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November 19, 2004     Cape Gazette
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Continued from page 6 to handle the growth. We are al- ready faced with the need to dra- matically improve the roads and the highways. A look at the Route I corridor will easily convince you. The water won't be the only thing affected. The need is fast ap- proaching for additional schools, water treatment facilities, sewage treatment facilities, police protec- tion, hospitals and health care. This also produces the need for people to manage and maintain these facilities. The trailing costs that follow for these same people are salaries, medical benefits for them and their family members and pension plans. Not to mentiofi the increased air pollution from all the added vehicles, and the in- creased crime rate that usually goes hand in hand with urban de- velopment. Where is all the fund- ing going to come from? I'll tell you, higher and higher taxes. Is this why you live in Sussex Coun- ty? Is this what you want for you and yours? Is this what you want for Sussex County? Mr. Rogers, you won this elec- tion by a mere three votes. I wouldn't call that a mandate. So please get your mind off of tax ratable and you and the other council members start putting Sussex County and the environ- ment first. Another election will be here before you know it. We missed an opportunity to put Mr. Bennett in office this time, but the next election may achieve a dif- ferent result. I am a very disappointed Sussex County resident. Jim Shumante Lewes Dennis Forney Sussex voting machines may need some checking Was there a problem atthe polls that should have been addressed on Election Day? The Cape Gazette Return Day souvenir edi- tion, Election 2004, lists how Sus- sex County voted. If the stated figures are correct, we have a problem. Sussex County cast a total of 77,555 for president but for the U.S. Congress, the total cast was 74,671, making 2,884 more peo- ple casting a presidential ballot than a ballot for the U.S. Con- gress. " For governor, Sussex County cast a total of 76,241 ballots, which means 1,314 more people cast a ballot for president than a ballot for governor. Sussex County cast a total of 74,004 ballots for lieutenant gov- ernor, which means that 3,551 more people cast a presidential ballot than a ballot for lieutenant governor. Not too many Sussex County voters must have given a rat's be- hind about insurance commis- sioner, because they only cast 72,715 ballots, making a whop- ping 4,840 more people casting a presidential ballot than a ballot for insurance commissioner. Last but not least, we have Sus- sex Clerk of the Peace with 73,812 ballots, making 3,743 more people casting a ballot for president than for Clerk of the Peace. Do you think that all these peo- ple voted for a president and de- cided to leave the rest of the ballot blank or do you think perhaps the voting machines need checking in Sussex County and probably the rest of the nation, too. Pat Ulrich Rehoboth Beach Thanks to Sussex Countians for support I would like to thank all the people who worked hard in my re-election over the last several moths. Your hard work and kind- ness will be ingrained in my heart and memory for the rest of my life. I would like to expresg my most sincere thanks to all the Sus- sex Countians who visited polls on Nov. 2 and the Election De- partment workers who worked re- lentlessly during the election and diligently for several days follow- ing the election. As many of you know, my race was decided by three votes. Since Election Day, I have had the pleasure of meeting hundreds of voters who now realize their votes, as well as those of their friends and families," made a dif- ference. This election has made me proud to be a Sussex Countian and an American. Our democratic process has proven to be still functioning after 200 years. Many times during an election people get the attitude that one vote will not make a difference. I believe my race has confirmed that every vote counts, that the majority rules and that your voice can be heard. During the last eight years, I have worked for Sussex Coun- tians. I appreciate each of your *votes to allow me to continue to work for you. While at times we may not always agree, I will con- tinue my pledge of the last eight years: to listen to you and weigh your comments in my decision making proces s. I am committed to following the laws of the land, continuing to improve the quality of life for Sussex Countians and protecting your property rights. While we may have many tough decisions to make in up coming years, it is time for all Sussex Countians to join together and work towards a better future. We need to carry a unanimous single voice to Dover that we can no longer be the forgotten stepchild. We need the state to begin to accept their responsibili- ty and become proactive in pro- viding the funds and work to im- prove our infrastructure that they control. The existing Sussex County Council has been proac- tive with the infrastructure that we control so that it is ready to meet the needs of Sussex County. It is now time that the state meet the needs of Sussex County. In the up coming months, I will con- tinue to schedule various activi- ties to meet with Sussex Coun- tians to talk one on one about your concerns and desires for Sussex County. Once again, I would like to thank all Sussex Countians for al- lowing me to represent you for the next four years, Together we will continue to make Sussex County a great place to live, work and raise our children Lynn Rogers Sussex County Councilman County council is ,- paving over Sussex The recent close election for Sussex County Council where I lost to Lynn Rogers by three votes should have sent a loud and clear message to these council mem- bers. The message was that they need to manage growth by con- sidering the impact of every de- velopment application on our in- land bays, the effect on traffic, and the will of the citizens who live nearby. Again and again and now again, this renegade council has arrogantly chosen to ignore the best interests of Eastern Sus- sex County. The paving over of Sussex County continues. When Dale Dukes won re-elec- tion by 1 percent of the vote, his statement to the press was, "It will be business as usual." The ap- proval of the 3 Seasons Camp- ground development, complete with duplexes and townhouses, at the end of Country Club Road near Rehoboth was indeed busi- ness as usual. The Planning and Zoning Commission recommend- ed single family houses only. This is what the existing AR 1 zoning permitted and this is only what should have been allowed. The Council however chose to permit a zoning change which allows the maximum coverage of this prop- erty and the maximum profit for the developers. Over 500 local citizens protest- ed this application; the develop- ment will definitely destroy one o.f the most pristine areas on the east coast, will further pollute the Rehoboth Bay, will compromise traffic flow on Country Club Road and Route One, and will generally destroy the quality of life of the local citizens. We can- not blame the developers because they are in business to make as much money as possible and move on to the next enterprise. Continued on page 8 CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, Nov. 19 - Nov. 22, 2004 - 7 On a quiet midweek night, the waterfront brews up a stew of fear and owls and a troubling sign Things were quiet on Savannah Road in Lewes Wednesday night. At 9 p.m. the firehouse was shut down as I walked past. I thbught about former fire chief Lou Rickards and how proud he was of the firehouse that his building committee had constructed. "You're going to like what we build," Lou told me one day. "We really want it to fit into the histor- ical feel of Lewes." Lou didn't let the community down - never did. I always thought it was a slap in the face of the fire company when a number of residents opposed and success- fully knocked down a proposal by the volunteers to put up one of the changeable signs that allow the community to know about special events going on at the fire hall or important items such as checking smoke detector batteries twice a year when daylight savings time comes in and out. Detractors said the sign didn't "fit" with Lewes. Too much like a real community I guess. Rehoboth and Milton are less pretentious in that respect. Those who want to get a sense of the pride that Lou felt for his community and his family's lega- cy should pick up the latest - No. 7 - journal of the Lewes Histori- cal Society. Among several arti- cles is a piece Lou never pub- lished before he died tragically in an automobile accident. "Grub- bing Them Boats" is about the Rickards family business of sup- plying the boats that made an in- dustry of fishing for menhaden. Lou's resting now in the Bethel cemetery I passed while headed toward the canal. A few t,3bles of late diners sat up in the warm light of the Buttery. People mingled inside the recess- es of Striper Bites and the town's one stoplight cycled through green, yellow and red as a few cars crossed from Front Street to Gills Neck Road or rumbled over the drawbridge and the still canal below, I turned my feet into the empty parking lot of The Lighthouse. In- to the winter season now, the restaurant's employees anti, own- ers take a break on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Lewes' boardwalk BAREF00TIN' is always open however, extend- ing all the way from the canal bridge to J.B.'s boatyard, between boats backed into their slips and parking lots, condos, restaurants and the Lewes Harbour Marina bait and tackle shop. It's a fine stroll, no matter the time of the year, no matter the time of day. Halfway up the boardwalk, just before I reached Irish Eyes at An- glers, the hooting of an owl caught my ears. The distinctive sound - coming as regular as the bellow- ing of a foghorn from the break- water lights - originated beyond the fishing boats lined up along ei- ther side of the boat lift. Between the hoots, as I passed Joe and Amanda's bait and tackle shop, the gurgling sound of seawater circulating through covered tanks and tubs of slimy and snaky eels slipped into my brain. A white-tail deer, its sharp, hard hooves scraping through the stones of the boatyard, slipped off between dry-docked boats into the phragmites behind Lewes Beach. I stopped for a moment to watch it disappear and then the owl called again. Was it real, or was it one of those fake owls I saw sitting high atop the mainmast of a boat named Hours Aweigh? The an- swer cathe when the owl - the stars of the clear night sky behind it - leaned forward on its roost to give purchase to its next round of hooting. If those sounds were yel- low, I would swear they were pouring slowly like cooling butter into the crescent of the thick and rich half moon floating low in the western sky. Continued om page 8 Dennis Fomey photo This sign along the canal in Lewes tends to discourage in- terlopers from walking onto docks where they don't belong. It also does little to encourage swimming in the canal. Continued from page 6 to handle the growth. We are al- ready faced with the need to dra- matically improve the roads and the highways. A look at the Route I corridor will easily convince you. The water won't be the only thing affected. The need is fast ap- proaching for additional schools, water treatment facilities, sewage treatment facilities, police protec- tion, hospitals and health care. This also produces the need for people to manage and maintain these facilities. The trailing costs that follow for these same people are salaries, medical benefits for them and their family members and pension plans. Not to mentiofi the increased air pollution from all the added vehicles, and the in- creased crime rate that usually goes hand in hand with urban de- velopment. Where is all the fund- ing going to come from? I'll tell you, higher and higher taxes. Is this why you live in Sussex Coun- ty? Is this what you want for you and yours? Is this what you want for Sussex County? Mr. Rogers, you won this elec- tion by a mere three votes. I wouldn't call that a mandate. So please get your mind off of tax ratable and you and the other council members start putting Sussex County and the environ- ment first. Another election will be here before you know it. We missed an opportunity to put Mr. Bennett in office this time, but the next election may achieve a dif- ferent result. I am a very disappointed Sussex County resident. Jim Shumante Lewes Dennis Forney Sussex voting machines may need some checking Was there a problem atthe polls that should have been addressed on Election Day? The Cape Gazette Return Day souvenir edi- tion, Election 2004, lists how Sus- sex County voted. If the stated figures are correct, we have a problem. Sussex County cast a total of 77,555 for president but for the U.S. Congress, the total cast was 74,671, making 2,884 more peo- ple casting a presidential ballot than a ballot for the U.S. Con- gress. " For governor, Sussex County cast a total of 76,241 ballots, which means 1,314 more people cast a ballot for president than a ballot for governor. Sussex County cast a total of 74,004 ballots for lieutenant gov- ernor, which means that 3,551 more people cast a presidential ballot than a ballot for lieutenant governor. Not too many Sussex County voters must have given a rat's be- hind about insurance commis- sioner, because they only cast 72,715 ballots, making a whop- ping 4,840 more people casting a presidential ballot than a ballot for insurance commissioner. Last but not least, we have Sus- sex Clerk of the Peace with 73,812 ballots, making 3,743 more people casting a ballot for president than for Clerk of the Peace. Do you think that all these peo- ple voted for a president and de- cided to leave the rest of the ballot blank or do you think perhaps the voting machines need checking in Sussex County and probably the rest of the nation, too. Pat Ulrich Rehoboth Beach Thanks to Sussex Countians for support I would like to thank all the people who worked hard in my re-election over the last several moths. Your hard work and kind- ness will be ingrained in my heart and memory for the rest of my life. I would like to expresg my most sincere thanks to all the Sus- sex Countians who visited polls on Nov. 2 and the Election De- partment workers who worked re- lentlessly during the election and diligently for several days follow- ing the election. As many of you know, my race was decided by three votes. Since Election Day, I have had the pleasure of meeting hundreds of voters who now realize their votes, as well as those of their friends and families," made a dif- ference. This election has made me proud to be a Sussex Countian and an American. Our democratic process has proven to be still functioning after 200 years. Many times during an election people get the attitude that one vote will not make a difference. I believe my race has confirmed that every vote counts, that the majority rules and that your voice can be heard. During the last eight years, I have worked for Sussex Coun- tians. I appreciate each of your *votes to allow me to continue to work for you. While at times we may not always agree, I will con- tinue my pledge of the last eight years: to listen to you and weigh your comments in my decision making proces s. I am committed to following the laws of the land, continuing to improve the quality of life for Sussex Countians and protecting your property rights. While we may have many tough decisions to make in up coming years, it is time for all Sussex Countians to join together and work towards a better future. We need to carry a unanimous single voice to Dover that we can no longer be the forgotten stepchild. We need the state to begin to accept their responsibili- ty and become proactive in pro- viding the funds and work to im- prove our infrastructure that they control. The existing Sussex County Council has been proac- tive with the infrastructure that we control so that it is ready to meet the needs of Sussex County. It is now time that the state meet the needs of Sussex County. In the up coming months, I will con- tinue to schedule various activi- ties to meet with Sussex Coun- tians to talk one on one about your concerns and desires for Sussex County. Once again, I would like to thank all Sussex Countians for al- lowing me to represent you for the next four years, Together we will continue to make Sussex County a great place to live, work and raise our children Lynn Rogers Sussex County Councilman County council is ,- paving over Sussex The recent close election for Sussex County Council where I lost to Lynn Rogers by three votes should have sent a loud and clear message to these council mem- bers. The message was that they need to manage growth by con- sidering the impact of every de- velopment application on our in- land bays, the effect on traffic, and the will of the citizens who live nearby. Again and again and now again, this renegade council has arrogantly chosen to ignore the best interests of Eastern Sus- sex County. The paving over of Sussex County continues. When Dale Dukes won re-elec- tion by 1 percent of the vote, his statement to the press was, "It will be business as usual." The ap- proval of the 3 Seasons Camp- ground development, complete with duplexes and townhouses, at the end of Country Club Road near Rehoboth was indeed busi- ness as usual. The Planning and Zoning Commission recommend- ed single family houses only. This is what the existing AR 1 zoning permitted and this is only what should have been allowed. The Council however chose to permit a zoning change which allows the maximum coverage of this prop- erty and the maximum profit for the developers. Over 500 local citizens protest- ed this application; the develop- ment will definitely destroy one o.f the most pristine areas on the east coast, will further pollute the Rehoboth Bay, will compromise traffic flow on Country Club Road and Route One, and will generally destroy the quality of life of the local citizens. We can- not blame the developers because they are in business to make as much money as possible and move on to the next enterprise. Continued on page 8 CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, Nov. 19 - Nov. 22, 2004 - 7 On a quiet midweek night, the waterfront brews up a stew of fear and owls and a troubling sign Things were quiet on Savannah Road in Lewes Wednesday night. At 9 p.m. the firehouse was shut down as I walked past. I thbught about former fire chief Lou Rickards and how proud he was of the firehouse that his building committee had constructed. "You're going to like what we build," Lou told me one day. "We really want it to fit into the histor- ical feel of Lewes." Lou didn't let the community down - never did. I always thought it was a slap in the face of the fire company when a number of residents opposed and success- fully knocked down a proposal by the volunteers to put up one of the changeable signs that allow the community to know about special events going on at the fire hall or important items such as checking smoke detector batteries twice a year when daylight savings time comes in and out. Detractors said the sign didn't "fit" with Lewes. Too much like a real community I guess. Rehoboth and Milton are less pretentious in that respect. Those who want to get a sense of the pride that Lou felt for his community and his family's lega- cy should pick up the latest - No. 7 - journal of the Lewes Histori- cal Society. Among several arti- cles is a piece Lou never pub- lished before he died tragically in an automobile accident. "Grub- bing Them Boats" is about the Rickards family business of sup- plying the boats that made an in- dustry of fishing for menhaden. Lou's resting now in the Bethel cemetery I passed while headed toward the canal. A few t,3bles of late diners sat up in the warm light of the Buttery. People mingled inside the recess- es of Striper Bites and the town's one stoplight cycled through green, yellow and red as a few cars crossed from Front Street to Gills Neck Road or rumbled over the drawbridge and the still canal below, I turned my feet into the empty parking lot of The Lighthouse. In- to the winter season now, the restaurant's employees anti, own- ers take a break on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Lewes' boardwalk BAREF00TIN' is always open however, extend- ing all the way from the canal bridge to J.B.'s boatyard, between boats backed into their slips and parking lots, condos, restaurants and the Lewes Harbour Marina bait and tackle shop. It's a fine stroll, no matter the time of the year, no matter the time of day. Halfway up the boardwalk, just before I reached Irish Eyes at An- glers, the hooting of an owl caught my ears. The distinctive sound - coming as regular as the bellow- ing of a foghorn from the break- water lights - originated beyond the fishing boats lined up along ei- ther side of the boat lift. Between the hoots, as I passed Joe and Amanda's bait and tackle shop, the gurgling sound of seawater circulating through covered tanks and tubs of slimy and snaky eels slipped into my brain. A white-tail deer, its sharp, hard hooves scraping through the stones of the boatyard, slipped off between dry-docked boats into the phragmites behind Lewes Beach. I stopped for a moment to watch it disappear and then the owl called again. Was it real, or was it one of those fake owls I saw sitting high atop the mainmast of a boat named Hours Aweigh? The an- swer cathe when the owl - the stars of the clear night sky behind it - leaned forward on its roost to give purchase to its next round of hooting. If those sounds were yel- low, I would swear they were pouring slowly like cooling butter into the crescent of the thick and rich half moon floating low in the western sky. Continued om page 8 Dennis Fomey photo This sign along the canal in Lewes tends to discourage in- terlopers from walking onto docks where they don't belong. It also does little to encourage swimming in the canal.