treatment. Everyone's coping mechanism is different and as many avenues AROUND TOWN as possible need to be explored when treatment looms on the hori- zon. I've read where some women break down over the initial shock upon being told of their diagnosis. I'm one of those denial women. Anything suspicious will just nat- urally go my way. I am the origi- nal "Even Stephen." My first reaction when being told there was something on a mammogram was one of irrita- 1ion. The irritation was over the fact that no one can do a test right the fnst time, so now I would have to go back, which was another waste of time and have it redone. Right? I mean I'd been having this done for years. I have no history of can- cer in my family. In fact, we are a very complacent group that con- veniently just drops dead in our tracks of a heart attack when the time has come. So why jump to conclusions. I clung to the fact that 80 percent of lumps are not malignant. It didn't matter if that was a legitimate figure now, it was my life .line. When I learned the truth, that it was indeed a malignant mass, my first thought was to go shopping. After all, I really needed to buy myself something. If I was shop- ping it couldn't be true. Feeling sorry for myself takes the place of tears. I think in psychiatric terms it's called massive denial. I never had the spunk to declare that I could beat this disease. My. outlook was a little more coward- ly; I didn't want the disease to think I was declaring an all-out war and get even madder at me. No, I hid my cards close to my vest and took the outlook that I can cope with this if I take it one step at a time. I never looked beyond surgery. And then I never looked beyond chemotherapy. And then I never looked beyond radiation. And then One day all that stuff was over with and I had little sprouts growing on the top of my head. My skin had turned from a pale gray to a slight tinge of pink. My nails started to grow again. And then on a very special day, I woke up and I wasn't sick to my stom- ach. In fact, I didn't throw up once that day, or the next day, or the next. A lot of people have asked me now, looking back, how did you do it? I can tell you it isn't how you do it, it's how everyone else does it with you. I recently found the folder I'd put away that held all the cards and letters from friends and some from people I didn't even know. They all want you to getover this. They all pray for you. And they all offer any kind of help possible. That's how you get through breast cancer, as they say in the song, "with a little help from your friends." I would offer to you that if you know anyone who has breast can- cer, this month especially, try to reach out. They will have good days and they will have bad days. I am reminded of a line from Anne Morrow's "Gift From the Sea, "When the heart is flooded with love, there is no room for fear, for doubt, for hesitation. And remem- ber to bake biscuits on those bad days." ' "- " .....  .... | | I TIT | ]1[ 'T'F |ilillinitilnilitm IRIIIiIIIII I r[lll]['Tl" "iTI [ ' " l'rTrlHrlT Tl "T!" IHIT'lllIr]IT"I]I I TT :  ...... " - -, ........ [" ! " - 62 - CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, Oct. 15 - Oct. 18, 2004 CAPE LIFE Prime H00:,ok host00 annual waterfowl festi0000al Milford musician Junior Wilson, whose skill on stringed instruments has wowed listeners since he was seven years old, kept people's toes tapping and bodies swaying through- out the waterfowl festival at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge. A master of sound technology, Wilson uses eight recorders to provide percussion, backup vocals and instru- ment accompaniments to his solo performances. By Jim Cresson Seventeen hundred visitors immersed themselves in the interacti,e displays and special events at the third annual waterfowl festival at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, Oct. 9. Sussex Bird Club hosted several birding tours dur- ing the daylong event. People enjoyed the music of Junior Wilson, and youngsters enjoyed the many nature and conservation displays under a big tent on the refuge grounds. Hunters enjoyed the display of antique fowling guns, and nature lovers enjoyed displays by the .... :i Marine Fish Conservation Network and the Marine Education, Research and Rehabilitation (MERR) Institute. Fifty-seven people competed in a photo contest, providing visitors with a grand display of 174 beau- tiful contest entries. The grand prizewinner for the photo contest was Earl West, who also took first place in the Delaware scenery and nature and wildlife categories. Dick Rhoads won the native plants and flowers contest, and Abigail Davis won the student competition. Continued on page 63 Jim Cresson photos Three-time world champion goose caller Keith McGowan of Middletown showed his form and sounded a series of long calls designed to bring the big birds into gun range. We're talking about your mothers and daughte rs October is more than just a time for festivals, harvesting, politick- ing and holidays. Although these are as good as any reason to cele- brate 30 days, October is also National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Although some men are stricken by this dis- ease, the majority of victims are women. Lest you think this is mundane news, I'll just remind you that we are talking about your mothers, daughters; sisters, aunts, grand- mothers and friends. In other words, people who are by defini- tion the back bone of our society. Breast cancer knows no bound- aries when it comes to stalldng its prey. Because I am a survivor, so far, of this disease, I always advocate relating personal experiences in the hope that it helps someone out there get treatment or go through treatment. Everyone's coping mechanism is different and as many avenues AROUND TOWN as possible need to be explored when treatment looms on the hori- zon. I've read where some women break down over the initial shock upon being told of their diagnosis. I'm one of those denial women. Anything suspicious will just nat- urally go my way. I am the origi- nal "Even Stephen." My first reaction when being told there was something on a mammogram was one of irrita- 1ion. The irritation was over the fact that no one can do a test right the fnst time, so now I would have to go back, which was another waste of time and have it redone. Right? I mean I'd been having this done for years. I have no history of can- cer in my family. In fact, we are a very complacent group that con- veniently just drops dead in our tracks of a heart attack when the time has come. So why jump to conclusions. I clung to the fact that 80 percent of lumps are not malignant. It didn't matter if that was a legitimate figure now, it was my life .line. When I learned the truth, that it was indeed a malignant mass, my first thought was to go shopping. After all, I really needed to buy myself something. If I was shop- ping it couldn't be true. Feeling sorry for myself takes the place of tears. I think in psychiatric terms it's called massive denial. I never had the spunk to declare that I could beat this disease. My. outlook was a little more coward- ly; I didn't want the disease to think I was declaring an all-out war and get even madder at me. No, I hid my cards close to my vest and took the outlook that I can cope with this if I take it one step at a time. I never looked beyond surgery. And then I never looked beyond chemotherapy. And then I never looked beyond radiation. And then One day all that stuff was over with and I had little sprouts growing on the top of my head. My skin had turned from a pale gray to a slight tinge of pink. My nails started to grow again. And then on a very special day, I woke up and I wasn't sick to my stom- ach. In fact, I didn't throw up once that day, or the next day, or the next. A lot of people have asked me now, looking back, how did you do it? I can tell you it isn't how you do it, it's how everyone else does it with you. I recently found the folder I'd put away that held all the cards and letters from friends and some from people I didn't even know. They all want you to getover this. They all pray for you. And they all offer any kind of help possible. That's how you get through breast cancer, as they say in the song, "with a little help from your friends." I would offer to you that if you know anyone who has breast can- cer, this month especially, try to reach out. They will have good days and they will have bad days. I am reminded of a line from Anne Morrow's "Gift From the Sea, "When the heart is flooded with love, there is no room for fear, for doubt, for hesitation. And remem- ber to bake biscuits on those bad days." ' "- " .....  .... | | I TIT | ]1[ 'T'F |ilillinitilnilitm IRIIIiIIIII I r[lll]['Tl" "iTI [ ' " l'rTrlHrlT Tl "T!" IHIT'lllIr]IT"I]I I TT :  ...... " - -, ........ [" ! " -