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Lewes, Delaware
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November 19, 2004     Cape Gazette
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November 19, 2004
 

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CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, Nov. 19 - Nov..22, 2004 - 3 Cape Gazette sets Thanksgiving deadlines Offices of the Cape Gazette at 17585 Nassau Commons Boule- vard will be closed Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 25, and the day after, Friday, Nov. 26, for the holidays. Retail advertising deadline for the Friday, Nov. 26, weekend edi- tion is Monday, Nov. 22, at noon. News and classified deadline for that edition is Tuesday, Nov. 23, at noon. News, classified and retail advertising deadline for the Tues- day, Nov. 30, midweek edition is 4 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 24. Nor- mal deadlines will resume in the following week. We wish every- one a happy and safe Thanksgiv- ing holiday. Lewes city offices closed for holiday City of Lewes offices will be Federal law requires that the in- terest cost of the bonds not exceed 6, percent per year. The bonds have a final maturity date of not later than Dec. 1, 2034. Town manager reports on Dewey finances Dewey Beach Town Manager Gordon Elliott reported in public meeting, Nov. 13, that as of Sept. 30, the town had a balance of $1,808,614.58 in its general checking account, $1,877,824.42 invested in U.S. Treasury Bills dedicated to beach replenishment and $98,264 in a transfer tax ac- count with Citizens Bank. Elliott also reported that the town had $4,690.49'in a Forest Grant account, $78,208.92 in a Municipal Street Aid account, $436.72 in a police savings ac- count, $1,000 in a police pension plan and $585.34 in a police SALLE Grant account. Elliott said the town's cash available for general disburse- ments, beach replenishment, cash losed Thursday, Nov. 25, and Kestricted to grants and cash re- Dewey gives big bars chance to quiet down Dewey commissioners decided to give the big bars and restau- rants in town a chance this winter to make effective noise abatement changes or face a code mandating that outside speakers be shut off at 11 p.m. during weekdays and midnight during weekends and holidays. That came after Commissioner Courtney Riordan did not gain a second on his motion to shut out- side speakers down at 11 p.m. Mayor Pat Wright noted that Highway One LLP, which owns several big restdhrants and the Bottle & Cork bar, has submitted plans to add a sound-buffering re- tractable wall behind the Rusty Rudder and a retractable roof over an open area of the bottle & Cork. Wright said she is willing to wait until that work is finished next spring before deciding on a code. Commissioners Ellie Mayhew, Alice Walsh and Dale Cooke said they are willing to wait until spring. "We'll hear about it if the buffers don't work," Mayhew Dennis Forney photo Helping out at Cape State Park Members of the friends of Cape Henlopen State Park gath- ered for q trails work day and bird seed,and books fundrais- er on Saturday, Nov. 6. Among the activities for the day was clean-up of this natural water feature in front of the Seaside Nature Center. Among those volunteering their efforts for the day were (l-r) Terry Willis, Karen Willis, Bob Gallagher, June GaUagher, Dick Thatcher, Josh Willis and Christine Besche. I + ty administrative office building service grants. That money is Friday, Nov. 26, for the Thanks- stricted to special projects totaled giving holiday. City offices will ?$3,872,740-68 as of t. 30. said. ........ 24 hours a day, but officiats hope slatO for nonprofit grouPs., public reopen at 9 a.m. Nov. 29[  " ' Town CPA Angel6 M. Caputo Town attorney Rob Witsil noted ' the.thousands of Sussex resent s ,,and private schools and civic and prepared the treasury report, that the town once had a code bar- :expected to participate in the an- social organizations. Dock demolition topic of Lewes special meeting Bids for demolition of the old dock at the Lewes Canalfront Park will be considered at a spe- cial meeting of the Lewes Mayor and City Council 6:30 p.m., Nov. 22, at City Hall. Dock demolition is among the projects scheduled to begin this winter in the first phase of the Canalfront Park construc- tion. Lewes architectural review panel to meet The Lewes Commercial Archi- tectural Review Commission will consider revised plans for An- gler's Marina Bait & Tackle Shop 7 p.m.,Nov. 23, at City Hall. An- gler's owner, James Walsh and Kurt Hensey of BuildingQuote,com, will presefit the proposal. Lewes approves $39.5 million in bonds The City of Lewes has moved ahead on the issuance of $39.5 million in general obligation bonds to pay for a variety' of capi- tal improvement projects. The council voted unanimously to approve issuing the bond at a Nov. 17 special meeting. The resolution, required by city charter, gives attorneys the go ahead to complete paperwork re- quired to issue bonds. About $12 million of the bond money will be used to build the city's proposed new wastewater treatment plant. Other projects to be funded are electric system and electric plant improvements, street improvements and mainte- nance and improvements to city buildings and parks. Lewes voters gave their ap- proval to issue the bond in special elections held in April. Dewey council accepts Highway One request Dewey Beach commissioners accepted a Highway One LLP re- quest, Nov. 13, to make perma- nent a conditional use zoning for Sunny Side Up restaurant at Rud- dertowne. The restaurant was given a one- year conditional use zoning clas- sification in October 2002. That classification was supposed to have been extended or made per- manent in 2003, but Highway One forgot to make application to that effect, and the town council forgot the matter altogether. ,Highway One attorney Stephen Spenc admitted his client's over- sight in attending to the condition- al-use zoning issue and a certifi- cate of compliance. Spence said the restaurant of- fers nothing but seated dining and it has no bar area. Responding to a question from Commissioner El- lie Mayhew, Spence said the seat- ing has increased from 122 to 130, because of the addition of an eight-seat table. Council took no action on the zoning issue after Commissioner Courtney Riordan noted that Sun- ny Side Up has been operating un- der an umbrella business license for all businesses in Rudder- towne. He suggested a separate business license should be re- quired for the restaurant and per- haps all the Highway One busi- nesses in Ruddertowne. Com- missioner Dale Cooke agreed, and town attorney Rob Witsil said Highway One is entitled to license Sunny Side Up as a separate busi- ness. By council consensus, the Sun- 0y Side Up zoning application was accepted with the prior condi- tion that alcohol consumption should be done only by customers seated at tables. ring outdoor speakers, but that was deleted by amendment in fa- vor of checking noise levels with a decibel meter. The vote to table the matter un- til April was approved 4-1 with Riordan opposing. Dewey tables five agenda items Dewey Beach commissioners held six agenda items over until next month. Commissioners discussed but did not vote on a draft ordinance for voter registration, a proposed ordinance to amend the definition of patron area, an ordinance to amend parking requirements for businesses, a discussion on setting a time limit for construction on approved site plans, a discussion of business fees in town. Sussex offices dosed for Thanksgiving Sussex County government of- rices will be closed Thursday, Nov. 25, and Friday, Nov. 26, to allow employees to observe tho Thanksgiving holiday. The coun- ty council will not meet on Tues- day, Nov. 23. The next regular council meeting is at 10 a.m., Tuesday, Nov. 30, in the county council chambers in Georgetown. Caroling on The Circle slated Dec. 6 Caroling on The Circle will take place at 6:30 p.m., Monday, Dec. 6, in front of the county adminis- trative office building on The Cir- cle in Georgetown. In the event of rain, the program will be held at the Georgetown Fire Hall. County Administrator Bob Stickels said the goal of Caroling on the Circle is to-raise nonperish- able food items to distribute to food banks in Sussex County. Items can be brought to the coun- nual festivities will bring food items with them for county pantries. Anyone needing assistance in transporting food may call 855- 7840. "Caroling on the Circle is an ex- cellent opportunity for Sussex countians to help Sussex coun- tians by stocking food pantries throughout the county," Stickels said. Following the event, a reception will be held at the Georgetown Fire Hall. Council donation questioned Sussex County Council on Nov. 16 donated $1,000 to the Delmar- va Christian High School for gymnasium equipment. Each of the councilmen gave $200 from councilmatic funds, available for projects in each of the council's five districts. However, frequent council crit- ic Dan Kramer, with his often re- peated refrain, calling the council- men" a bunch of turkeys," said at the end of the council meeting that the donation was wrong be- cause of the religious affiliation of the school. "It's a school based on reli- gion," Kramer said. "Why are you giving them money? They should raise it themselves." Kramer also argued Council- man Vance Phillips should have recused himself from the vote be- cause his daughter attends the school. The council disagreed with Kramer, as they routinely grant thousands of dollars each year to schools throughout the county for various needs. "I know we gave about $24,000 to Sussex Central School District last year," Phillips said. For this year, $400,000 is in the council's budget for community Council President Dale Dukes argued the grant served residents throughout the county. "The school has open enroll- ment to all Sussex countians," Dukes said. "There is community benefit." County attorney Jim Griffin Said he did not see a problem with the donation because council poli- cy allows any organization in the county, rgardless of religious af- filiation, to apply for assistance. After a short discussion, the councilmen agreed with Dukes, and they unanimously approved the grant. DPH receives another shipment of flu vaccines The Department of Public Health (DPH) received an addi- tional shipment of 12,000 doses of influenza vaccine Nov. 17. The shipment is part of an ongoing na- tional plan to allocate 22.4 million doses after half of the nation's ex- pected 2004-2005 flu vaccine supply became unavailable. Local providers and businesses have al- so given DPH 1,000 doses. DPH will operate its call center Nov. 22-23 to schedule appointments for a flu shot clinic to be conduct- ed Nov. 30. Residents should not call for appointments prior to these dates. To help DPH allocate these dos- es and anticipated shipments, DPH convened a Vaccine Alloca- tion Advisory Group. Hospitals, physicians, infectious disease spe- cialists, state legislators, and long- term care facilities are represented on this group. Based on their advice, DPH has designated 8,364 doses of the shipment for the Nov. 30 clinic for high-risk adults. Another 1,500 doses will be reserved for high- risk children older than 6 months Continued on page 4 CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, Nov. 19 - Nov..22, 2004 - 3 Cape Gazette sets Thanksgiving deadlines Offices of the Cape Gazette at 17585 Nassau Commons Boule- vard will be closed Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 25, and the day after, Friday, Nov. 26, for the holidays. Retail advertising deadline for the Friday, Nov. 26, weekend edi- tion is Monday, Nov. 22, at noon. News and classified deadline for that edition is Tuesday, Nov. 23, at noon. News, classified and retail advertising deadline for the Tues- day, Nov. 30, midweek edition is 4 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 24. Nor- mal deadlines will resume in the following week. We wish every- one a happy and safe Thanksgiv- ing holiday. Lewes city offices closed for holiday City of Lewes offices will be Federal law requires that the in- terest cost of the bonds not exceed 6, percent per year. The bonds have a final maturity date of not later than Dec. 1, 2034. Town manager reports on Dewey finances Dewey Beach Town Manager Gordon Elliott reported in public meeting, Nov. 13, that as of Sept. 30, the town had a balance of $1,808,614.58 in its general checking account, $1,877,824.42 invested in U.S. Treasury Bills dedicated to beach replenishment and $98,264 in a transfer tax ac- count with Citizens Bank. Elliott also reported that the town had $4,690.49'in a Forest Grant account, $78,208.92 in a Municipal Street Aid account, $436.72 in a police savings ac- count, $1,000 in a police pension plan and $585.34 in a police SALLE Grant account. Elliott said the town's cash available for general disburse- ments, beach replenishment, cash losed Thursday, Nov. 25, and Kestricted to grants and cash re- Dewey gives big bars chance to quiet down Dewey commissioners decided to give the big bars and restau- rants in town a chance this winter to make effective noise abatement changes or face a code mandating that outside speakers be shut off at 11 p.m. during weekdays and midnight during weekends and holidays. That came after Commissioner Courtney Riordan did not gain a second on his motion to shut out- side speakers down at 11 p.m. Mayor Pat Wright noted that Highway One LLP, which owns several big restdhrants and the Bottle & Cork bar, has submitted plans to add a sound-buffering re- tractable wall behind the Rusty Rudder and a retractable roof over an open area of the bottle & Cork. Wright said she is willing to wait until that work is finished next spring before deciding on a code. Commissioners Ellie Mayhew, Alice Walsh and Dale Cooke said they are willing to wait until spring. "We'll hear about it if the buffers don't work," Mayhew Dennis Forney photo Helping out at Cape State Park Members of the friends of Cape Henlopen State Park gath- ered for q trails work day and bird seed,and books fundrais- er on Saturday, Nov. 6. Among the activities for the day was clean-up of this natural water feature in front of the Seaside Nature Center. Among those volunteering their efforts for the day were (l-r) Terry Willis, Karen Willis, Bob Gallagher, June GaUagher, Dick Thatcher, Josh Willis and Christine Besche. I + ty administrative office building service grants. That money is Friday, Nov. 26, for the Thanks- stricted to special projects totaled giving holiday. City offices will ?$3,872,740-68 as of t. 30. said. ........ 24 hours a day, but officiats hope slatO for nonprofit grouPs., public reopen at 9 a.m. Nov. 29[  " ' Town CPA Angel6 M. Caputo Town attorney Rob Witsil noted ' the.thousands of Sussex resent s ,,and private schools and civic and prepared the treasury report, that the town once had a code bar- :expected to participate in the an- social organizations. Dock demolition topic of Lewes special meeting Bids for demolition of the old dock at the Lewes Canalfront Park will be considered at a spe- cial meeting of the Lewes Mayor and City Council 6:30 p.m., Nov. 22, at City Hall. Dock demolition is among the projects scheduled to begin this winter in the first phase of the Canalfront Park construc- tion. Lewes architectural review panel to meet The Lewes Commercial Archi- tectural Review Commission will consider revised plans for An- gler's Marina Bait & Tackle Shop 7 p.m.,Nov. 23, at City Hall. An- gler's owner, James Walsh and Kurt Hensey of BuildingQuote,com, will presefit the proposal. Lewes approves $39.5 million in bonds The City of Lewes has moved ahead on the issuance of $39.5 million in general obligation bonds to pay for a variety' of capi- tal improvement projects. The council voted unanimously to approve issuing the bond at a Nov. 17 special meeting. The resolution, required by city charter, gives attorneys the go ahead to complete paperwork re- quired to issue bonds. About $12 million of the bond money will be used to build the city's proposed new wastewater treatment plant. Other projects to be funded are electric system and electric plant improvements, street improvements and mainte- nance and improvements to city buildings and parks. Lewes voters gave their ap- proval to issue the bond in special elections held in April. Dewey council accepts Highway One request Dewey Beach commissioners accepted a Highway One LLP re- quest, Nov. 13, to make perma- nent a conditional use zoning for Sunny Side Up restaurant at Rud- dertowne. The restaurant was given a one- year conditional use zoning clas- sification in October 2002. That classification was supposed to have been extended or made per- manent in 2003, but Highway One forgot to make application to that effect, and the town council forgot the matter altogether. ,Highway One attorney Stephen Spenc admitted his client's over- sight in attending to the condition- al-use zoning issue and a certifi- cate of compliance. Spence said the restaurant of- fers nothing but seated dining and it has no bar area. Responding to a question from Commissioner El- lie Mayhew, Spence said the seat- ing has increased from 122 to 130, because of the addition of an eight-seat table. Council took no action on the zoning issue after Commissioner Courtney Riordan noted that Sun- ny Side Up has been operating un- der an umbrella business license for all businesses in Rudder- towne. He suggested a separate business license should be re- quired for the restaurant and per- haps all the Highway One busi- nesses in Ruddertowne. Com- missioner Dale Cooke agreed, and town attorney Rob Witsil said Highway One is entitled to license Sunny Side Up as a separate busi- ness. By council consensus, the Sun- 0y Side Up zoning application was accepted with the prior condi- tion that alcohol consumption should be done only by customers seated at tables. ring outdoor speakers, but that was deleted by amendment in fa- vor of checking noise levels with a decibel meter. The vote to table the matter un- til April was approved 4-1 with Riordan opposing. Dewey tables five agenda items Dewey Beach commissioners held six agenda items over until next month. Commissioners discussed but did not vote on a draft ordinance for voter registration, a proposed ordinance to amend the definition of patron area, an ordinance to amend parking requirements for businesses, a discussion on setting a time limit for construction on approved site plans, a discussion of business fees in town. Sussex offices dosed for Thanksgiving Sussex County government of- rices will be closed Thursday, Nov. 25, and Friday, Nov. 26, to allow employees to observe tho Thanksgiving holiday. The coun- ty council will not meet on Tues- day, Nov. 23. The next regular council meeting is at 10 a.m., Tuesday, Nov. 30, in the county council chambers in Georgetown. Caroling on The Circle slated Dec. 6 Caroling on The Circle will take place at 6:30 p.m., Monday, Dec. 6, in front of the county adminis- trative office building on The Cir- cle in Georgetown. In the event of rain, the program will be held at the Georgetown Fire Hall. County Administrator Bob Stickels said the goal of Caroling on the Circle is to-raise nonperish- able food items to distribute to food banks in Sussex County. Items can be brought to the coun- nual festivities will bring food items with them for county pantries. Anyone needing assistance in transporting food may call 855- 7840. "Caroling on the Circle is an ex- cellent opportunity for Sussex countians to help Sussex coun- tians by stocking food pantries throughout the county," Stickels said. Following the event, a reception will be held at the Georgetown Fire Hall. Council donation questioned Sussex County Council on Nov. 16 donated $1,000 to the Delmar- va Christian High School for gymnasium equipment. Each of the councilmen gave $200 from councilmatic funds, available for projects in each of the council's five districts. However, frequent council crit- ic Dan Kramer, with his often re- peated refrain, calling the council- men" a bunch of turkeys," said at the end of the council meeting that the donation was wrong be- cause of the religious affiliation of the school. "It's a school based on reli- gion," Kramer said. "Why are you giving them money? They should raise it themselves." Kramer also argued Council- man Vance Phillips should have recused himself from the vote be- cause his daughter attends the school. The council disagreed with Kramer, as they routinely grant thousands of dollars each year to schools throughout the county for various needs. "I know we gave about $24,000 to Sussex Central School District last year," Phillips said. For this year, $400,000 is in the council's budget for community Council President Dale Dukes argued the grant served residents throughout the county. "The school has open enroll- ment to all Sussex countians," Dukes said. "There is community benefit." County attorney Jim Griffin Said he did not see a problem with the donation because council poli- cy allows any organization in the county, rgardless of religious af- filiation, to apply for assistance. After a short discussion, the councilmen agreed with Dukes, and they unanimously approved the grant. DPH receives another shipment of flu vaccines The Department of Public Health (DPH) received an addi- tional shipment of 12,000 doses of influenza vaccine Nov. 17. The shipment is part of an ongoing na- tional plan to allocate 22.4 million doses after half of the nation's ex- pected 2004-2005 flu vaccine supply became unavailable. Local providers and businesses have al- so given DPH 1,000 doses. DPH will operate its call center Nov. 22-23 to schedule appointments for a flu shot clinic to be conduct- ed Nov. 30. Residents should not call for appointments prior to these dates. To help DPH allocate these dos- es and anticipated shipments, DPH convened a Vaccine Alloca- tion Advisory Group. Hospitals, physicians, infectious disease spe- cialists, state legislators, and long- term care facilities are represented on this group. Based on their advice, DPH has designated 8,364 doses of the shipment for the Nov. 30 clinic for high-risk adults. Another 1,500 doses will be reserved for high- risk children older than 6 months Continued on page 4