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October 15, 2004     Cape Gazette
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72 - CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, Oct. 15 - Oct. 18, 2004 Nanticokes celebrate renovations By Karl Chalabala Sussex County's oldest people have a new place to come togeth- er. The Nanticoke Indian Associa- tion (NIA) held an Oct. 9 open house to celebrate the completion of reconstruction efforts on the Nanticoke Indian Center on Route 24. "Sometimes it seemed like there was no light at the end of the tunnel," said Nanticoke Chief Tee Norwood of the four-month effort. "Sometimes it looked like the light at the end of the tunnel was a train." The site held the tribe's one- room schoolhouse from 1928 to 1948 when the state demolished that building and the Delaware Board of Education built the cur- rent structure. It served as the tribe's school until segregation ended following landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision Brown v. Board of Education in 1954. While the NIA used the build- ing as a meeting place, the state still owned the building until last June. The Delaware Legislature passed a bill, sponsored by Rep. John Atkins, R-Millsboro, and Sen. George Bunting, D-Bethany Beach, during the last general as- sembly to return the building to the tribe for $1. 'Tve had a good time with the fellowship of this group," Atldns said. "I do look at us as friends. I'm going to recommend a Delaware Historical Marker for this building. It may take us six to eight months so we should get the ball rolling." A $15,000 Capital Grant from the Delaware Community Foun- dation (DCF) enabled the tribe to renovate the inside of the build- ing. "'Because of the dedication of the members we were able to stretch it out," said renovation committee chair Shawn Wright. While the DCF gave the money, NIA members pitched in when they could. The center can now hold up to 80 people comfortably. Wright said he hoped the space would be used as a resource and learning center. Networked com- puter workstations, donated by Beebe Medical Center, and a new mounted projection system enable state-of-the-art presentations. The removal of two support columns allows the Nanticoke dancers a place to practice rou- tines. Paint donated by Sherman Williams gave the walls a new color scheme. The kitchen was also renovated. "I look at who we are today as a Nanticoke people," Assistant Chief Larry Jackson said. "A lot of people think we are stagnant. "But we are moving. We are pro- gressing. The creator god is blessing us." Norwood said he hoped the entire community would use the building. To date, the Department of Transportation (DelDOT) has held a public work- shop there and the Delaware State Police held a Drug Identification and Substance Abuse Workshop. Wright said the center welcomes nonprofit groups as well. Call 945-3400 for details. Kad Chalabala photo Nanticoke Assistant Chief Larry Jackson arranged for each of the new center's contributors to receive a beaded wild turkey feather. "The wild turkey is a very smart bird with keen hearing,  he said. "It took people working together with good hearing so they could Hsten to each other to make this happen. The four beads on the bottom - white, yellow, black and red - show how different people can come together to make something happen.  i DO YOU WISH TO BELONG TO A TRADITIONAL CHURCH, THAT HOLDS TO 60D'S WORD AS REVEALED IN THE HOLY SCRIPTURES? COME TO Saint 00ames 00[.glitan-C00ur@ GIFTS . CARDS , PRIDE . COLLECTIBLES 23269 Park Avenue, Georgetown Route 9 Truck Bypass 302-238-7364 Sunday Services 8 am & 10 am Wednesday 12 noon PAPASTAVROS' ASSOCIATES M EDICAL I MAGING L.L.C. r]"T l F- "TT-"rIWTIiTiINT- [ 7 'F -I I - I1-  | l[T-]Illl.l|IIlmlilIlIiil,lll IIIlllll ITlrT- Ill F J ..... FUTT'TTII"Tr" '7 72 - CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, Oct. 15 - Oct. 18, 2004 Nanticokes celebrate renovations By Karl Chalabala Sussex County's oldest people have a new place to come togeth- er. The Nanticoke Indian Associa- tion (NIA) held an Oct. 9 open house to celebrate the completion of reconstruction efforts on the Nanticoke Indian Center on Route 24. "Sometimes it seemed like there was no light at the end of the tunnel," said Nanticoke Chief Tee Norwood of the four-month effort. "Sometimes it looked like the light at the end of the tunnel was a train." The site held the tribe's one- room schoolhouse from 1928 to 1948 when the state demolished that building and the Delaware Board of Education built the cur- rent structure. It served as the tribe's school until segregation ended following landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision Brown v. Board of Education in 1954. While the NIA used the build- ing as a meeting place, the state still owned the building until last June. The Delaware Legislature passed a bill, sponsored by Rep. John Atkins, R-Millsboro, and Sen. George Bunting, D-Bethany Beach, during the last general as- sembly to return the building to the tribe for $1. 'Tve had a good time with the fellowship of this group," Atldns said. "I do look at us as friends. I'm going to recommend a Delaware Historical Marker for this building. It may take us six to eight months so we should get the ball rolling." A $15,000 Capital Grant from the Delaware Community Foun- dation (DCF) enabled the tribe to renovate the inside of the build- ing. "'Because of the dedication of the members we were able to stretch it out," said renovation committee chair Shawn Wright. While the DCF gave the money, NIA members pitched in when they could. The center can now hold up to 80 people comfortably. Wright said he hoped the space would be used as a resource and learning center. Networked com- puter workstations, donated by Beebe Medical Center, and a new mounted projection system enable state-of-the-art presentations. The removal of two support columns allows the Nanticoke dancers a place to practice rou- tines. Paint donated by Sherman Williams gave the walls a new color scheme. The kitchen was also renovated. "I look at who we are today as a Nanticoke people," Assistant Chief Larry Jackson said. "A lot of people think we are stagnant. "But we are moving. We are pro- gressing. The creator god is blessing us." Norwood said he hoped the entire community would use the building. To date, the Department of Transportation (DelDOT) has held a public work- shop there and the Delaware State Police held a Drug Identification and Substance Abuse Workshop. Wright said the center welcomes nonprofit groups as well. Call 945-3400 for details. Kad Chalabala photo Nanticoke Assistant Chief Larry Jackson arranged for each of the new center's contributors to receive a beaded wild turkey feather. "The wild turkey is a very smart bird with keen hearing,  he said. "It took people working together with good hearing so they could Hsten to each other to make this happen. The four beads on the bottom - white, yellow, black and red - show how different people can come together to make something happen.  i DO YOU WISH TO BELONG TO A TRADITIONAL CHURCH, THAT HOLDS TO 60D'S WORD AS REVEALED IN THE HOLY SCRIPTURES? COME TO Saint 00ames 00[.glitan-C00ur@ GIFTS . CARDS , PRIDE . COLLECTIBLES 23269 Park Avenue, Georgetown Route 9 Truck Bypass 302-238-7364 Sunday Services 8 am & 10 am Wednesday 12 noon PAPASTAVROS' ASSOCIATES M EDICAL I MAGING L.L.C. r]"T l F- "TT-"rIWTIiTiINT- [ 7 'F -I I - I1-  | l[T-]Illl.l|IIlmlilIlIiil,lll IIIlllll ITlrT- Ill F J ..... FUTT'TTII"Tr" '7