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November 16, 2004     Cape Gazette
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Delaware Cape Region History In Photographs Continued from page 6 others, what Dave didn't mention was that he was named football MVP and basketball MVP in the Philly Catholic League in his sen- ior year. Attaining one MVP in a league that big is a huge accom- plishment. Attaining two MVPs in two tough sports in the same year is an incredible feat. It is a mark of the true greatness of this man that I have never seen him mention these facts in print or hardly at all yet, on the other hand, he always encourages oth- ers both as a teacher, coach, and journalist. Dave was also a su- perb ocean lifeguard with the RBP (his son, Dave, also was a great RBP guard) and has been very supportive of those engaged in the noble profession of ocean lifesaving. A lot of people owe him a debt of gratitude for his many years of firstclass public service and I am the first to ac- knowledge this. Go on, now. Git! Dr. Peter I. Hartsock National Board Member U.S. Lifesaving Association Captain, U.S. Public Health Service Co-Director Delaware United Open Water Lifesaving Program Everyone. invited to celebrate caregivers Yearly, November is designated as National Family Caregivers Month. It is a one-month, 30 days that have been set aside to honor, thank and give recognition to those selfless people who squeeze the time to care for a loved one or friend in need into already very busy schedules. You know who you are. Maybe your caregiving began as visiting once a week tO just "check in on" mom or dad or Aunt M or neigh- bor Ted. Maybe it progressed to cooking the week's meals to be sure they were receiving some quality nour- ishment or driving to the never- ending stream of doctors' appoint- ments. Just when it was that they moved into your home or you theirs, may now have become a blur, and really not too important. Oh, but to be sure, when the care giving began to include bathing, dressing and maybe incontinence care as well, is etched into your memory. The sleepless nights, or missed days at work or staying in instead of going out, have been accepted as part of providing lov- ing care. As the manager, care coordina- tors and caregivers of the Sussex County office of Griswold Special Care, we krtow many of you and we know first hand the sacrifices you make each and every day. We are honored to be of assistance to you and your loved ones by being your eyes, ears and hands when you need to be at work, away for much needed respite and just un- able to provide hands-on care. We want you to know one month - 30 days - is not enough time to thanlyou for all you do. Please know we honor, respect and salute you. CAPE GAZETTE, Tuesday, Nov. 16 - Nov. 18, 2004 - 7 Delaware State Archives photo For years, the YWCA occupied Rehoboth's most prominent corner In 1905, the Baltimore chapter of the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) pur- chased a private residence, built at the corner of Rehoboth Avenue and Boardwalk, for a summer retreat. The handsome building served that purpose for many years, in keeping with the Christian camp meeting origins of Rehoboth Beach. The site is now home to another Re- hoboth Beach landmark - Dolle's. Happy National Caregivers Month. You are cordially invited to join .us in our open house celebration from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 18, at 109 Market Street in Lewes. Cheryl Jankowski manager staff and caregivers Griswold Special Care Lewes This election to about who won We are supposed to live in a democracy. Do we really? Last Tuesday I watched as states were called for one candidate or the other without the votes even be- ing counted. This is not about who won, but about the rights of the people who went out and vote. Protect our right to vote and make them count all votes. Tya Pope Milford Message to coaltion To the Coalition for Tolerance and Justice; I offer this great quote from G.K. Chesterton: "Tolerance is the virtue of a man without convictions." Jason Stickler Lewes We can protect Dq00taware's desirability together M. Jane Brady Attorney General I ' recently filed a lawsuit chal- lenging changes to the regulations of the Clean Air Act proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency. It is the second such law- suit I have filed within the last 12 months. These new rules establish when power plants, refineries and other manufacturing plants would' be required to implement new and better pollution control technolo- gy, and under what circumstances they can average those emissions throughout the entire facility. The regulations are intended to imple- merit the Clean Air Act, which re- quires Delaware to reduce specific pollution emissions. Delaware is currently not in compliance with all of our obligations under that Act. Issues relating to these matters are complex, and there are differ- ences of opinion among environ- mentalists about whether these changes will help reduce pollution levels or will increase them by al- lowing industry to avoid making improvements to their pollution controls that will help bring levels down. It is my position that any regulation that would allow even one more particle of pollution to COMMENTARY M. Jane Brady enter the air in Delaware, needs to be challenged. At the heart of much of the dis- cussion is whether the new rules will give DelAware, and other states, the flexibility to manage their air quality. I believe it is im- portant for us to retain that flexi- bility. Wein Delaware know far better than someone in Washing- ton, DC what will best improve our air quality. We also know best how to achieve compliance with the reductions in pollution re- quired by the Clean Air Act itself. I have met with those who sup- port the .changes and those who oppose them, including represen- tatives of the Delaware Depart- ment of Natural Resources, the federal Environmental Protection Agency, the-Counsel on Enviroa- mental Quality, various environ- mental advocacy groups and some of the affected businesses as well. In addition, atthe kind invitation of Sen. David McBride, I attended and participated in an inquiry by a committee comprised of members of various state legislatures through the Council on State Gov- ernments into the impact on the states of the first of these regula- tions. There is little consensus about the impact of the rules on Delaware, and I have had to sort through much rhetoric to try to figure out what the real conse- quences will be. I have not yet re- solved that issue, but in order to keep all of Delaware's options available to us, I have filed these legal challenges to the regula- tions. Not surprisingly, there is little consensus among the Attor- neys General of the various states, either. Some have filed in support of the new regulations, while I, and about 13 others have filed challenging them. As my counterparts in some of the other states have noted, this litigation is likely to take a long time and be expensive. It is not certain that the lawsuit will be successful. We are working to- gether with the other states that . have sued to share the work and research to meet those challenges. However, for those very reasons, I intend to continue to meet with the agencies I referenced previ- ously, to try and fashion language that assures Delaware retains the flexibility to require improve- ments and installation of technol- ogy we believe is necessary to protect our air quality. These rules, however, affect on- ly a very small part of the options available to Delaware to come in- to compliance with the Clean Air Act. There are options available to Delaware that we should fur- ther explore. First and foremost, we should address the currently approved levels of polluting. Delaware has the authority, and the ability, to further reduce pollu- tion, regardless of these new rules. We should undertake a review of all permitted levels of discharge and emissions, and determine if there should be changes to those approvals. This is true, whether in Claymont, Delaware City or Indi- an River. By doing all that we can within Delaware's authority, and by taking responsibility ourselves to stringently regulate the emis- sion of pollution in Delaware, we may be able to document if the new rules are, indeed, affecting our ability to come into compli- ance with the Clean Air Act. The courts are unlikely to require us to follow regulations that put us in direct conflict with our mandate to reduce pollution under that Act. Keeping the environment clean in Delaware, whether air or water, is a challenging matter. Our water and air do not originate here, an.d other states and their industries have an impact on us. In addition to addressing the rules, regula- tions and permits right here in Delaware, we should be meeting with those other states that emit pollution that affects Delaware's citizens, and making it clear we will do what it takes to protect the water and air that enters our bor- ders. I am having just such discus- sions with other Attorneys Gener- al. Others in government should do the same with their counter- parts in other states. Together, we can make sure Delaware's air is clear, our water is clean, and our state is a desirable place to live. Delaware Cape Region History In Photographs Continued from page 6 others, what Dave didn't mention was that he was named football MVP and basketball MVP in the Philly Catholic League in his sen- ior year. Attaining one MVP in a league that big is a huge accom- plishment. Attaining two MVPs in two tough sports in the same year is an incredible feat. It is a mark of the true greatness of this man that I have never seen him mention these facts in print or hardly at all yet, on the other hand, he always encourages oth- ers both as a teacher, coach, and journalist. Dave was also a su- perb ocean lifeguard with the RBP (his son, Dave, also was a great RBP guard) and has been very supportive of those engaged in the noble profession of ocean lifesaving. A lot of people owe him a debt of gratitude for his many years of firstclass public service and I am the first to ac- knowledge this. Go on, now. Git! Dr. Peter I. Hartsock National Board Member U.S. Lifesaving Association Captain, U.S. Public Health Service Co-Director Delaware United Open Water Lifesaving Program Everyone. invited to celebrate caregivers Yearly, November is designated as National Family Caregivers Month. It is a one-month, 30 days that have been set aside to honor, thank and give recognition to those selfless people who squeeze the time to care for a loved one or friend in need into already very busy schedules. You know who you are. Maybe your caregiving began as visiting once a week tO just "check in on" mom or dad or Aunt M or neigh- bor Ted. Maybe it progressed to cooking the week's meals to be sure they were receiving some quality nour- ishment or driving to the never- ending stream of doctors' appoint- ments. Just when it was that they moved into your home or you theirs, may now have become a blur, and really not too important. Oh, but to be sure, when the care giving began to include bathing, dressing and maybe incontinence care as well, is etched into your memory. The sleepless nights, or missed days at work or staying in instead of going out, have been accepted as part of providing lov- ing care. As the manager, care coordina- tors and caregivers of the Sussex County office of Griswold Special Care, we krtow many of you and we know first hand the sacrifices you make each and every day. We are honored to be of assistance to you and your loved ones by being your eyes, ears and hands when you need to be at work, away for much needed respite and just un- able to provide hands-on care. We want you to know one month - 30 days - is not enough time to thanlyou for all you do. Please know we honor, respect and salute you. CAPE GAZETTE, Tuesday, Nov. 16 - Nov. 18, 2004 - 7 Delaware State Archives photo For years, the YWCA occupied Rehoboth's most prominent corner In 1905, the Baltimore chapter of the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) pur- chased a private residence, built at the corner of Rehoboth Avenue and Boardwalk, for a summer retreat. The handsome building served that purpose for many years, in keeping with the Christian camp meeting origins of Rehoboth Beach. The site is now home to another Re- hoboth Beach landmark - Dolle's. Happy National Caregivers Month. You are cordially invited to join .us in our open house celebration from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 18, at 109 Market Street in Lewes. Cheryl Jankowski manager staff and caregivers Griswold Special Care Lewes This election to about who won We are supposed to live in a democracy. Do we really? Last Tuesday I watched as states were called for one candidate or the other without the votes even be- ing counted. This is not about who won, but about the rights of the people who went out and vote. Protect our right to vote and make them count all votes. Tya Pope Milford Message to coaltion To the Coalition for Tolerance and Justice; I offer this great quote from G.K. Chesterton: "Tolerance is the virtue of a man without convictions." Jason Stickler Lewes We can protect Dq00taware's desirability together M. Jane Brady Attorney General I ' recently filed a lawsuit chal- lenging changes to the regulations of the Clean Air Act proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency. It is the second such law- suit I have filed within the last 12 months. These new rules establish when power plants, refineries and other manufacturing plants would' be required to implement new and better pollution control technolo- gy, and under what circumstances they can average those emissions throughout the entire facility. The regulations are intended to imple- merit the Clean Air Act, which re- quires Delaware to reduce specific pollution emissions. Delaware is currently not in compliance with all of our obligations under that Act. Issues relating to these matters are complex, and there are differ- ences of opinion among environ- mentalists about whether these changes will help reduce pollution levels or will increase them by al- lowing industry to avoid making improvements to their pollution controls that will help bring levels down. It is my position that any regulation that would allow even one more particle of pollution to COMMENTARY M. Jane Brady enter the air in Delaware, needs to be challenged. At the heart of much of the dis- cussion is whether the new rules will give DelAware, and other states, the flexibility to manage their air quality. I believe it is im- portant for us to retain that flexi- bility. Wein Delaware know far better than someone in Washing- ton, DC what will best improve our air quality. We also know best how to achieve compliance with the reductions in pollution re- quired by the Clean Air Act itself. I have met with those who sup- port the .changes and those who oppose them, including represen- tatives of the Delaware Depart- ment of Natural Resources, the federal Environmental Protection Agency, the-Counsel on Enviroa- mental Quality, various environ- mental advocacy groups and some of the affected businesses as well. In addition, atthe kind invitation of Sen. David McBride, I attended and participated in an inquiry by a committee comprised of members of various state legislatures through the Council on State Gov- ernments into the impact on the states of the first of these regula- tions. There is little consensus about the impact of the rules on Delaware, and I have had to sort through much rhetoric to try to figure out what the real conse- quences will be. I have not yet re- solved that issue, but in order to keep all of Delaware's options available to us, I have filed these legal challenges to the regula- tions. Not surprisingly, there is little consensus among the Attor- neys General of the various states, either. Some have filed in support of the new regulations, while I, and about 13 others have filed challenging them. As my counterparts in some of the other states have noted, this litigation is likely to take a long time and be expensive. It is not certain that the lawsuit will be successful. We are working to- gether with the other states that . have sued to share the work and research to meet those challenges. However, for those very reasons, I intend to continue to meet with the agencies I referenced previ- ously, to try and fashion language that assures Delaware retains the flexibility to require improve- ments and installation of technol- ogy we believe is necessary to protect our air quality. These rules, however, affect on- ly a very small part of the options available to Delaware to come in- to compliance with the Clean Air Act. There are options available to Delaware that we should fur- ther explore. First and foremost, we should address the currently approved levels of polluting. Delaware has the authority, and the ability, to further reduce pollu- tion, regardless of these new rules. We should undertake a review of all permitted levels of discharge and emissions, and determine if there should be changes to those approvals. This is true, whether in Claymont, Delaware City or Indi- an River. By doing all that we can within Delaware's authority, and by taking responsibility ourselves to stringently regulate the emis- sion of pollution in Delaware, we may be able to document if the new rules are, indeed, affecting our ability to come into compli- ance with the Clean Air Act. The courts are unlikely to require us to follow regulations that put us in direct conflict with our mandate to reduce pollution under that Act. Keeping the environment clean in Delaware, whether air or water, is a challenging matter. Our water and air do not originate here, an.d other states and their industries have an impact on us. In addition to addressing the rules, regula- tions and permits right here in Delaware, we should be meeting with those other states that emit pollution that affects Delaware's citizens, and making it clear we will do what it takes to protect the water and air that enters our bor- ders. I am having just such discus- sions with other Attorneys Gener- al. Others in government should do the same with their counter- parts in other states. Together, we can make sure Delaware's air is clear, our water is clean, and our state is a desirable place to live.