Newspaper Archive of
Cape Gazette
Lewes, Delaware
Jim's Towing Service
November 19, 2004     Cape Gazette
PAGE 33     (33 of 148 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 33     (33 of 148 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
November 19, 2004
 

Newspaper Archive of Cape Gazette produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




 CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, Nov. 19- Nov. 22, 2004.33 BUsiNE00ss & REAL00E'STATE Chunkin, Jazz Fest draw honors from Southern Delaware Tourism By Jim Cresson Punkin Chunkin Association President Frank Shade and Re- hoboth Beach Jazz Festival founder Sydney Arzt were hon- ored for their contributions to tourism at the third annual awards ceremony of Southern Delaware Tourism Nov. 16 at Sussex Pines Country Club. Over the past 19 years, the lo- cally created Punkin Chunkin World Championship has grown from a handful of contestants and a few score fans to more than 80 contestants and more than 30,000 fans. For its tremendous populari- ty as a destination event, Punkin Chunkin was chosen this year as one of the American Bus Associa- tion's (ABA) top 100 special events nationwide. Past ABA- sponsored awards bestowed by Southern Delaware Tourism in- clude the Sea Witch Festival and Coast Day. For 15 years, the Rehoboth Beach Autumn Jazz Festival has brought tens of thousands of mu- sic lovers to Rehoboth Beach and Dewey Beach to hear some of the best jazz musicians in the country. For that success, Jazz Fest founder Arzt was honored with the 2004 Southern Delaware Tourism Award. "We have a very unique county with individuals and groups that start small local events which of- ten grow to become very big and , very popular," said Karen O'Neill, executive director of Southern Delaware Tourism. "We've become such a popular shoulder-season destination be- cause of our special events that we're now competing with Martha's Vineyard and Annapo- lis." Arzt spoke of her involvement in the Rehoboth Beach Autumn Jazz Festival, saying that when she moved to Rehoboth Beach 20 years ago, "I never believed I'd have the chance to impact tourism the way the jazz festival has." Shade said that although Punkin Chunkin regularly attracts more than 30,000 people, "There's al- ways room for more." Shade also said that he and Punkin Chunkin Association officers, with the help of Sussex County administrator Bob Stickels, are diligently searching for a new chunkin loca, tion that could be purchased as a permanent home for the world's championship event. "For us chunkers, we believe to a person that the event should stay here in Sussex," said Shade. Rob Marshall, cochalr of South- em Delaware Tourism and owner of Atlantic Oceanside MOtel and Suites in Dewey Beach, discussed Southern Delaware Tourism's role as a convention and visitors bu- reau. Marshall said Southern Delaware Tourism receives a por- Jim Cresson photos Punkin Chunkin Association President Frank Shade accepts the American Bus Association award from Amy Wood, marketing manager for Southern Delaware Tourism. The American Bus Association rated the annual Punkin Chunkin World Championship in Sussex as one of the top 100 events in the nation. tion of state lodging tax money and distributes it to local cham- bers of commerce to promote their local area and events. "Strong chambers make strong communities," said Marshall. "Businesses benefit from the chambers, and the chambers not only provide lots of volunteers for . ./ tourism events, but they also give a lot of feedback to Southern Delaware Tourism. All of us are always iooking for ways to pro- mote tourism and publicize local chamber and business events." Marshall said Southern Delaware Tourism and local chambers develop marketing plans identifying what is best for each community and what they want to promote. He said that Delaware currently has the lowest tourism budget in the nation. De- spite that, Marshall said; Delaware has.one of the highest returns on its promotional market- ing, drawing many; many visitors to the area. "Let people know that we al- Continued on page 34 Pr" "" "als " oou00t00,notcr entl ,lead,toaccumula00veealtll : !.= .. "  ' :17 .... : _  :-::,-i : " .......  ..:. t. .... , In "Webster,s New World Dic-" tionary" and "Thesaurus" the edi- tors list the following as types of investments: stocks, bonds, secu- rities, property, real estate, mort- gage, capital, mutual funds, hedge funds, debentures, futures, pre- cious metals and gems. And these are the types of investments that we normally discuss in the finan- cial arena on a daily basis. In my opinion, "Webster's Dic- tionary" has left out the most im- portant type of investment that ex- ists. That is the investment that our parents lay out for us during our formative years and the in- vestment we place in ourselves in our adult years. In other words, it is the time and money our parents have devoted to us to prepare us for adulthood. Then when we flee the nest and begin our adult years it is the investment of time and en- ergy that we place in ourselves. Hopefully, the parent's invest- ments in their children will pay handsome dividends by properly preparing their offspring for suc- cessful and rewarding careers. Recently a young man asked me what was the best way to create wealth when starting from basi- cally nothing than 22 years of ed- ucation. Since he said his parents had in- vested in a college education for him I told him he really wasn't starting from ground zero since most good opportunities required at least a four-year degree. I then gave the graduate my best answer for how he could create wealth, as quickly as possible. In short, select a career opportu- nity that would financially reward him based on his productivity and not his credentials. Find a voca- tion that will base your future in- come on your ability to produce. Don'tchose a career path that gives you an income because you have a four-year college degree or perhaps an master's degree in business administration. If you do, you Will be paid just the same as your peers, and average pay doesn't create wealth. To become affluent, you need to earn enough dollars not only to pay your bills, but to make sub- stantial investments and have your capital working for you at the same time. You also need to be prepared to make sacrifices. Careers that base earnings on your productivity generally aren't nine to five jobs. In the early years these vocations generally call for 60 or more com- mitted hours a week. These aren't just time clock hours; these are 60 hard working effective hours. These are jobs that for all pra6tical purposes are lifestyles. In other words you live, eat and breathe the job for several years. Routinely the productivity measured jobs require the individ- ual to do all the things the mass of people aren't willingto do. A lot of times these wealth building jobs call for the employee to meet with rejection constantly especial- ly if they are dealing with the pub- lic. So you need to be able to han- dle rejection on a daily basis, and you need to develop an attitude of stick-to-it-ness. The best way I found to handle the negative effect of wealth cre- ating careers is to be driven by well defined personal and family goals. Your goals, if truly defined, will get you over the difficult times or to use Mr. Greenspan's FINANCE term the "soft patches." In addition, if you want to earn superior wages, you need to find productivity based vocations that require the individual to produce their own work rather than the processing of someone else's work. It is much more difficult to create your own work day than it is to do what you are told. In sales that might mean devel- oping your own market for a prod- uct or service. Finding the most appropriate people or companies to call on or using your creativity to develop your business plan. It calls for constant thinking outside the box. Our nation's work force is prob- ably composed of 98 percent processors of work rather than creators. But then again we are discussing how to create wealth and the people that are willing to sacrifice and earn those extra dol- lars are certainly in the extreme min6rity. The other day, while I was con- ducting one-on-one employee in- terviews in regards to a 401(k) plan that I recently took over, I met several young people, below 30 years of age, making $100,000, $200,000 and $300,000 dollars a year after only being with the company for just two and three years. I was impressed to say the least. As a matter of fact, if the ac- count executives aren't earning $100,000 by the end of their first full year, chances are they will be released by the company. This was truly a company that only wanted individuals with big Continued onpage 34  CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, Nov. 19- Nov. 22, 2004.33 BUsiNE00ss & REAL00E'STATE Chunkin, Jazz Fest draw honors from Southern Delaware Tourism By Jim Cresson Punkin Chunkin Association President Frank Shade and Re- hoboth Beach Jazz Festival founder Sydney Arzt were hon- ored for their contributions to tourism at the third annual awards ceremony of Southern Delaware Tourism Nov. 16 at Sussex Pines Country Club. Over the past 19 years, the lo- cally created Punkin Chunkin World Championship has grown from a handful of contestants and a few score fans to more than 80 contestants and more than 30,000 fans. For its tremendous populari- ty as a destination event, Punkin Chunkin was chosen this year as one of the American Bus Associa- tion's (ABA) top 100 special events nationwide. Past ABA- sponsored awards bestowed by Southern Delaware Tourism in- clude the Sea Witch Festival and Coast Day. For 15 years, the Rehoboth Beach Autumn Jazz Festival has brought tens of thousands of mu- sic lovers to Rehoboth Beach and Dewey Beach to hear some of the best jazz musicians in the country. For that success, Jazz Fest founder Arzt was honored with the 2004 Southern Delaware Tourism Award. "We have a very unique county with individuals and groups that start small local events which of- ten grow to become very big and , very popular," said Karen O'Neill, executive director of Southern Delaware Tourism. "We've become such a popular shoulder-season destination be- cause of our special events that we're now competing with Martha's Vineyard and Annapo- lis." Arzt spoke of her involvement in the Rehoboth Beach Autumn Jazz Festival, saying that when she moved to Rehoboth Beach 20 years ago, "I never believed I'd have the chance to impact tourism the way the jazz festival has." Shade said that although Punkin Chunkin regularly attracts more than 30,000 people, "There's al- ways room for more." Shade also said that he and Punkin Chunkin Association officers, with the help of Sussex County administrator Bob Stickels, are diligently searching for a new chunkin loca, tion that could be purchased as a permanent home for the world's championship event. "For us chunkers, we believe to a person that the event should stay here in Sussex," said Shade. Rob Marshall, cochalr of South- em Delaware Tourism and owner of Atlantic Oceanside MOtel and Suites in Dewey Beach, discussed Southern Delaware Tourism's role as a convention and visitors bu- reau. Marshall said Southern Delaware Tourism receives a por- Jim Cresson photos Punkin Chunkin Association President Frank Shade accepts the American Bus Association award from Amy Wood, marketing manager for Southern Delaware Tourism. The American Bus Association rated the annual Punkin Chunkin World Championship in Sussex as one of the top 100 events in the nation. tion of state lodging tax money and distributes it to local cham- bers of commerce to promote their local area and events. "Strong chambers make strong communities," said Marshall. "Businesses benefit from the chambers, and the chambers not only provide lots of volunteers for . ./ tourism events, but they also give a lot of feedback to Southern Delaware Tourism. All of us are always iooking for ways to pro- mote tourism and publicize local chamber and business events." Marshall said Southern Delaware Tourism and local chambers develop marketing plans identifying what is best for each community and what they want to promote. He said that Delaware currently has the lowest tourism budget in the nation. De- spite that, Marshall said; Delaware has.one of the highest returns on its promotional market- ing, drawing many; many visitors to the area. "Let people know that we al- Continued on page 34 Pr" "" "als " oou00t00,notcr entl ,lead,toaccumula00veealtll : !.= .. "  ' :17 .... : _  :-::,-i : " .......  ..:. t. .... , In "Webster,s New World Dic-" tionary" and "Thesaurus" the edi- tors list the following as types of investments: stocks, bonds, secu- rities, property, real estate, mort- gage, capital, mutual funds, hedge funds, debentures, futures, pre- cious metals and gems. And these are the types of investments that we normally discuss in the finan- cial arena on a daily basis. In my opinion, "Webster's Dic- tionary" has left out the most im- portant type of investment that ex- ists. That is the investment that our parents lay out for us during our formative years and the in- vestment we place in ourselves in our adult years. In other words, it is the time and money our parents have devoted to us to prepare us for adulthood. Then when we flee the nest and begin our adult years it is the investment of time and en- ergy that we place in ourselves. Hopefully, the parent's invest- ments in their children will pay handsome dividends by properly preparing their offspring for suc- cessful and rewarding careers. Recently a young man asked me what was the best way to create wealth when starting from basi- cally nothing than 22 years of ed- ucation. Since he said his parents had in- vested in a college education for him I told him he really wasn't starting from ground zero since most good opportunities required at least a four-year degree. I then gave the graduate my best answer for how he could create wealth, as quickly as possible. In short, select a career opportu- nity that would financially reward him based on his productivity and not his credentials. Find a voca- tion that will base your future in- come on your ability to produce. Don'tchose a career path that gives you an income because you have a four-year college degree or perhaps an master's degree in business administration. If you do, you Will be paid just the same as your peers, and average pay doesn't create wealth. To become affluent, you need to earn enough dollars not only to pay your bills, but to make sub- stantial investments and have your capital working for you at the same time. You also need to be prepared to make sacrifices. Careers that base earnings on your productivity generally aren't nine to five jobs. In the early years these vocations generally call for 60 or more com- mitted hours a week. These aren't just time clock hours; these are 60 hard working effective hours. These are jobs that for all pra6tical purposes are lifestyles. In other words you live, eat and breathe the job for several years. Routinely the productivity measured jobs require the individ- ual to do all the things the mass of people aren't willingto do. A lot of times these wealth building jobs call for the employee to meet with rejection constantly especial- ly if they are dealing with the pub- lic. So you need to be able to han- dle rejection on a daily basis, and you need to develop an attitude of stick-to-it-ness. The best way I found to handle the negative effect of wealth cre- ating careers is to be driven by well defined personal and family goals. Your goals, if truly defined, will get you over the difficult times or to use Mr. Greenspan's FINANCE term the "soft patches." In addition, if you want to earn superior wages, you need to find productivity based vocations that require the individual to produce their own work rather than the processing of someone else's work. It is much more difficult to create your own work day than it is to do what you are told. In sales that might mean devel- oping your own market for a prod- uct or service. Finding the most appropriate people or companies to call on or using your creativity to develop your business plan. It calls for constant thinking outside the box. Our nation's work force is prob- ably composed of 98 percent processors of work rather than creators. But then again we are discussing how to create wealth and the people that are willing to sacrifice and earn those extra dol- lars are certainly in the extreme min6rity. The other day, while I was con- ducting one-on-one employee in- terviews in regards to a 401(k) plan that I recently took over, I met several young people, below 30 years of age, making $100,000, $200,000 and $300,000 dollars a year after only being with the company for just two and three years. I was impressed to say the least. As a matter of fact, if the ac- count executives aren't earning $100,000 by the end of their first full year, chances are they will be released by the company. This was truly a company that only wanted individuals with big Continued onpage 34