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November 19, 2004     Cape Gazette
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November 19, 2004
 

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[INSIDE: 50 ] "'The Price of Liberty is Eternal Vigilance" Delaware's Cape Region Friday, November 19 - Monday, November 22, 2004 www.capegazette.com Volume 12 No. 50 I Best resort entrance most extensive DelDOT eyes relief for Rehoboth congestion By Karl Chalabala State transportation officials say the best way to alleviate traffic congestion at the entrance to Rehoboth Beach is to build a new bypass road. Officials have proposed a new road, with 10-foot bicycle paths, that would lie east of "Route l, starting near the entrance of Rehoboth and extending north to the Kmart intersection. Department of Transportation (DelDOT) officials unveiled the new road to Rehoboth Beach Entrance Improvement Committee members on Nov. 17, their first meeting after a five-month hiatus that DelDOT needed to complete their opera- tional studies based on the committee's previous recommendations. The new road, known as alternative 5, gained the committee and the public's approval after public workshops last sum- mer. DelDOT engineers refined the pro- posed road's alignment so it impacts the fewest property owners. Still the road affects more properties than any other alternatives officials have consid- ered. But, according to key traffic analysis conclusions from the study, it "provides relief to the greatest portion of the study area and diverts the highest percentage of traffic entering and exiting Rehoboth Beach. It distributes traffic to three loca- tions on Route, thereby providing the most travel options for motorists." Continued on page 24 Disney CEO castigates Michael Ovitz Sporting a smile and a distinctive mouse-ear tie, Walt Disney Co. CEO Michael Eisner, left, walked casually into Chancery Court, Nov. 17, with his attorney, Gary Naftalis, by his side. Eisner was beginning his third day of testi- Jim Cresson photo mony in the Disney Co. shareholders' $200 million law- suit against him, former company President Michael Ovitz and several former and current company board members. Eisner tells court about betrayal, untruthfulness By Jim Cresson Walt Disney Co. CEO Michael Eisner walked casually around the Circle in Georgetown, Nov. 17, on his way into Court of Chancery. Under a bright sunny sky and with attor- ney Gary Naftalis by his side, Eisner smiled and chatted for a moment with reporters before entering court. When a reporter commented to Eisner that it was a beautiful day, the man in charge of operations for the Burbank, Calif.-based Walt Disney Co. responded with the authority of one accustomed to making profound pronouncements. "It is the third consecutive beautiful day here," he said and entered court. Eisner and all people involved in the Court of Chancery case undergo a security Continued on page 16 Cape's Brandenberger announces retirement Tells school board it's in district's best interest By Maggie Beetz Cape Henlopen School District Superintendent Andy Brandenberger has announced his retirement effective April 1, 2005, after 32 years of service in public schools. In a letter to school board President Allan Redden, Brandenberger wrote, "with a new planning process starting for the renova- tions or modernization of the high school, it would be in the district's best interest to find leadership that could see that process through from start to finish." Reflecting on what has changed in edu- cation during his 32 years, Brandenberger said, "There are so many more issues, con- cerns and services that school boards are expected to deliver." He said these issues "divert us away .from our primary goal, which is to provide education "Public education is the most regulated enterprise in American society, and very often those regulations have cross purpos- es," he said. Discussing the controversial No Child Left Behind Act, Brandenberger said, "Accountability is a good thing. Defined expectations are a good thing." At the same time, he said, right now educators are being "overcorrected" and it is grab- bing people's attention. He said he expect- Continued on page 21 .... ,+ .+::,:,+ .. ,++ :,o...,.+..-.++f.+. -,,.i :, ........ :,:+ ..........  + --- [INSIDE: 50 ] "'The Price of Liberty is Eternal Vigilance" Delaware's Cape Region Friday, November 19 - Monday, November 22, 2004 www.capegazette.com Volume 12 No. 50 I Best resort entrance most extensive DelDOT eyes relief for Rehoboth congestion By Karl Chalabala State transportation officials say the best way to alleviate traffic congestion at the entrance to Rehoboth Beach is to build a new bypass road. Officials have proposed a new road, with 10-foot bicycle paths, that would lie east of "Route l, starting near the entrance of Rehoboth and extending north to the Kmart intersection. Department of Transportation (DelDOT) officials unveiled the new road to Rehoboth Beach Entrance Improvement Committee members on Nov. 17, their first meeting after a five-month hiatus that DelDOT needed to complete their opera- tional studies based on the committee's previous recommendations. The new road, known as alternative 5, gained the committee and the public's approval after public workshops last sum- mer. DelDOT engineers refined the pro- posed road's alignment so it impacts the fewest property owners. Still the road affects more properties than any other alternatives officials have consid- ered. But, according to key traffic analysis conclusions from the study, it "provides relief to the greatest portion of the study area and diverts the highest percentage of traffic entering and exiting Rehoboth Beach. It distributes traffic to three loca- tions on Route, thereby providing the most travel options for motorists." Continued on page 24 Disney CEO castigates Michael Ovitz Sporting a smile and a distinctive mouse-ear tie, Walt Disney Co. CEO Michael Eisner, left, walked casually into Chancery Court, Nov. 17, with his attorney, Gary Naftalis, by his side. Eisner was beginning his third day of testi- Jim Cresson photo mony in the Disney Co. shareholders' $200 million law- suit against him, former company President Michael Ovitz and several former and current company board members. Eisner tells court about betrayal, untruthfulness By Jim Cresson Walt Disney Co. CEO Michael Eisner walked casually around the Circle in Georgetown, Nov. 17, on his way into Court of Chancery. Under a bright sunny sky and with attor- ney Gary Naftalis by his side, Eisner smiled and chatted for a moment with reporters before entering court. When a reporter commented to Eisner that it was a beautiful day, the man in charge of operations for the Burbank, Calif.-based Walt Disney Co. responded with the authority of one accustomed to making profound pronouncements. "It is the third consecutive beautiful day here," he said and entered court. Eisner and all people involved in the Court of Chancery case undergo a security Continued on page 16 Cape's Brandenberger announces retirement Tells school board it's in district's best interest By Maggie Beetz Cape Henlopen School District Superintendent Andy Brandenberger has announced his retirement effective April 1, 2005, after 32 years of service in public schools. In a letter to school board President Allan Redden, Brandenberger wrote, "with a new planning process starting for the renova- tions or modernization of the high school, it would be in the district's best interest to find leadership that could see that process through from start to finish." Reflecting on what has changed in edu- cation during his 32 years, Brandenberger said, "There are so many more issues, con- cerns and services that school boards are expected to deliver." He said these issues "divert us away .from our primary goal, which is to provide education "Public education is the most regulated enterprise in American society, and very often those regulations have cross purpos- es," he said. Discussing the controversial No Child Left Behind Act, Brandenberger said, "Accountability is a good thing. Defined expectations are a good thing." At the same time, he said, right now educators are being "overcorrected" and it is grab- bing people's attention. He said he expect- Continued on page 21 .... ,+ .+::,:,+ .. ,++ :,o...,.+..-.++f.+. -,,.i :, ........ :,:+ ..........  + ---