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30 - CAPE GAZETYE - Tuesday, October 17 - Thursday, October 19, 2006 Stretching, diet, medicine can relieve charley horse symptoms Q.: What exactly is a charley horse, and why do I get them in my legs at night? A.: According to the American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms, the term "charley horse" was fwst used in the 1880s by baseball players to describe a muscle cramp. No one knows the true origin, but the dictionary says: "Among the more-likely theories proposed is that it alludes to the name of either a horse or an afflicted ball player who limped like one of the elderly draft horses formerly employed to drag the infield." Geezers are more likely to get charley horses because of muscle loss that starts in our 40s. And your remaining muscles don't work as efficiently as they used to. Studies show that about 70 per- cent of adults older than 50 expe- HEALTHY GEEZER Fred Cicetti rience nocturnal leg cramps. A cramp is an involuntary con- tracted muscle that does not relax. The common locations for muscle cramps are the calves, thighs, feet, hands, arms, and the rib "cage. Cramps can be very painful. Muscles can cramp for just sec- onds, but they can continue for many minutes. Almost all of us have had mus- cle cramps, but no one knows for sure why they happen. However, many healthcare professionals attribute cramping to tired mus- cles and poOr stretching. Other suspected causes are dehydration, exerting yourself when it's hot, flat feet, standing on concrete, prolonged sitting, some leg positions while sedentary. Muscle cramps are usually harmless. However, they can also be symptoms of problems with circulation, nerves, metabolism and hormones. Less common causes of muscle cramps include diabetes, Parkinson's disease, hypo- glycemia, anemia, thyroid and endocrine disorders. If you experience frequent and severe muscle cramps, see your doctor. The use of some medications can cause muscle cramps. For example, some diuretic medica- tions prescribed for high blood pressu can deplete potassium. Too tittle potassium, calcium or magnesium in your diet can con- tribute to cramps. Here are some pointers for treating a cramp yourself: Stop whatever you were doing when you got the cramp, massage the muscle and stretch it slowly; apply a cold pack to relax tense muscles. To prevent cramps, do stretch- ing exercises especially for those muscles that tend to cramp, and drink water regularly. If you are exerting yourself in heat or sweat- ing for more than an hour, you should drink fruit juice or a sports beverage. For recurrent cramps that dis- turb your sleep, your doctor may prescribe a medication to relax your muscles. If you have nocturnal leg cramping, ride a stationary bicy- cle for a few minutes before bed- time. The following stretching exer- cise is good, too. You should do it in the morning, before dinner and before going to bed every night: Stand about 30 inches from a wall. Keep your heels on the floor, lean forward and put your hands on the wall. Then, move your hands slowly up the wall as far as you can reach comfortably. Hold the stretched position for 30 sec- onds. Release. Repeat twice. Editor's note: Fred Cicetti is a first-class geezer over 60 who writes a health column for senior citizens. Send questions to fredci- cetti @ gmail.com. Delaware Eye Surgery t,e] ter awarded highest level of accreditation The Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care Inc. (AAAHC) has again awarded the Delaware Eye Surgery Center its highest, three-year term of accred- itation. "The dedication and effort necessary for an organiza- tion to be accredited is substantial, Delaware Eye Surgery Center is to be commended for this accom- plishment," said AAAHC President Dr. Roy Grekin. Based on evidence following an exhaustive, on-site survey, AAAHC found that the Delaware Eye Surgery Center met and con- tinues to demonstrate the high quality of care standards set by Health Ministry Weekend set Oct. 20-21 Millsboro Seventh-day Ad- ventist Church will present Health Ministry Weekend Friday and Saturday, Oct. 20-21. Dr. Theodore Watkins will be providing a special health min- istry at 7 p.m., Oct. 20, and he will speak again at 11 a.m., Oct. 21. He will be available for ques- tions and answers later that after- noon, and he will have his health products for sale after sunset. For information call Melvina Tull at 945-2260. Report Continued from page 28 received by the commission, the Total Cost of Health Care report will be evaluated and additional data points considered in order to give policymakers the most com- plete snapshot of spending trends in Delaware and the nation. The report was prepared for the Commission by Simon Condliffe and Edward C. Ratledge of the Center for Applied Demography and Survey Research at the University of Delaware. AAAHC and Medicare. This survey included analysis of Delaware Eye Surgery Center's patient care and safety, surgical outcomes and commitment to ongoing self-evaluation and improvement. "This award underscores the commitment of our staff and physicians to the highest levels of patient care and safety," said Dr. David Robinson, Delaware Eye Surgery Center medical director. "We are proud to serve southern Delaware and equally proud of this accomplishment. In recent years we have added more advanced surgical procedures and technology as seen in the addition of retinal and glaucoma surgery programs. That we maintained the highest standards of care dur- ing this period of growth speaks highly of our commitment to our patients." "The nursing staff was recog- nized for their technical expertise, plus their bedside manner," said Joyce Hargreaves, RN, the cen- ter's director of nursing. "We're proud of the job our nurses have done in maintaining the high stan- dards of Delaware Eye Surgery Center." The Delaware Eye Surgery Center offers our region ocular surgery care for cataract extrac- tion, glaucoma, retinal repair, oculoplastics, adult strabismus, and laser vision correction (LASIK). Patients seeking ocular care may call 645-2300 for appointments or may visit www.delawareeye.com. Cape Surgical Associates proudly welcome Dr. Mudiwa Munyikwa, M.D., F.A.C.S. Dr. Munyikwa joins our practice as a full lime general, thoracic and vascular surgeon. He is board certified in General and Cardiothoracic surgery. His particular fields of interest are thoracic and vascular surgery. He was previously associated with Delaware Valley Physicians in Millsboro and Milford, DE. Dr. Munyikwa is currently seeing patients at our three locations, Lewes, Millville and Milford. For appointments, please call (302) 645-7050. When your doctor prescribes physical therapy to help you iecover from an illness or injury, you can count on Bayhealth. Physical therapy services are available by appointment by calling 302+30-5706. Bayhealth's Milton Outpatient Services also offers Lab, X-Ray and EKG. MIP,,oa Omtpatie rHwvi 424 Mulberry Street, Milton Lab, X-ray, EKG Semces: 302-Z010 Physical Therapy Services: 30Z.430-$706 major insurance plans indudi ca and Mecaid c. Cemer_ .................. 30 - CAPE GAZETYE - Tuesday, October 17 - Thursday, October 19, 2006 Stretching, diet, medicine can relieve charley horse symptoms Q.: What exactly is a charley horse, and why do I get them in my legs at night? A.: According to the American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms, the term "charley horse" was fwst used in the 1880s by baseball players to describe a muscle cramp. No one knows the true origin, but the dictionary says: "Among the more-likely theories proposed is that it alludes to the name of either a horse or an afflicted ball player who limped like one of the elderly draft horses formerly employed to drag the infield." Geezers are more likely to get charley horses because of muscle loss that starts in our 40s. And your remaining muscles don't work as efficiently as they used to. Studies show that about 70 per- cent of adults older than 50 expe- HEALTHY GEEZER Fred Cicetti rience nocturnal leg cramps. A cramp is an involuntary con- tracted muscle that does not relax. The common locations for muscle cramps are the calves, thighs, feet, hands, arms, and the rib "cage. Cramps can be very painful. Muscles can cramp for just sec- onds, but they can continue for many minutes. Almost all of us have had mus- cle cramps, but no one knows for sure why they happen. However, many healthcare professionals attribute cramping to tired mus- cles and poOr stretching. Other suspected causes are dehydration, exerting yourself when it's hot, flat feet, standing on concrete, prolonged sitting, some leg positions while sedentary. Muscle cramps are usually harmless. However, they can also be symptoms of problems with circulation, nerves, metabolism and hormones. Less common causes of muscle cramps include diabetes, Parkinson's disease, hypo- glycemia, anemia, thyroid and endocrine disorders. If you experience frequent and severe muscle cramps, see your doctor. The use of some medications can cause muscle cramps. For example, some diuretic medica- tions prescribed for high blood pressu can deplete potassium. Too tittle potassium, calcium or magnesium in your diet can con- tribute to cramps. Here are some pointers for treating a cramp yourself: Stop whatever you were doing when you got the cramp, massage the muscle and stretch it slowly; apply a cold pack to relax tense muscles. To prevent cramps, do stretch- ing exercises especially for those muscles that tend to cramp, and drink water regularly. If you are exerting yourself in heat or sweat- ing for more than an hour, you should drink fruit juice or a sports beverage. For recurrent cramps that dis- turb your sleep, your doctor may prescribe a medication to relax your muscles. If you have nocturnal leg cramping, ride a stationary bicy- cle for a few minutes before bed- time. The following stretching exer- cise is good, too. You should do it in the morning, before dinner and before going to bed every night: Stand about 30 inches from a wall. Keep your heels on the floor, lean forward and put your hands on the wall. Then, move your hands slowly up the wall as far as you can reach comfortably. Hold the stretched position for 30 sec- onds. Release. Repeat twice. Editor's note: Fred Cicetti is a first-class geezer over 60 who writes a health column for senior citizens. Send questions to fredci- cetti @ gmail.com. Delaware Eye Surgery t,e] ter awarded highest level of accreditation The Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care Inc. (AAAHC) has again awarded the Delaware Eye Surgery Center its highest, three-year term of accred- itation. "The dedication and effort necessary for an organiza- tion to be accredited is substantial, Delaware Eye Surgery Center is to be commended for this accom- plishment," said AAAHC President Dr. Roy Grekin. Based on evidence following an exhaustive, on-site survey, AAAHC found that the Delaware Eye Surgery Center met and con- tinues to demonstrate the high quality of care standards set by Health Ministry Weekend set Oct. 20-21 Millsboro Seventh-day Ad- ventist Church will present Health Ministry Weekend Friday and Saturday, Oct. 20-21. Dr. Theodore Watkins will be providing a special health min- istry at 7 p.m., Oct. 20, and he will speak again at 11 a.m., Oct. 21. He will be available for ques- tions and answers later that after- noon, and he will have his health products for sale after sunset. For information call Melvina Tull at 945-2260. Report Continued from page 28 received by the commission, the Total Cost of Health Care report will be evaluated and additional data points considered in order to give policymakers the most com- plete snapshot of spending trends in Delaware and the nation. The report was prepared for the Commission by Simon Condliffe and Edward C. Ratledge of the Center for Applied Demography and Survey Research at the University of Delaware. AAAHC and Medicare. This survey included analysis of Delaware Eye Surgery Center's patient care and safety, surgical outcomes and commitment to ongoing self-evaluation and improvement. "This award underscores the commitment of our staff and physicians to the highest levels of patient care and safety," said Dr. David Robinson, Delaware Eye Surgery Center medical director. "We are proud to serve southern Delaware and equally proud of this accomplishment. In recent years we have added more advanced surgical procedures and technology as seen in the addition of retinal and glaucoma surgery programs. That we maintained the highest standards of care dur- ing this period of growth speaks highly of our commitment to our patients." "The nursing staff was recog- nized for their technical expertise, plus their bedside manner," said Joyce Hargreaves, RN, the cen- ter's director of nursing. "We're proud of the job our nurses have done in maintaining the high stan- dards of Delaware Eye Surgery Center." The Delaware Eye Surgery Center offers our region ocular surgery care for cataract extrac- tion, glaucoma, retinal repair, oculoplastics, adult strabismus, and laser vision correction (LASIK). Patients seeking ocular care may call 645-2300 for appointments or may visit www.delawareeye.com. Cape Surgical Associates proudly welcome Dr. Mudiwa Munyikwa, M.D., F.A.C.S. Dr. Munyikwa joins our practice as a full lime general, thoracic and vascular surgeon. He is board certified in General and Cardiothoracic surgery. His particular fields of interest are thoracic and vascular surgery. He was previously associated with Delaware Valley Physicians in Millsboro and Milford, DE. Dr. Munyikwa is currently seeing patients at our three locations, Lewes, Millville and Milford. For appointments, please call (302) 645-7050. When your doctor prescribes physical therapy to help you iecover from an illness or injury, you can count on Bayhealth. Physical therapy services are available by appointment by calling 302+30-5706. Bayhealth's Milton Outpatient Services also offers Lab, X-Ray and EKG. MIP,,oa Omtpatie rHwvi 424 Mulberry Street, Milton Lab, X-ray, EKG Semces: 302-Z010 Physical Therapy Services: 30Z.430-$706 major insurance plans indudi ca and Mecaid c. Cemer_ ..................