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November 19, 2004     Cape Gazette
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-1- CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, Nov. 19 - Nov. 22, 2004 - 115 D Fo,:)D & RINK Lawson's 'Domestic Goddess': Like attending culinary school at home By Sheilah Kaufman A Domestic Goddess (you may be one and not know it!) is one who enjoys being in the kitchen, bakes, takes sensuous pleat sure in the entire process and relishes the outcome. Sometime ago I became a Domestic Goddess, having worked my way throug h Nigella Lawson's cookbook "How To Be A Domestic Goddess: Baking and the Art of Comfort Cooking." Now I decided to see if she offered some- thing else, like a refresher course, from her other books, including "Nigella Bites," "Forever Summer" and "Feast." Nigella has become a household name through her television shows, symbolizing all that is sumptuous and pleasurable about food, and her delectable recipes are easy to make, dreamy to look at, and of course, delicious to eat. To cook and eat your way through her books is like attending a culinary school in your own home. With the holidays approaching, I thought about Nigella's phi- losophy: the meals we eat say something fundamental about who we are and how we want to live. Whenever an occasion or hol- iday matters to us, we mark it with food and use food to celebrate life. We usually eat holiday meals around 5 p.m., so out-of-town guest and kids usually want something to eat to tide them over between breakfast and dinner. Try these fabulous Italian "grilled cheese sandwich- es." Great served with a dish of chili sauce! Easily doubled or tripled. MOZZARELLA IN CARROZZA 6 slices white bread, crusts removed 1 fist-sized ball of mozzarella, cut into 1/4-inch strips 1/2 C whole milk 3 heaping T flour 1 large egg salt freshly ground pepper olive oil (not extra virgin) for frying Make sandwiches out of the bread and mozzarella, leaving a little margin around the edges unfilled with cheese, and press the edges together with your finger to help seal (white bread is easier). Pour the milk into a soup bowl, and the flour into another, and beat the egg with salt and pepper in another. Warm the oil in a skillet over medium heat. Dunk the sandwiches briefly, one by one, in the milk, then dredge in the flour, then dip in the beaten egg. Fry in the hot oil on each side until crisp and golden. Remove to a paper towel. Cut in half and dig in. Serves two. LEMON RISOTTO For those who don't like sweet potatoes with their turkey (I have a family full of them), try this luscious Lemon Risotto. 2 shallots 1 rib of celery 1/4 C unsalted butter 1 T olive oil 1 1/2 C risotto rice, preferably arborio approximately I quart vegetable stock zest and juice of 1/2 unwaxed lemon needles from 2 small sprigs of fresh rose- mary, finely chopped I large egg yolk 4 T grated Parmesan, plus more to sprin- kle 4 T heavy cream sea salt to taste freshly ground pepper Place the shallots and celery into a mini food processor and pulse until they are a finely chopped mush. Heat half the butter, the oil and the shallot and celery mixture in a wide saucepan, and cook to soften the mixture for about 5 minutes, making sure it does not stick: Mix in the rice, stirring to give it a good coating of oil and butter. Heat the stock in another pan and keep it at the simmering point. NIGELLA LAWSON t, HOW TO BE A DOMESTIC GODDESS BAKING AND Tffl ART OF COhI:ORT COOKING Nigella has become a household name through her television shows, symbolizing all that is sumptuous and pleasurable about food, and her delectable recipes are easy to make, dreamy to look at, and of course, deli- cious to eat. Pour a ladleful of the stock into the rice and keep stirring until the stock is absorbed. Then add another ladleful and stir again. Continue doing this until the rice is al dente. You may not need all of the stock, or you may need to add simmering hot water. Mix the lemon zest and the rosemary into the risotto, and in a small bowl 19eat the egg yolk, lemon juice, Pmmesan, cream, and "pepper. When the risotto is ready, when the rice is no longer chalky, but still has some bite, take it off the heat and add the bowl or the egg mixture, and the remaining butter and salt to taste. Serve with more grated Parmesan. Serves 4. Riesling, pinot gris and Gewurztraminer enhance Turkey Day Since this will be my last blast before Thanksgiving let me wish all the best for the holiglay. Think Riesling, pinot gris and Gewurztraminer ! ! This past week has been very enjoyable for me. Monday and' Tuesday were spent in Chicago at a trade show. I hadn't been to Chicago in quite a while and I had for- gotten what a vibrant jazz scene they had going there. After a long day of walking the aisles, I checked in to the Amalfi Hotel, a great place to stay, by the way. The hotel is fight in the heart of the jazz district and I spent each evening hanging out listening to some great music. Wednesday and Thursday were even more enjoyable. I spent the best part of both days teaching classes in wine appreciation at UMES-Elderhostel, in Ocean City. I have been teaching these classes for the past 11 years and each time I am called on to do so, I see wine from an entirely new perspective. I usually, start each series by asking a battery of ques- tions to ascertain the best areas to explore. Most groups run about 20 people and gen- erally speaking, they are stuck in the Chardonnay rut. Whenever I come to the conclusion that the group is Stuck, in this fashion, my course of action is clear to me. I start with a component tasting, then follow it up with exposure to good drink- Continued on page 116 Well, it takes one to know one. A turkey, that is. Thanksgiving is next week, so let's get ready. Yes, the election is over, but there's still room for fowl play. But first, if the Pilgrims were alive today, what would they be the most famous for? Their age, of course. Before we get to Thanksgiving, I will bet you whatever you want to bet that by the Saturday after, you will want something other than turkey. This recipe is the fix,' outstanding and easy. SHRIMP and LOBSTER JAMBALAYA Car Microwave (Optional) Get in your car. Drive to the Lewes Fishhouse. Ask for Deanna Slater. Get a pint or two of the best Jambalaya I have ever FOCUS ON FOOD had. Drive home. Microwave, if desired. Serve. Eat your heart out, New Orleans. This would definitely make a great side dish for Thanksgiving. But it is even better as an easy respite from the hams and turkeys and fruitcakes you have to deal with during this wonderfully fes- tive season. In fact, you can eat the Jambalaya while you are prepar- ing Thanksgiving dinner. And, here are two excellent recipes for stuffing your turkey. NEW ENGLAND STUFFING 14 oz. brick oven white bread, cut in 1/2-inch cubes 1 1/2 pounds sweet Italian sausage, casings removed 1/2 stick unsalted butter 3 large leeks, white and pale green parts only, chopped pound tart green apples, peeled, cored, chopped 2 C chopped celery 3 t poultry seasoning 1 C dried cranberries 4 t chopped fresh rosemary  2/3 C chopped fresh parsley 3 eggs, beaten to blend 1 1/3 C chicken broth Preheat oven to 350 E Divide bread cubes between 2 large bak- ine, sheets. Bake until slightly dry, about 15 minutes. Cool com- pletely. " Saut6 sausage in heavy large skillet over medium-high heat until cooked through, crumbling coarsely with back of spoon. Using slotted spoon, transfer sausage to large bowl. Pour off any drippings from skillet. Melt butter in same skillet over medi- um-high heat. Add leeks (No, not leaks - the election is over.), apples, celery and poultry season- ing to skillet; saut6 until leeks soften. Mix in dried cranberries and rosemary. (Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme. Oh, wait a minute, that's a song. The parsley comes later. And for the sage and thyme, please see the next recipe. So for now, just add the rose- mary.) Add mixture to sausage, then mix in bread and parsley. Season stuffing to taste with salt and pepper. Mix eggs into stuff- ing. To bake stuffing in turkey: Fill main turkey cavity with stuffing. Mix enough chicken broth into remaining stuffing to moisten (about 1/2 to 1 cup chicken broth). Spoon remaining stuffing into buttered baking dish. Cover with buttered aluminum foil. Bake Continued on page 116 [ [ I ]Tfl'ilrFFNIIIIITTImlTIIIIITH 1- ""'Y1' ' I T"I ' , r]g?lTlllfllllllll illllllallllllllllllUil, inllr- I " r -1- CAPE GAZETTE, Friday, Nov. 19 - Nov. 22, 2004 - 115 D Fo,:)D & RINK Lawson's 'Domestic Goddess': Like attending culinary school at home By Sheilah Kaufman A Domestic Goddess (you may be one and not know it!) is one who enjoys being in the kitchen, bakes, takes sensuous pleat sure in the entire process and relishes the outcome. Sometime ago I became a Domestic Goddess, having worked my way throug h Nigella Lawson's cookbook "How To Be A Domestic Goddess: Baking and the Art of Comfort Cooking." Now I decided to see if she offered some- thing else, like a refresher course, from her other books, including "Nigella Bites," "Forever Summer" and "Feast." Nigella has become a household name through her television shows, symbolizing all that is sumptuous and pleasurable about food, and her delectable recipes are easy to make, dreamy to look at, and of course, delicious to eat. To cook and eat your way through her books is like attending a culinary school in your own home. With the holidays approaching, I thought about Nigella's phi- losophy: the meals we eat say something fundamental about who we are and how we want to live. Whenever an occasion or hol- iday matters to us, we mark it with food and use food to celebrate life. We usually eat holiday meals around 5 p.m., so out-of-town guest and kids usually want something to eat to tide them over between breakfast and dinner. Try these fabulous Italian "grilled cheese sandwich- es." Great served with a dish of chili sauce! Easily doubled or tripled. MOZZARELLA IN CARROZZA 6 slices white bread, crusts removed 1 fist-sized ball of mozzarella, cut into 1/4-inch strips 1/2 C whole milk 3 heaping T flour 1 large egg salt freshly ground pepper olive oil (not extra virgin) for frying Make sandwiches out of the bread and mozzarella, leaving a little margin around the edges unfilled with cheese, and press the edges together with your finger to help seal (white bread is easier). Pour the milk into a soup bowl, and the flour into another, and beat the egg with salt and pepper in another. Warm the oil in a skillet over medium heat. Dunk the sandwiches briefly, one by one, in the milk, then dredge in the flour, then dip in the beaten egg. Fry in the hot oil on each side until crisp and golden. Remove to a paper towel. Cut in half and dig in. Serves two. LEMON RISOTTO For those who don't like sweet potatoes with their turkey (I have a family full of them), try this luscious Lemon Risotto. 2 shallots 1 rib of celery 1/4 C unsalted butter 1 T olive oil 1 1/2 C risotto rice, preferably arborio approximately I quart vegetable stock zest and juice of 1/2 unwaxed lemon needles from 2 small sprigs of fresh rose- mary, finely chopped I large egg yolk 4 T grated Parmesan, plus more to sprin- kle 4 T heavy cream sea salt to taste freshly ground pepper Place the shallots and celery into a mini food processor and pulse until they are a finely chopped mush. Heat half the butter, the oil and the shallot and celery mixture in a wide saucepan, and cook to soften the mixture for about 5 minutes, making sure it does not stick: Mix in the rice, stirring to give it a good coating of oil and butter. Heat the stock in another pan and keep it at the simmering point. NIGELLA LAWSON t, HOW TO BE A DOMESTIC GODDESS BAKING AND Tffl ART OF COhI:ORT COOKING Nigella has become a household name through her television shows, symbolizing all that is sumptuous and pleasurable about food, and her delectable recipes are easy to make, dreamy to look at, and of course, deli- cious to eat. Pour a ladleful of the stock into the rice and keep stirring until the stock is absorbed. Then add another ladleful and stir again. Continue doing this until the rice is al dente. You may not need all of the stock, or you may need to add simmering hot water. Mix the lemon zest and the rosemary into the risotto, and in a small bowl 19eat the egg yolk, lemon juice, Pmmesan, cream, and "pepper. When the risotto is ready, when the rice is no longer chalky, but still has some bite, take it off the heat and add the bowl or the egg mixture, and the remaining butter and salt to taste. Serve with more grated Parmesan. Serves 4. Riesling, pinot gris and Gewurztraminer enhance Turkey Day Since this will be my last blast before Thanksgiving let me wish all the best for the holiglay. Think Riesling, pinot gris and Gewurztraminer ! ! This past week has been very enjoyable for me. Monday and' Tuesday were spent in Chicago at a trade show. I hadn't been to Chicago in quite a while and I had for- gotten what a vibrant jazz scene they had going there. After a long day of walking the aisles, I checked in to the Amalfi Hotel, a great place to stay, by the way. The hotel is fight in the heart of the jazz district and I spent each evening hanging out listening to some great music. Wednesday and Thursday were even more enjoyable. I spent the best part of both days teaching classes in wine appreciation at UMES-Elderhostel, in Ocean City. I have been teaching these classes for the past 11 years and each time I am called on to do so, I see wine from an entirely new perspective. I usually, start each series by asking a battery of ques- tions to ascertain the best areas to explore. Most groups run about 20 people and gen- erally speaking, they are stuck in the Chardonnay rut. Whenever I come to the conclusion that the group is Stuck, in this fashion, my course of action is clear to me. I start with a component tasting, then follow it up with exposure to good drink- Continued on page 116 Well, it takes one to know one. A turkey, that is. Thanksgiving is next week, so let's get ready. Yes, the election is over, but there's still room for fowl play. But first, if the Pilgrims were alive today, what would they be the most famous for? Their age, of course. Before we get to Thanksgiving, I will bet you whatever you want to bet that by the Saturday after, you will want something other than turkey. This recipe is the fix,' outstanding and easy. SHRIMP and LOBSTER JAMBALAYA Car Microwave (Optional) Get in your car. Drive to the Lewes Fishhouse. Ask for Deanna Slater. Get a pint or two of the best Jambalaya I have ever FOCUS ON FOOD had. Drive home. Microwave, if desired. Serve. Eat your heart out, New Orleans. This would definitely make a great side dish for Thanksgiving. But it is even better as an easy respite from the hams and turkeys and fruitcakes you have to deal with during this wonderfully fes- tive season. In fact, you can eat the Jambalaya while you are prepar- ing Thanksgiving dinner. And, here are two excellent recipes for stuffing your turkey. NEW ENGLAND STUFFING 14 oz. brick oven white bread, cut in 1/2-inch cubes 1 1/2 pounds sweet Italian sausage, casings removed 1/2 stick unsalted butter 3 large leeks, white and pale green parts only, chopped pound tart green apples, peeled, cored, chopped 2 C chopped celery 3 t poultry seasoning 1 C dried cranberries 4 t chopped fresh rosemary  2/3 C chopped fresh parsley 3 eggs, beaten to blend 1 1/3 C chicken broth Preheat oven to 350 E Divide bread cubes between 2 large bak- ine, sheets. Bake until slightly dry, about 15 minutes. Cool com- pletely. " Saut6 sausage in heavy large skillet over medium-high heat until cooked through, crumbling coarsely with back of spoon. Using slotted spoon, transfer sausage to large bowl. Pour off any drippings from skillet. Melt butter in same skillet over medi- um-high heat. Add leeks (No, not leaks - the election is over.), apples, celery and poultry season- ing to skillet; saut6 until leeks soften. Mix in dried cranberries and rosemary. (Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme. Oh, wait a minute, that's a song. The parsley comes later. And for the sage and thyme, please see the next recipe. So for now, just add the rose- mary.) Add mixture to sausage, then mix in bread and parsley. Season stuffing to taste with salt and pepper. Mix eggs into stuff- ing. To bake stuffing in turkey: Fill main turkey cavity with stuffing. Mix enough chicken broth into remaining stuffing to moisten (about 1/2 to 1 cup chicken broth). Spoon remaining stuffing into buttered baking dish. Cover with buttered aluminum foil. Bake Continued on page 116 [ [ I ]Tfl'ilrFFNIIIIITTImlTIIIIITH 1- ""'Y1' ' I T"I ' , r]g?lTlllfllllllll illllllallllllllllllUil, inllr- I " r