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November 16, 2004     Cape Gazette
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November 16, 2004
 

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IINSIDE: 5O "The Price of Liberty Eternal Vigilance" Delaware's Cape Region Tuesday, November 16 - Thursday, November 18, 2004 www.capegazette.com Volume 12 No. 49 Canalfront Park in Lewes takes flight Donors honored, permits on the way By Hen J. Evans Jr. Excitement about the Lewes Canalfront Park was. palpable as Lewes Mayor Jim Ford on Sunday unveiled the burnished steel and Plexiglas plaque bearing the names of more than 500 people who have given money for the project. "This is just absolutely wonderful. This is what Lewes is all about," Ford said as the applause of more than 70 people filled the room. The gleaming plaque is on the wall of a building used as a net-repair house in the days when the menhaden fishing indus- try was dominant in Lewes. Sunday's event was also the kick-off of the campaign to raise $3.2 million to build the park along the banks of the Lewes- Rehoboth Canal just north of the canal bridge. The total cost of the project is $4.9 million; $1.7 "of that has already been raised. It was both a celebration of the acquisi- tion of property for the park and a thank- you to those who have given money for the project. "It's been nearly three years to the day- Sunday, November 11, 2001- that owner- ship of the Lewes Boatyard was transferred to the City of Lewes. Since that time a lot has taken place, much of it behind the scenes and out of the public's eye," Ford said. He said the numerous meetings with city residents to get their ideas and more meet- ings with state and federal agencies, to get their permission, are now behind them. "We're still in the later stages of Continued on page 8 Fantastic f'mish for Joey Davidson, left, and Brad Fawcett, studentsat the University of Delaware, check the sold out sign for any Steven Billups photo movies they planned to see during the Rehoboth Beach Film Festival held over the weekend. Film Fest By Karl Chalabala The audience at "the Rehoboth Beach Independent Film closing party Nov. 14 cheered wildly as founder Rob Rector announced the final tally of moviegoers. Over the five days of the festival, 19,273 people watched more than 81 films, fea- tures, documentaries and shorts, a 15 per- cent increase over last year's attendance of 16,800. Rector said the festival could only accommodate, at maximum, 22,660 peo- ple. The number of sold-out viewings was evidence of the rise in festival attendees. Last year, 32 films were sold-out. This year the number nearly doubled to 52 sold- out viewings. "We are almost at max capacity," Rector said after revealing the numbers. Rehoboth Beach Film Society program 7 ming director David Gold, in his first year Continued on page U Dewey Beach officials table action on gambling Council debates merits of charitable wagering By Jim Cresson The Dewey Beach commissioners are considering whether to amend town laws on charitable gambling, but after extensive ] debate Nov. 13, the issue was tabled until Dec. 11. "We don't need gambling for a charity event," said Commissioner Ellie Mayhew. "Many local charitable organizations use silent auctions and 50-50 raffles. That's fine with me." The issue arose after Highway One LLP advertised a Texas Hold 'em card game to benefit a Salisbury, Md.-based Marine Corps League's annual Toys for Tots cam- paign. The card game was to be held Nov. 13, if a charitable gambling license were obtained from the state Charitable Gaming Commission. Game participants were to be charged a $100 entrance fee to compete in the game at the BayCenter. The winner was to get a trip for two worth $2,000 to Las Vegas. Tickets for the game were advertised as bg.ing available by calling or visiting the Rusty Rudder. The town learned about the game during the first week of November when a Texas Hold 'em ad appeared on a Highway One marquee in Dewey. Town commissioners Continued on page 3 IINSIDE: 5O "The Price of Liberty Eternal Vigilance" Delaware's Cape Region Tuesday, November 16 - Thursday, November 18, 2004 www.capegazette.com Volume 12 No. 49 Canalfront Park in Lewes takes flight Donors honored, permits on the way By Hen J. Evans Jr. Excitement about the Lewes Canalfront Park was. palpable as Lewes Mayor Jim Ford on Sunday unveiled the burnished steel and Plexiglas plaque bearing the names of more than 500 people who have given money for the project. "This is just absolutely wonderful. This is what Lewes is all about," Ford said as the applause of more than 70 people filled the room. The gleaming plaque is on the wall of a building used as a net-repair house in the days when the menhaden fishing indus- try was dominant in Lewes. Sunday's event was also the kick-off of the campaign to raise $3.2 million to build the park along the banks of the Lewes- Rehoboth Canal just north of the canal bridge. The total cost of the project is $4.9 million; $1.7 "of that has already been raised. It was both a celebration of the acquisi- tion of property for the park and a thank- you to those who have given money for the project. "It's been nearly three years to the day- Sunday, November 11, 2001- that owner- ship of the Lewes Boatyard was transferred to the City of Lewes. Since that time a lot has taken place, much of it behind the scenes and out of the public's eye," Ford said. He said the numerous meetings with city residents to get their ideas and more meet- ings with state and federal agencies, to get their permission, are now behind them. "We're still in the later stages of Continued on page 8 Fantastic f'mish for Joey Davidson, left, and Brad Fawcett, studentsat the University of Delaware, check the sold out sign for any Steven Billups photo movies they planned to see during the Rehoboth Beach Film Festival held over the weekend. Film Fest By Karl Chalabala The audience at "the Rehoboth Beach Independent Film closing party Nov. 14 cheered wildly as founder Rob Rector announced the final tally of moviegoers. Over the five days of the festival, 19,273 people watched more than 81 films, fea- tures, documentaries and shorts, a 15 per- cent increase over last year's attendance of 16,800. Rector said the festival could only accommodate, at maximum, 22,660 peo- ple. The number of sold-out viewings was evidence of the rise in festival attendees. Last year, 32 films were sold-out. This year the number nearly doubled to 52 sold- out viewings. "We are almost at max capacity," Rector said after revealing the numbers. Rehoboth Beach Film Society program 7 ming director David Gold, in his first year Continued on page U Dewey Beach officials table action on gambling Council debates merits of charitable wagering By Jim Cresson The Dewey Beach commissioners are considering whether to amend town laws on charitable gambling, but after extensive ] debate Nov. 13, the issue was tabled until Dec. 11. "We don't need gambling for a charity event," said Commissioner Ellie Mayhew. "Many local charitable organizations use silent auctions and 50-50 raffles. That's fine with me." The issue arose after Highway One LLP advertised a Texas Hold 'em card game to benefit a Salisbury, Md.-based Marine Corps League's annual Toys for Tots cam- paign. The card game was to be held Nov. 13, if a charitable gambling license were obtained from the state Charitable Gaming Commission. Game participants were to be charged a $100 entrance fee to compete in the game at the BayCenter. The winner was to get a trip for two worth $2,000 to Las Vegas. Tickets for the game were advertised as bg.ing available by calling or visiting the Rusty Rudder. The town learned about the game during the first week of November when a Texas Hold 'em ad appeared on a Highway One marquee in Dewey. Town commissioners Continued on page 3