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November 19, 2004     Cape Gazette
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November 19, 2004
 

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GAPE LIFE CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, Nov. 19 - Nov. 22, 2004 - 59 SPCA join'is resc.uers in Home 4 the Holidays there are so many wonderful homeless pets in Delaware who would be a welcomed addition for an individual or family." The Home 4 the Holidays partnership brings Delaware SPCA, Kent County SPCA and animal res- CALDWELL cue groups within the Delaware Domestic Animal Coalition in partnership with the Iams Company, PETCO Animal Supplies, Inc., PETCO Foundation and more than 1,300 pet adoption centers in America. The holiday promotions raise awareness of the joys of owning Shelter-adopted pets. Special events are being held throughout the state through the first week of January to match people and fam- ilies with a new pet. The group's slogan is, "Save a life and bring a lifetime of joy into your home." Nationally, organizers hope to link more than 200,000 dogs, cats, puppies and kittens and other companion pets with adoptive families this year. In the United States, 5 million homeless pets. are euthanized each year, down from a recent 127 mil- lion animals because of growing community commitments to spay/neuter programs and adop- tion outreach promotions. "Last year's Home 4 the By Jim Cresson The Delaware SPCAon Nov. 13 unveiled a new partnership with animal rescuers to promote adop- tion of unwanted pets during the holidays through a program called Home 4 the Holidays. Also on Nov. 13, the SPCA Sussex shelter opened its newly expanded building and announced it would increase its hours of weekday operations mad open from 10 aim. to 3 p.m. on Saturdays. Sussex shelter manager Lt. Jerry Linkerhof and staff began immediately promoting pet adop- tions during the holidays by spreading the word and setting .up a holiday Christmas tree decorat- ed with photos of adopted pets with their new owners. Within four working days, dozens of pho- tos of smiling people and their new pets hung from the tree. "It's been busy here since Saturday," said Einkerhof. "The holiday adoption tree is looking good." The cold months usually bring an influx of unwanted or aban- doned pets to the SPCA shelters in Delaware. The holiday season generally brings in people who want to adopt a pet to give a fam- ily member or friend. "Each year in Delaware, about 30,000 dogs and cats come into shelters, and 14,332 are eutha- nized while waiting for a new family," said John Caldwell, SPCA executive director. "Our goal is to raise awareness that I Jim Cremmn photo Home 4 the Holidays pet adoption partnership promotes holiday adoptions through the ' first week of January. Each adoption results in a photo of the pet and its new owner. SPCA Lt. Jerry Linkerhof stands beside the holiday tree at the SPCA's Sussex shelter on Route 113 in Georgetown, open weekdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturdays. Holidays was a tremendous-suc- cess across the country," said Jane Pierantozzi, executive director of Faithful Friends and cochair of the Delaware Domestic Animal Coalition. "This is the lrLrst year of our partnership, and we hope to find homes for hundreds of the pets in adoption facilities across Delaware," she said. The Sussex SPCA shelter on Route 113 in Georgetown is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturdays. "The facility will close Christmas Day and New Year's Day. TheAnimal Rescue League of Sussex also has animals for adop- I I tion. It can be reached by calling 684-1942. The Historic Lewes Cat Society can be reached at 645-1575, and the Dewey Beach Feral Cat Society can be reached at 381- 2908. For more information on local shelters, visit www.Pet finder.org/sbelters/DE 19 .html The changing face of our holidays This is the second article in a three-part series on the changing family and the holidays as we cel- ebrate them today. Actually there is no first part; this is just a stan- dard opening I copied from those who win prestigious journalistic prizes; columnists rarely win prizes because no one knows what they are talking about anyway. However I will keep going because I know we will all face the holidays realizing we actually have to interact with other people. And that means family. Pretty soon children away at college will be arriving at your front door, looking for that good old fash- ioned meal and some good old fashioned pampering, especially after a tough year of hitting the books. These won't be your chil- dren of course, since most of them have already air-freighted their dirty laundry ahead of schedule and are still scouting the interact for cheap airline tickets to places AROUND TOWN Nancy Katz listed under the category of "Anything Hot Where They Accept Fake I.D.s" Seriously, having your children gather at your home during the holidays still is a traditional ritual. They used to arrive dressed respectably in loafers, shirts that fit, pants that were not the size of masts on sailboats and buzz hair- cuts. In other words, they were recognizable. Some left that way when they set off to follow the road to higher learning and broad- en their minds so they would be well equipped to enter the work force and make contributions to society. "My son was so pale and dehy- drated when he arrived atL Thanksgiving," a friend told me. "Cramming all night for mid-. term exams?" I asked. "Not unless you are required to, wear a Hawaiian shirt, drink grainL alcohol from a rubber tube andl limit your vocabulary to Wooly, Booley. We had to borrow a frontt end loader from DelDOT just to, move his d av, dr v, . garage." So different is the mass of pro- toplasm that was sent off to col- lege that many parents break out " the photo album just to verify they actually had children upon greet- ing what's landed on their front steps. OK, so oujr memories aren't up to par either. 'that's .nothing," another friend told me. "'I asked my son what the best thing about coming home was. You know, I'm a great cook and I make a mean sponge cake. He shrugged and told me just hav- ing a rest was what his body need- ed." Well they do get worn out between classes and seminars. And they get sleep deprived. She shook her head. "He mumbled that it was hard to get wasted on our standard bar stock, prune juice and Metamucil." Hey, that first year of college is not always about grades. You kx, there   .  -ak adjustment too. So you might . expect your child to bring home a friend during the holidays. It's a good way for the family to finally meet the sort of people that your son hangs around with and proba- bly has considerable influence. The truth is that person will more than likely be the campus dog, This mutt has attended more classes than Einstein. He could actually qualify for a PhD. He also has subsisted on a diet of pizza, beer and cardboard. More than likely the dog will be a black lab" with a suspicious name like "Rasta Man." A word of warning - once Rasta Man gets a look at anything to eat that doesn't come out of a box, he's yours for life. Many dogs enroll in universities so that they can find a permanent home during holiday v.isits. Some things will change as you celebrate your holidays. And then again some things remain station- a_-. -,udrr 9, Va-,a a  laundry. I never thought I would say this, but with all the turmoil going on in the world today, it's good to just stand around and turn the spin cycle. qrrlllllrllilll'rl Tl1! rIITTI"I ! 'll111111I!117 lIT f rrlllr illlff Jlllf IF'lIT Tiflt F "1T [ GAPE LIFE CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, Nov. 19 - Nov. 22, 2004 - 59 SPCA join'is resc.uers in Home 4 the Holidays there are so many wonderful homeless pets in Delaware who would be a welcomed addition for an individual or family." The Home 4 the Holidays partnership brings Delaware SPCA, Kent County SPCA and animal res- CALDWELL cue groups within the Delaware Domestic Animal Coalition in partnership with the Iams Company, PETCO Animal Supplies, Inc., PETCO Foundation and more than 1,300 pet adoption centers in America. The holiday promotions raise awareness of the joys of owning Shelter-adopted pets. Special events are being held throughout the state through the first week of January to match people and fam- ilies with a new pet. The group's slogan is, "Save a life and bring a lifetime of joy into your home." Nationally, organizers hope to link more than 200,000 dogs, cats, puppies and kittens and other companion pets with adoptive families this year. In the United States, 5 million homeless pets. are euthanized each year, down from a recent 127 mil- lion animals because of growing community commitments to spay/neuter programs and adop- tion outreach promotions. "Last year's Home 4 the By Jim Cresson The Delaware SPCAon Nov. 13 unveiled a new partnership with animal rescuers to promote adop- tion of unwanted pets during the holidays through a program called Home 4 the Holidays. Also on Nov. 13, the SPCA Sussex shelter opened its newly expanded building and announced it would increase its hours of weekday operations mad open from 10 aim. to 3 p.m. on Saturdays. Sussex shelter manager Lt. Jerry Linkerhof and staff began immediately promoting pet adop- tions during the holidays by spreading the word and setting .up a holiday Christmas tree decorat- ed with photos of adopted pets with their new owners. Within four working days, dozens of pho- tos of smiling people and their new pets hung from the tree. "It's been busy here since Saturday," said Einkerhof. "The holiday adoption tree is looking good." The cold months usually bring an influx of unwanted or aban- doned pets to the SPCA shelters in Delaware. The holiday season generally brings in people who want to adopt a pet to give a fam- ily member or friend. "Each year in Delaware, about 30,000 dogs and cats come into shelters, and 14,332 are eutha- nized while waiting for a new family," said John Caldwell, SPCA executive director. "Our goal is to raise awareness that I Jim Cremmn photo Home 4 the Holidays pet adoption partnership promotes holiday adoptions through the ' first week of January. Each adoption results in a photo of the pet and its new owner. SPCA Lt. Jerry Linkerhof stands beside the holiday tree at the SPCA's Sussex shelter on Route 113 in Georgetown, open weekdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturdays. Holidays was a tremendous-suc- cess across the country," said Jane Pierantozzi, executive director of Faithful Friends and cochair of the Delaware Domestic Animal Coalition. "This is the lrLrst year of our partnership, and we hope to find homes for hundreds of the pets in adoption facilities across Delaware," she said. The Sussex SPCA shelter on Route 113 in Georgetown is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturdays. "The facility will close Christmas Day and New Year's Day. TheAnimal Rescue League of Sussex also has animals for adop- I I tion. It can be reached by calling 684-1942. The Historic Lewes Cat Society can be reached at 645-1575, and the Dewey Beach Feral Cat Society can be reached at 381- 2908. For more information on local shelters, visit www.Pet finder.org/sbelters/DE 19 .html The changing face of our holidays This is the second article in a three-part series on the changing family and the holidays as we cel- ebrate them today. Actually there is no first part; this is just a stan- dard opening I copied from those who win prestigious journalistic prizes; columnists rarely win prizes because no one knows what they are talking about anyway. However I will keep going because I know we will all face the holidays realizing we actually have to interact with other people. And that means family. Pretty soon children away at college will be arriving at your front door, looking for that good old fash- ioned meal and some good old fashioned pampering, especially after a tough year of hitting the books. These won't be your chil- dren of course, since most of them have already air-freighted their dirty laundry ahead of schedule and are still scouting the interact for cheap airline tickets to places AROUND TOWN Nancy Katz listed under the category of "Anything Hot Where They Accept Fake I.D.s" Seriously, having your children gather at your home during the holidays still is a traditional ritual. They used to arrive dressed respectably in loafers, shirts that fit, pants that were not the size of masts on sailboats and buzz hair- cuts. In other words, they were recognizable. Some left that way when they set off to follow the road to higher learning and broad- en their minds so they would be well equipped to enter the work force and make contributions to society. "My son was so pale and dehy- drated when he arrived atL Thanksgiving," a friend told me. "Cramming all night for mid-. term exams?" I asked. "Not unless you are required to, wear a Hawaiian shirt, drink grainL alcohol from a rubber tube andl limit your vocabulary to Wooly, Booley. We had to borrow a frontt end loader from DelDOT just to, move his d av, dr v, . garage." So different is the mass of pro- toplasm that was sent off to col- lege that many parents break out " the photo album just to verify they actually had children upon greet- ing what's landed on their front steps. OK, so oujr memories aren't up to par either. 'that's .nothing," another friend told me. "'I asked my son what the best thing about coming home was. You know, I'm a great cook and I make a mean sponge cake. He shrugged and told me just hav- ing a rest was what his body need- ed." Well they do get worn out between classes and seminars. And they get sleep deprived. She shook her head. "He mumbled that it was hard to get wasted on our standard bar stock, prune juice and Metamucil." Hey, that first year of college is not always about grades. You kx, there   .  -ak adjustment too. So you might . expect your child to bring home a friend during the holidays. It's a good way for the family to finally meet the sort of people that your son hangs around with and proba- bly has considerable influence. The truth is that person will more than likely be the campus dog, This mutt has attended more classes than Einstein. He could actually qualify for a PhD. He also has subsisted on a diet of pizza, beer and cardboard. More than likely the dog will be a black lab" with a suspicious name like "Rasta Man." A word of warning - once Rasta Man gets a look at anything to eat that doesn't come out of a box, he's yours for life. Many dogs enroll in universities so that they can find a permanent home during holiday v.isits. Some things will change as you celebrate your holidays. And then again some things remain station- a_-. -,udrr 9, Va-,a a  laundry. I never thought I would say this, but with all the turmoil going on in the world today, it's good to just stand around and turn the spin cycle. qrrlllllrllilll'rl Tl1! rIITTI"I ! 'll111111I!117 lIT f rrlllr illlff Jlllf IF'lIT Tiflt F "1T [