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Lewes, Delaware
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October 15, 2004     Cape Gazette
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October 15, 2004
 

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64 - CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, Oct. 15 - Oct. 18, 2004 Local author pens new horror novel Maggie Beelz photo Horror novelist and Mills- boro resident Eric Enck will sign his new mystery, "Tell Me Your Name" Nov. 6 at At- lantic Books on Highway 1. By Maggie Beetz Millsboro resident Eric Enck will be signing copies of his new horror novel, "Tell Me Your Name," this month in Delaware bookstores. Enck's debut novel is based on childhood memories and local folklore of his hometown of Ephrata, Pa., a town in the heart of Pennsylvania Dutch country known for being haunted. "Tell Me your Name" is the sto- ry of a serial killer who terrifies the townspeople of Shallow Front. Sleep-deprived detective Trent Holloway's failed attempts to catch the killer begin to uncover mysterious clues- like finding dead people's fingerprints at crime scenes. Enck will appear for a book signing Nov. 6 at Atlantic Books on Highway 1. But for those who can't wait until then, other read- ings will be from 2 to 5 p.m. Sat- urday, Oct. 23, at Waldenbooks in Dover Mall; 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 30, at B. Daltons in The Cen- ter at Salisbury; and Sunday, Oct. 31, at Atlantic Books in Salisbury. Enck moved to Millsboro from Ephrata, a town of about 13,000 people, seven years ago. Accord- ing to Enck, 90 percent of the town is haunted. He said he grew up down the street from a haunted mansion, which he had to pass every day'on his way to school. He said it was originally a hospital that was known for excessive cas- es of malpractice; it is known lo- cally today as "the meat-locker." It was later turned into a bed and breakfast before being abandoned completely in 1974. Enek recently I I received permission from Ephrata police to write his fifth novel in- side the abandoned structure. "I think the most passionate times in the world are after the most horrifying," Enck said. Enck has enjoyed writing horror since age 15, when he began to keep a journal of his observations and the stories he heard growing up. Through these stories he devel- oped a fascination with horror that led him to such authors as James Patterson and Clyde Bark- er. Enek said his greatest influence is Edgar Allen Poe, who he began reading at a young age, his fa- vorite story being "The Masque of the Red Death." Enck also likes the "rawness of early [Stephen] King," for example "Carrie," which King wrote when he was Enck's age, 28. In addition to the haunted set- ting of his youth, Enck says that he gets inspiration from his dreams. "I have vivid nightmares every night," he said. "I used to fear them, but now I hope for them." He sees his dreams as "fu- el for the fire." Other story ideas come from walking through cemeteries. Enck says that he'll bring his tape recorder and wander around until he sees a particularly intriguing headstone and then use what little information he has - name, age and occasional epitaph, to make up stories about what happened. Enck also gets inspiration from drawing. He says when a particu- lar image strikes him, he will sketch it and later expand it into a story idea within his novels. Enck says he does most of his writing at night, sometimes straight through to the following day. "It consumes me," he said. During the day he works as a bill collector for an auto parts store in Georgetown. Enck lives in Mills- boro with his wife and their 4- year-old son, Mason. ''Tell Me Your Name," released Friday, Oct.15, is the first sus- pense thriller released by inde- pendent publisher Teri Woods. According to Teri Woods Publish- ing, the company has sold more than 1 million eopiis collectively of its rifles, which the company says is .an aceomplishmont for an independent publishing house. Bring used glasses to Lions Walk for Sight Sunday, Oct, 17 The Lions Club in Delaware invites the communi- ty to join them for in their fight to restore sight. By participating, individuals will join the Lions in their mission to restore sight. Participants are asked to bring their used eyeglass- es to Gate 1 on Sunday, Oct. 17, during.,the Lions Walk for Sight and Auction at Dover !fiernational. Spelway's Monster Mile. Walk registration is at 12:30; the walk begins at 1 p.m. The auction will be held following the walk at 3:30 p.m. For more information, call 539-3498, 684-8833 or 302-798-3407. "Tell Me Your Name" by local author Eric Enck comes out Friday, Oct. 15. BRACE YOURSELF - IT'S HALLOWEEN! Sussex Dr. Michael A. Poleck 1632 Savannah Rd., Suite 6 Lewes, DE (302) 644-4100 rediscover. TERRIFIC TUESDAYS 15% Off All Services with Jessica or Karen } 310 Ave. DE 19971 64 - CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, Oct. 15 - Oct. 18, 2004 Local author pens new horror novel Maggie Beelz photo Horror novelist and Mills- boro resident Eric Enck will sign his new mystery, "Tell Me Your Name" Nov. 6 at At- lantic Books on Highway 1. By Maggie Beetz Millsboro resident Eric Enck will be signing copies of his new horror novel, "Tell Me Your Name," this month in Delaware bookstores. Enck's debut novel is based on childhood memories and local folklore of his hometown of Ephrata, Pa., a town in the heart of Pennsylvania Dutch country known for being haunted. "Tell Me your Name" is the sto- ry of a serial killer who terrifies the townspeople of Shallow Front. Sleep-deprived detective Trent Holloway's failed attempts to catch the killer begin to uncover mysterious clues- like finding dead people's fingerprints at crime scenes. Enck will appear for a book signing Nov. 6 at Atlantic Books on Highway 1. But for those who can't wait until then, other read- ings will be from 2 to 5 p.m. Sat- urday, Oct. 23, at Waldenbooks in Dover Mall; 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 30, at B. Daltons in The Cen- ter at Salisbury; and Sunday, Oct. 31, at Atlantic Books in Salisbury. Enck moved to Millsboro from Ephrata, a town of about 13,000 people, seven years ago. Accord- ing to Enck, 90 percent of the town is haunted. He said he grew up down the street from a haunted mansion, which he had to pass every day'on his way to school. He said it was originally a hospital that was known for excessive cas- es of malpractice; it is known lo- cally today as "the meat-locker." It was later turned into a bed and breakfast before being abandoned completely in 1974. Enek recently I I received permission from Ephrata police to write his fifth novel in- side the abandoned structure. "I think the most passionate times in the world are after the most horrifying," Enck said. Enck has enjoyed writing horror since age 15, when he began to keep a journal of his observations and the stories he heard growing up. Through these stories he devel- oped a fascination with horror that led him to such authors as James Patterson and Clyde Bark- er. Enek said his greatest influence is Edgar Allen Poe, who he began reading at a young age, his fa- vorite story being "The Masque of the Red Death." Enck also likes the "rawness of early [Stephen] King," for example "Carrie," which King wrote when he was Enck's age, 28. In addition to the haunted set- ting of his youth, Enck says that he gets inspiration from his dreams. "I have vivid nightmares every night," he said. "I used to fear them, but now I hope for them." He sees his dreams as "fu- el for the fire." Other story ideas come from walking through cemeteries. Enck says that he'll bring his tape recorder and wander around until he sees a particularly intriguing headstone and then use what little information he has - name, age and occasional epitaph, to make up stories about what happened. Enck also gets inspiration from drawing. He says when a particu- lar image strikes him, he will sketch it and later expand it into a story idea within his novels. Enck says he does most of his writing at night, sometimes straight through to the following day. "It consumes me," he said. During the day he works as a bill collector for an auto parts store in Georgetown. Enck lives in Mills- boro with his wife and their 4- year-old son, Mason. ''Tell Me Your Name," released Friday, Oct.15, is the first sus- pense thriller released by inde- pendent publisher Teri Woods. According to Teri Woods Publish- ing, the company has sold more than 1 million eopiis collectively of its rifles, which the company says is .an aceomplishmont for an independent publishing house. Bring used glasses to Lions Walk for Sight Sunday, Oct, 17 The Lions Club in Delaware invites the communi- ty to join them for in their fight to restore sight. By participating, individuals will join the Lions in their mission to restore sight. Participants are asked to bring their used eyeglass- es to Gate 1 on Sunday, Oct. 17, during.,the Lions Walk for Sight and Auction at Dover !fiernational. Spelway's Monster Mile. Walk registration is at 12:30; the walk begins at 1 p.m. The auction will be held following the walk at 3:30 p.m. For more information, call 539-3498, 684-8833 or 302-798-3407. "Tell Me Your Name" by local author Eric Enck comes out Friday, Oct. 15. BRACE YOURSELF - IT'S HALLOWEEN! Sussex Dr. Michael A. Poleck 1632 Savannah Rd., Suite 6 Lewes, DE (302) 644-4100 rediscover. TERRIFIC TUESDAYS 15% Off All Services with Jessica or Karen } 310 Ave. DE 19971