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November 19, 2004     Cape Gazette
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8 - CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, Nov. 19 - Nov, 22 2004 Continued from page 7 We can only blame the elected officials 2,vho allow these abomi- nations. Soon you will see a Lynn Rogers sign advertising the devel- opment and see the Tyvec appli- cation advertising Dukes Lumber covering the buildings. It is "busi- ness as usual." For the record, the vote as usual was Cole, no, Rogers abstained (due to his usual business con- flicts), Dukes, yes, Jones, yes, and Phillips, yes. The next item on the list is Nas- sau Grove near Red Mill. This is another environmentally sensitive area and another re/tuested zoning change to maximize the develop- er's profit. I predict it will be busi- ness as usual, except Rogers won't have to recuse himself this time, so the vote will be 4 to 1 to approve. The paving over of Sus- sex County continues! Judson Bennett Lewes Sussex council should be commended In Ms. Deaver's letter to the ed- itor complaining about actions taken by Sussex County Council she wrongly reports her under- standing of the County Cluster Development Ordinance. I have found many people are confused by the term "density" versus lot size. The new ordinance allows smaller lots; this doesn't mean it allows more lots within a dex, el- opment. The ordinance offers opportuni- ty for additional flexibility in de- signing subdivisions. The term density is used to determine the number of lots per acre that one can subdivide their lands into. Under the right conditions, for ex- ample, if you own 10 acres of agricultural upland you could cur- rently subdivide this land into 20 home sites, each consisting of 20,000 square feet. This translates into a density of two units per acre. Under the new cluster development, you would be allowed the same density (two units per acre) or 20 home sites; however, you could make the 20 lots smaller, to a minimum size of 7,500 sq. ft. -  The smaller size lot doesn't al- low five units per acre as Joan has interpreted the ordinance. It is not an up-zoning. The remaining lands would be open space. The county should be commended for the change, not condemned. Tom Ford Land Design Inc. Gubernatorial candidate thanks voters The campaign is over and I share with each of you the disap- pointment that only comes with a race well run, but lost. I thank you for all your efforts on our behalf. My gratitude is particularly ex- tended to our staff, our volunteers and our contributors whose com- mitment brought us to the brink of victory. I know that you will continue to pursue our vision of excellence for Delaware and hope that we have awakened the conscience of our citizenry to create the momen- tum for change. My special thanks to C.O.A.D., EO.P., to all the correction staff, teachers, police and other state employees, who cannot simply call it a good effort and get on with their lives. They must contin- ue to fight the good fight every day. That also applies to the health- care professionals and environ- mentalists who risked involve- ment in our campaign in the hope "that we could affect meaningful change. Their battle, for all of us. con- tinues. As for me, I look forward to a period of rest and recovery, and more time with my family. It's ap- propriate that Thanksgiving so Closely follows elections. I will be especially thankful for our effort, our experiences, our friendships and my family during the upcom- ing holiday. Again, I offer my sincere thariks for your commitment to this cam- paign and pray that the holidays bring you peace, joy, the love of family and hope for the future. God bless you all. Bill Lee (Judge William Swain Lee) Rehoboth Beach Barefootin' - t Continued from page 7 The hooting of the owl foh lowed me into the tall phragmites at the end of the boatyard. It was dark there with uncertain footing in the shadows and I stepped gin- gerly half expecting to startle a deer trying to rest during the shot- gun season. Bits of uncertain fear rolled around in my belly as I turned around to leave the darkness of the thick growth. The owl and the lights of the boatyard guided ine back, and I retraced my steps to- ward the boardwalkJ Then I no- ticed a sign, alongside the boat- ................... yard launching ramp, that I hadn't noticed before. The word "DAN- GER" has a way of grabbing our attention. The sign looked official enough, but is it really possible that the state is conducting a water moccasin breeding study along the Lewes-Rehoboth Canal? In the dark of night when everything is quiet and there are few distrac- tions other than the hooting of an owl, signs such as this one sink deeper into the consciousness. I looked over the edge of the dock alongside the concrete r arnp and saw no signs of water moccasins. The primordial vision of hundreds of eels in those gurgling tubs did however come to mind. Democrats are the real keepers of morality It is stated repeatedly that the Republicans won the election of 2004 because they put more stress on "moral values" than the De- mocrats. According to this inter- pretation, the Democrats neglect- ed moral values in favor of the "'mechanics" of policy. This is a faulty explanation of the Republican victory. Only the two parties had different moral values. And the Republican moral values played mostly in the south, which is a repository of beliefs that cannot long survive or domi- nate in this century. If the moral values of the Democrats had re- ceived proper publicity and had not been colored by induced fears of terrorism, their values and ar- guments would have been much higher on the scale than the Re- publican. The Democrats, for ex- ample, gave a higher value to peace governed by diplomacy, whereas the Republicans, under George Bush, counseled preven- tive war. Democrats believed in keeping the jobs of the working and middle classes, while Repub- licans pursued the aim of free in- vestments abroad. Democrats were more inclined to tolerate the politics and movements of the outside world; in short, to live with diversity, while Republicans would resort to bloody "regime change" in countries they dis- liked. Democrats supported ex- tension of social benefits and medical coverage, in accordance with the ordinary standards of the rest of the world, while Republi- cans preached curtailment of ben- efits and financial succor to cor- porations and the rich. Democrats pursued preservation of the envi- ronment, especially by promoting sources of renewable energy, while Republicans opposed and reversed any antipollution meas- ures that might have lowered business profits, even if temporar- ily. Democrats would have soft- ened the brutalities of the war by maintaining the restraints of the Geneva Convention, while Re- publicans justified torture of pris- oners of war in the interests of vengeance and empire. Indeed. if the election of 2004 had been decided in conformity with codes of real morality, not On the other side of the ramp, tacked to a piling, was another sign, however, that was real. They're posted all along the wa- terfront and are far more sobering than eels or water moccasins or fleeing deer or hooting owls. The sign shows a fish with a circle around it and a diagonal line across the circle. It's the sign that says we should severely limit the amount of fish we eat from our coastal waters because of heavy metal pollution. It's not nature and darkness that we have to fear. It's the short- sighted actions of humans, work- ing contrary to the balance of na- ture, that should really upset our stomachs. made-up morality, the Democrats would have won hands-down. Lou Noiting Lewes Thoughts on mandatory recycling Recycling does not have to be mandatory. Other areas of the country have systems in place that pick up recycling for free, yes free, and at curbside. Of course it is fled to the regular trash pick up which is '*pay as you throw". The way this works is that the more you recycle, the less your trash bill is since you have a lot less trash to be picked up because of recycling. To add another $3 to $7 per month for recycling is not the way to go and people will re- sent it. If the state is genuinely se- rious about recycling, which I am sure they are, then they need to adopt a system with incentives to allow us to lower our trash bill. The state reaps big benefits as well by not having to "buy" more land for more land fills that will soon_be needed. And that just opens up another can of worms. Earl Bell Rehoboth Beach Reader implores resort to keep bandstand The following letter was sent to Rehoboth Beach city manager Greg Ferrese, with a copy submit- ted to the Cape Gazette for publi- cation. I am writing you in an attempt to persuade you to make the right decision regarding the future of the Rehoboth Beach bandstand. I live in Milford and have been here since 1982. I have performed many times at the bandstand with the Milford Community Band, the Smooth Sound Dance Band and my own folk group. I of course know Ruth Hayes, who is ex- tremely dedicated to bringing good quality entertainment to Re- hoboth Beach. She is very consci- entious with her commitment to programming a variety of acts, setting up the schedule, communi- cations and preparations for every engagement. The thousands of residents and visitors that frequent the Rehoboth Beach boardwalk are indebted to Ruth for all her tireless hard work in assembling a wonderful concert schedule each year. Ruth knows what it takes for a performance to work. The Rehoboth Beach Bandstand can easily handle a single performer up to a full size concert band with dancers. There is adequate stage height with the various levels, plenty of stage space, changing rooms, bathrooms, a good sound system, chairs, music stands, good audience space with bench or grass seating, and parking for performers. It has everything nec- essary for the performers and the audience members to comfortably enjoy a program o'f entertainment. At most, it could use a facelift. I hope in your evaluation/as- sessment of the bandstand's fu- ture, you consider all the ingredi- ents I have mentioned above in making any recommendations for a new design. Anything less would show a complete lack of appreciation, respect and under- standing as to the importance and value the bandstand holds. The current bandstand in its location and large, open structure is a defining landmark of Rehoboth. Please do not take any action that would in any way lessen its ap- peal and its well-deserved and earned reputation. A gazebo would be completely unaccept- able as a replacement. If needed, I would be happy to serve in any way to assist in planning and up- dating the bandstand so thousands more will continue to enjoy all the bandstand offers for years and years to come. Miehelle Peters Milford 117 SILVERLAKE DRIVE Silverlake is considered one of the most prestigious addresses in Rehoboth Beach. This magnificent home anchors not only the lakeside, but also captures the epitome of classic beach style cottages. Completely renovated by the owner/designer, the details found in this gem define perfection and include custom features not found innew homes built today. With unobstructed lake and ocean views, the home and guest house boast 3,500 sq.ft, in total, 5 bedrooms/5 baths, a heated pool, won- derful entertaining areas including multiple decks and brick patios, lush gardens and privacy. You've seen its design emulated, now is ,at your opportunity to own the real thing.   CALL TO SCHEDULE YOUR rmVATE ' TOUR OF THIS trnIQUE HOME. 8 - CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, Nov. 19 - Nov, 22 2004 Continued from page 7 We can only blame the elected officials 2,vho allow these abomi- nations. Soon you will see a Lynn Rogers sign advertising the devel- opment and see the Tyvec appli- cation advertising Dukes Lumber covering the buildings. It is "busi- ness as usual." For the record, the vote as usual was Cole, no, Rogers abstained (due to his usual business con- flicts), Dukes, yes, Jones, yes, and Phillips, yes. The next item on the list is Nas- sau Grove near Red Mill. This is another environmentally sensitive area and another re/tuested zoning change to maximize the develop- er's profit. I predict it will be busi- ness as usual, except Rogers won't have to recuse himself this time, so the vote will be 4 to 1 to approve. The paving over of Sus- sex County continues! Judson Bennett Lewes Sussex council should be commended In Ms. Deaver's letter to the ed- itor complaining about actions taken by Sussex County Council she wrongly reports her under- standing of the County Cluster Development Ordinance. I have found many people are confused by the term "density" versus lot size. The new ordinance allows smaller lots; this doesn't mean it allows more lots within a dex, el- opment. The ordinance offers opportuni- ty for additional flexibility in de- signing subdivisions. The term density is used to determine the number of lots per acre that one can subdivide their lands into. Under the right conditions, for ex- ample, if you own 10 acres of agricultural upland you could cur- rently subdivide this land into 20 home sites, each consisting of 20,000 square feet. This translates into a density of two units per acre. Under the new cluster development, you would be allowed the same density (two units per acre) or 20 home sites; however, you could make the 20 lots smaller, to a minimum size of 7,500 sq. ft. -  The smaller size lot doesn't al- low five units per acre as Joan has interpreted the ordinance. It is not an up-zoning. The remaining lands would be open space. The county should be commended for the change, not condemned. Tom Ford Land Design Inc. Gubernatorial candidate thanks voters The campaign is over and I share with each of you the disap- pointment that only comes with a race well run, but lost. I thank you for all your efforts on our behalf. My gratitude is particularly ex- tended to our staff, our volunteers and our contributors whose com- mitment brought us to the brink of victory. I know that you will continue to pursue our vision of excellence for Delaware and hope that we have awakened the conscience of our citizenry to create the momen- tum for change. My special thanks to C.O.A.D., EO.P., to all the correction staff, teachers, police and other state employees, who cannot simply call it a good effort and get on with their lives. They must contin- ue to fight the good fight every day. That also applies to the health- care professionals and environ- mentalists who risked involve- ment in our campaign in the hope "that we could affect meaningful change. Their battle, for all of us. con- tinues. As for me, I look forward to a period of rest and recovery, and more time with my family. It's ap- propriate that Thanksgiving so Closely follows elections. I will be especially thankful for our effort, our experiences, our friendships and my family during the upcom- ing holiday. Again, I offer my sincere thariks for your commitment to this cam- paign and pray that the holidays bring you peace, joy, the love of family and hope for the future. God bless you all. Bill Lee (Judge William Swain Lee) Rehoboth Beach Barefootin' - t Continued from page 7 The hooting of the owl foh lowed me into the tall phragmites at the end of the boatyard. It was dark there with uncertain footing in the shadows and I stepped gin- gerly half expecting to startle a deer trying to rest during the shot- gun season. Bits of uncertain fear rolled around in my belly as I turned around to leave the darkness of the thick growth. The owl and the lights of the boatyard guided ine back, and I retraced my steps to- ward the boardwalkJ Then I no- ticed a sign, alongside the boat- ................... yard launching ramp, that I hadn't noticed before. The word "DAN- GER" has a way of grabbing our attention. The sign looked official enough, but is it really possible that the state is conducting a water moccasin breeding study along the Lewes-Rehoboth Canal? In the dark of night when everything is quiet and there are few distrac- tions other than the hooting of an owl, signs such as this one sink deeper into the consciousness. I looked over the edge of the dock alongside the concrete r arnp and saw no signs of water moccasins. The primordial vision of hundreds of eels in those gurgling tubs did however come to mind. Democrats are the real keepers of morality It is stated repeatedly that the Republicans won the election of 2004 because they put more stress on "moral values" than the De- mocrats. According to this inter- pretation, the Democrats neglect- ed moral values in favor of the "'mechanics" of policy. This is a faulty explanation of the Republican victory. Only the two parties had different moral values. And the Republican moral values played mostly in the south, which is a repository of beliefs that cannot long survive or domi- nate in this century. If the moral values of the Democrats had re- ceived proper publicity and had not been colored by induced fears of terrorism, their values and ar- guments would have been much higher on the scale than the Re- publican. The Democrats, for ex- ample, gave a higher value to peace governed by diplomacy, whereas the Republicans, under George Bush, counseled preven- tive war. Democrats believed in keeping the jobs of the working and middle classes, while Repub- licans pursued the aim of free in- vestments abroad. Democrats were more inclined to tolerate the politics and movements of the outside world; in short, to live with diversity, while Republicans would resort to bloody "regime change" in countries they dis- liked. Democrats supported ex- tension of social benefits and medical coverage, in accordance with the ordinary standards of the rest of the world, while Republi- cans preached curtailment of ben- efits and financial succor to cor- porations and the rich. Democrats pursued preservation of the envi- ronment, especially by promoting sources of renewable energy, while Republicans opposed and reversed any antipollution meas- ures that might have lowered business profits, even if temporar- ily. Democrats would have soft- ened the brutalities of the war by maintaining the restraints of the Geneva Convention, while Re- publicans justified torture of pris- oners of war in the interests of vengeance and empire. Indeed. if the election of 2004 had been decided in conformity with codes of real morality, not On the other side of the ramp, tacked to a piling, was another sign, however, that was real. They're posted all along the wa- terfront and are far more sobering than eels or water moccasins or fleeing deer or hooting owls. The sign shows a fish with a circle around it and a diagonal line across the circle. It's the sign that says we should severely limit the amount of fish we eat from our coastal waters because of heavy metal pollution. It's not nature and darkness that we have to fear. It's the short- sighted actions of humans, work- ing contrary to the balance of na- ture, that should really upset our stomachs. made-up morality, the Democrats would have won hands-down. Lou Noiting Lewes Thoughts on mandatory recycling Recycling does not have to be mandatory. Other areas of the country have systems in place that pick up recycling for free, yes free, and at curbside. Of course it is fled to the regular trash pick up which is '*pay as you throw". The way this works is that the more you recycle, the less your trash bill is since you have a lot less trash to be picked up because of recycling. To add another $3 to $7 per month for recycling is not the way to go and people will re- sent it. If the state is genuinely se- rious about recycling, which I am sure they are, then they need to adopt a system with incentives to allow us to lower our trash bill. The state reaps big benefits as well by not having to "buy" more land for more land fills that will soon_be needed. And that just opens up another can of worms. Earl Bell Rehoboth Beach Reader implores resort to keep bandstand The following letter was sent to Rehoboth Beach city manager Greg Ferrese, with a copy submit- ted to the Cape Gazette for publi- cation. I am writing you in an attempt to persuade you to make the right decision regarding the future of the Rehoboth Beach bandstand. I live in Milford and have been here since 1982. I have performed many times at the bandstand with the Milford Community Band, the Smooth Sound Dance Band and my own folk group. I of course know Ruth Hayes, who is ex- tremely dedicated to bringing good quality entertainment to Re- hoboth Beach. She is very consci- entious with her commitment to programming a variety of acts, setting up the schedule, communi- cations and preparations for every engagement. The thousands of residents and visitors that frequent the Rehoboth Beach boardwalk are indebted to Ruth for all her tireless hard work in assembling a wonderful concert schedule each year. Ruth knows what it takes for a performance to work. The Rehoboth Beach Bandstand can easily handle a single performer up to a full size concert band with dancers. There is adequate stage height with the various levels, plenty of stage space, changing rooms, bathrooms, a good sound system, chairs, music stands, good audience space with bench or grass seating, and parking for performers. It has everything nec- essary for the performers and the audience members to comfortably enjoy a program o'f entertainment. At most, it could use a facelift. I hope in your evaluation/as- sessment of the bandstand's fu- ture, you consider all the ingredi- ents I have mentioned above in making any recommendations for a new design. Anything less would show a complete lack of appreciation, respect and under- standing as to the importance and value the bandstand holds. The current bandstand in its location and large, open structure is a defining landmark of Rehoboth. Please do not take any action that would in any way lessen its ap- peal and its well-deserved and earned reputation. A gazebo would be completely unaccept- able as a replacement. If needed, I would be happy to serve in any way to assist in planning and up- dating the bandstand so thousands more will continue to enjoy all the bandstand offers for years and years to come. Miehelle Peters Milford 117 SILVERLAKE DRIVE Silverlake is considered one of the most prestigious addresses in Rehoboth Beach. This magnificent home anchors not only the lakeside, but also captures the epitome of classic beach style cottages. Completely renovated by the owner/designer, the details found in this gem define perfection and include custom features not found innew homes built today. With unobstructed lake and ocean views, the home and guest house boast 3,500 sq.ft, in total, 5 bedrooms/5 baths, a heated pool, won- derful entertaining areas including multiple decks and brick patios, lush gardens and privacy. You've seen its design emulated, now is ,at your opportunity to own the real thing.   CALL TO SCHEDULE YOUR rmVATE ' TOUR OF THIS trnIQUE HOME.