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Lewes, Delaware
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November 19, 2004     Cape Gazette
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62 - CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, Nov. 19 - Nov. 22, 2004 Book signing for Vol. 7 of LHS Journal set Dec. 4 A book signing for the new 2004 issue of the Journal of the Lewes Historical Society, the sev- enth in a series of annual local his- tory books, will be held Saturday, Dec. 4. Several authors of articles in this publication will be on hand to sign copies and discuss this lo- cal history project from 9 a.m. to I p.m. at the Fisher-Martin House, where the Lewes Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Center is located, on Kings Highway in Lewes. Additionally, local historian Hazel D. Brittingham will be available at the Groome United Methodist Church from 10 a.m. to noon to sign copies of the Journal, which includes her article about the 100-year history of that church, located on Savannah Road. Local historian Judith Atkins Roberts will also be at the Lewes Presbyterian Church on Kings Highway from 10 a.m. to noon to sign copies of her book of church history called A Nickel in the Cup as well as Volume 7 of the Jour- nal, which contains articles by her about General Nelson Appleton Miles, for whom Fort Miles was named, and journalist Marjorie Virden. Residents of the area and visi- tors who have an interest in local history will want to add this newest issue of the Journal to their libraries. The theme is "No- table, Lewes People" of the past. Some Of people featured were from the relatively recent past of the middle of the last century, so reading about them will stir mem- ories for some local readers. Trenny Elliott presents a por- trait of her father, James Edward Marvil, the first president of the Lewes Historical Society. Former Lewes fire department chief, the much admired Louis A. Rickards, left a manuscript-in-progress at his untimely death in 2002, in which he reminisced about his family's grocery business and the work involved with supplying the menhaden fishing fleet. The edi- tors of the Journal are pleased that the Rickards.family allowed these childhood memories to be pub- lished as an article called "Grub- bing Them Fishboats." Other figures who made unique contributions to the local commu- nity are featured: "Ruth Cham- bers Stewart" by Ruth Mankin, "Frederick Douglas Thomas" by Barbara Vaughan, "Lest We For- get: Virginia Cullen" by Hazel D. Brittingham and "Mayor William E. Walsh" by Gary Grunder. Readers will probably be sur- prised to learn that the discoverer of the use of iodized salt to pre- vent thyroid disease was an ama- teur archeologist in Lewes, Dr. David Marine, described in an ar- ticle by Warren MacDonald. Reaching back in time, Hazel Brittingham describes "Eliza Ann Marshall," who was born in Lewes during the War of 1812. E. D. Bryan wrote a history of drug stores and various druggists in Lewes from the early 1800s through most of the 20th century. "Sara Fisher Clampitt Ames" by Robert G. Stewart provides a por- trait of this Lewes native, who be- Au pair exchange group seeks volunteers Eur AuPair, a cultural exchange group for au pairs, is seeking volun- teers.to help promote and administer the program in the local communi- ty. By interviewing families interested in hosting, and acting as an advi- sor to young adults from South America, Europe and Canada, volun- teers will have a positive influence on young women who have an inter- est in learning about American culture while they provide a service to their host family. For more information, call area coordinator Debbie Riddle at 610- 388-6547 or visit www.euraupair.com. Donate New & Oent00.Osed Chilchn's Shoes at Good Feet FEET HURT' Good Feet Arch Supports Help Tired Feet, Sore Feet, Aching Back, Legs & KneesSy Providhg Balance, Comfort & Suppo00 Shoes for the Entire Family g -- FREE o0d PRINT YOURARCn sun-eoJr STO f," Foinls onboth Your celt, 22200Oul'onl Ow00.KLII5 MUbbo00 JO2-9300-7,k)O IoaShop, tn,As Sm oR TV.a 10-6, SaL 10-5  Sun, lrS came a well-regarded sculptress with a famous subject in the mid- 1800s. Another intriguing artistic figure of Lewes in the early 1700s is "Henry Brooke: Colonial Poet" by Betty Grunder. Robert G. Stewart also explores the mystery of an obscure man, William By- ron, born in Mall and presumably brought to America as a slave. Ryves Holt, an important figure in Lewes in the early 1700s, is de- scribed in an article by Michael DiPaolo. Finally, the earliest Lewes resident whose life in the 1600s is recalled in the Journal is "Pieter Cornelius Plockhoy" by Warren MacDonald. This newest issue of the Journal also contains many interesting old photographs and some original artwork by local marine artist, Steve Rogers. Copies of this 64-page publica- tion will be available at the book signing, along with former vol- umes issued in 2001 through 2003, for $5 each. Local stores that carry these publications as a service tO the Lewes Historical Society include Books By the Bay, Stepping Stone, Saxon Swan and Dockside Gifts in downtown Lewes. They can also be found at the Ellegood House Museum Shop at the Historic Complex, Third and Shipcarpenter Streets, which will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 4, 5, 6, 11, and 18. For more information, contact Betty Grunder, Journal editor, at 645-8214. 1, Specializing in n   Service. Bartending  Catering of Tempting Hers D'oovres  M Clean up 111 lib  Relax and enjoy your Holiday ParM j[r.. / , Call 302-344-I 163 How to move away from home and still stay in the neighborhood. ::' t the Heritage Community, we know how important it is for retirees to be around friends and family, We know what it moans to keep in touch with the counterman at the dell, or swap stories with your favorite barber. That's why we build our Assisted Living Communities right in your neighbomood -- so you never .have to leave all of that behind. What we do help you leave behind are all'the wordes and day-to-day reoonsibilities of taking care of your home and yourself, At the Heritage Communities you'll enjoy the come-and-go freedom 3f living, 24-hour security transportation, gracious dining, elegant amenities and living the full life you deserve at ;;/lhis stage of your life - all without the burden of a heavy }inancial :- commitment. !'k Visit the Heritage Communities ....... while youTe in the neighborhood. It's a great place to get away to... and still stay put. 62 - CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, Nov. 19 - Nov. 22, 2004 Book signing for Vol. 7 of LHS Journal set Dec. 4 A book signing for the new 2004 issue of the Journal of the Lewes Historical Society, the sev- enth in a series of annual local his- tory books, will be held Saturday, Dec. 4. Several authors of articles in this publication will be on hand to sign copies and discuss this lo- cal history project from 9 a.m. to I p.m. at the Fisher-Martin House, where the Lewes Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Center is located, on Kings Highway in Lewes. Additionally, local historian Hazel D. Brittingham will be available at the Groome United Methodist Church from 10 a.m. to noon to sign copies of the Journal, which includes her article about the 100-year history of that church, located on Savannah Road. Local historian Judith Atkins Roberts will also be at the Lewes Presbyterian Church on Kings Highway from 10 a.m. to noon to sign copies of her book of church history called A Nickel in the Cup as well as Volume 7 of the Jour- nal, which contains articles by her about General Nelson Appleton Miles, for whom Fort Miles was named, and journalist Marjorie Virden. Residents of the area and visi- tors who have an interest in local history will want to add this newest issue of the Journal to their libraries. The theme is "No- table, Lewes People" of the past. Some Of people featured were from the relatively recent past of the middle of the last century, so reading about them will stir mem- ories for some local readers. Trenny Elliott presents a por- trait of her father, James Edward Marvil, the first president of the Lewes Historical Society. Former Lewes fire department chief, the much admired Louis A. Rickards, left a manuscript-in-progress at his untimely death in 2002, in which he reminisced about his family's grocery business and the work involved with supplying the menhaden fishing fleet. The edi- tors of the Journal are pleased that the Rickards.family allowed these childhood memories to be pub- lished as an article called "Grub- bing Them Fishboats." Other figures who made unique contributions to the local commu- nity are featured: "Ruth Cham- bers Stewart" by Ruth Mankin, "Frederick Douglas Thomas" by Barbara Vaughan, "Lest We For- get: Virginia Cullen" by Hazel D. Brittingham and "Mayor William E. Walsh" by Gary Grunder. Readers will probably be sur- prised to learn that the discoverer of the use of iodized salt to pre- vent thyroid disease was an ama- teur archeologist in Lewes, Dr. David Marine, described in an ar- ticle by Warren MacDonald. Reaching back in time, Hazel Brittingham describes "Eliza Ann Marshall," who was born in Lewes during the War of 1812. E. D. Bryan wrote a history of drug stores and various druggists in Lewes from the early 1800s through most of the 20th century. "Sara Fisher Clampitt Ames" by Robert G. Stewart provides a por- trait of this Lewes native, who be- Au pair exchange group seeks volunteers Eur AuPair, a cultural exchange group for au pairs, is seeking volun- teers.to help promote and administer the program in the local communi- ty. By interviewing families interested in hosting, and acting as an advi- sor to young adults from South America, Europe and Canada, volun- teers will have a positive influence on young women who have an inter- est in learning about American culture while they provide a service to their host family. For more information, call area coordinator Debbie Riddle at 610- 388-6547 or visit www.euraupair.com. Donate New & Oent00.Osed Chilchn's Shoes at Good Feet FEET HURT' Good Feet Arch Supports Help Tired Feet, Sore Feet, Aching Back, Legs & KneesSy Providhg Balance, Comfort & Suppo00 Shoes for the Entire Family g -- FREE o0d PRINT YOURARCn sun-eoJr STO f," Foinls onboth Your celt, 22200Oul'onl Ow00.KLII5 MUbbo00 JO2-9300-7,k)O IoaShop, tn,As Sm oR TV.a 10-6, SaL 10-5  Sun, lrS came a well-regarded sculptress with a famous subject in the mid- 1800s. Another intriguing artistic figure of Lewes in the early 1700s is "Henry Brooke: Colonial Poet" by Betty Grunder. Robert G. Stewart also explores the mystery of an obscure man, William By- ron, born in Mall and presumably brought to America as a slave. Ryves Holt, an important figure in Lewes in the early 1700s, is de- scribed in an article by Michael DiPaolo. Finally, the earliest Lewes resident whose life in the 1600s is recalled in the Journal is "Pieter Cornelius Plockhoy" by Warren MacDonald. This newest issue of the Journal also contains many interesting old photographs and some original artwork by local marine artist, Steve Rogers. Copies of this 64-page publica- tion will be available at the book signing, along with former vol- umes issued in 2001 through 2003, for $5 each. Local stores that carry these publications as a service tO the Lewes Historical Society include Books By the Bay, Stepping Stone, Saxon Swan and Dockside Gifts in downtown Lewes. They can also be found at the Ellegood House Museum Shop at the Historic Complex, Third and Shipcarpenter Streets, which will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 4, 5, 6, 11, and 18. For more information, contact Betty Grunder, Journal editor, at 645-8214. 1, Specializing in n   Service. Bartending  Catering of Tempting Hers D'oovres  M Clean up 111 lib  Relax and enjoy your Holiday ParM j[r.. / , Call 302-344-I 163 How to move away from home and still stay in the neighborhood. ::' t the Heritage Community, we know how important it is for retirees to be around friends and family, We know what it moans to keep in touch with the counterman at the dell, or swap stories with your favorite barber. That's why we build our Assisted Living Communities right in your neighbomood -- so you never .have to leave all of that behind. What we do help you leave behind are all'the wordes and day-to-day reoonsibilities of taking care of your home and yourself, At the Heritage Communities you'll enjoy the come-and-go freedom 3f living, 24-hour security transportation, gracious dining, elegant amenities and living the full life you deserve at ;;/lhis stage of your life - all without the burden of a heavy }inancial :- commitment. !'k Visit the Heritage Communities ....... while youTe in the neighborhood. It's a great place to get away to... and still stay put.