Newspaper Archive of
Cape Gazette
Lewes, Delaware
Jim's Towing Service
December 6, 2002     Cape Gazette
PAGE 6     (6 of 132 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 6     (6 of 132 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
December 6, 2002
 

Newspaper Archive of Cape Gazette produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




VIEWPOINTS Preserving our. sense of place Land use expert Ed McMahon raised a strong voice recently in cel- ebration of preserving a local sense of place. He said'rather than accepting the corporate sameness rolling across the land from "off- the-shelf' architectural designs, we should accept and demand more. "Americans don't flock to places to see-sameness; they want to see local flavor," said McMahon. "If you accept junk, you will get junk." How critical for an area dependent on tourism. McMahon showed photographs of McDonald's franchises located in restored downtown buildings; in a brand new paddlewheeler steamboat in St. Louis; in a restored and expanded 1860's-style building in Freeport, Maine; in a rust-red adobe, pueblo-style build- ing in New Mexico. He showed statistics proving that companies paying attention to fitting in with local architecture and using native species for landscaping typically increase their business. Plenty of local examples confirm McMahon's statements. Many restaurants that have taken over period houses in Lewes and Rehoboth Beach are thriving. The Rehoboth Outlets centers across the highway from each other near the entrance to Rehoboth Beach incorporated a vari- ety of local architectural elements - the local vernacular - into their design as well as extensive landscaping. Are they successful? McMahon said the first step is to ask. Milton has the opportunity tO get on the bandwagon. A Happy Harry's and Food Lion shopping center are coming to a prominent location on Route 16. Milton offi- cials should be asking the developer how those buildings will be designed to reflect Milton's strong maritime and historical architec- tural heritage. In Rock Hall on Maryland's Eastern Shore, planners asked that a new Happy Harry's reflect local architectural elements of that waterman's community. The result? A Happy Harry's store that looks different than others in Delaware and Maryland - a Happy Harry's that fits the COmmUnity rather than asking the community to fit it. Milton could play a leadership role; the timing is good. Downtown Milton offers plenty of architectural examples that could lead to creation of a new shopping center that enhances, rather than erodes, Milton's important historic heritage. On Route 1, Wawa is planning to do extensive work at its store on the southboundside at the Freeman Highway intersection. There too is an opportunity for the company to go a little further and design a new Wawa building that incorporates local historic flavor in its design. On Route 24, a new McDonald's is being planned. McDonald's and Wawa should look at the building in Dewey Beach that Jack Redefer built for Rehoboth By The Sea Realty - a building that looks like one of the US Lifesaving Stations - as an example of attuning with the local vernacular. Sussex County's Planning and Zoning Commission can play a major role in helping this expansive county avoid losing its sense of place. When projects are proposed, one of the first questions should be: "How will this project enhance our sense of place in Sussex County?" McMahon brought a message important to the long-term future of Sussex County. We should be listening carefully and taking action when opportunities arise. Letters The Weather Picture BI Nov. 28 38 Nov. 29 46 24 None Nov. 30 53 42 .12 Dec. 1 53 32 None Dec. 2 48 25 None Dec. 3 46 25 None Dec. 4 32 19 Trc. Power Plant, an official U.S. Weather Station. Dan Cook photo The season's first snow storm created a wintery scene along Beaverdam Creek where it is crossed by Cave Neck Road. Public needs to be more aware of IR plant pollution Do you care that the Indian River Power Plant is considered the most dangerous pollution source in Delaware? It is primarily coal-fired, and came on line in 1957. Due to exemptions in the Federal Clean Air Act, it has been allowed to pollute at general levels 10 times worse than a newer plant coming on line today! Its Title V Permit ("permission to pol- lute" permi0 is up for DNREC public hearing (partly due to the requests from the Clean Air Council.) This is your chance to be part of a crucial effort! Let's become aware of the problems and create solutions togeth- er. Come to the public hearing and voice your opinion. The workshop begins at 5 p.m. and the hearing starts at 6 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 19, at Sussex Central High School, 301 W. Market Street, Georgetown. Statements or written testimony may be presented orally or in written form before the hearing. It is request- ed that those interested in presenting statements register in advance by emailing: Penny.gentry@state.de.us or by mail - Air Quality Management Section, Division of Air and Waste Management; 156 S. State Street, Dover, DE 19901; or by fax at 302- 739-3106. Did you know: Carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxide, sulfur dioxide, soot and smog-forming pollution, mer- cury, and other toxic heavy metals are released at alarming amounts from this OLD COAL burning plant. Indian River Power Plant releases large amounts of mercury (over 300 pounds a year). Mercury has numer- ous deleterious health effects and causes developmental effects in babies that are born to mothers who ate contaminated fish while pregnant. 1/70th of a teaspoon of mercury is enough to kill a 24-acre lake. Nitrogen oxide emissions in Delaware are among the worst in the Mid-Atlantic region, and electric util- ities in Sussex County account for 70 percent of these emissions. Nitrogen loading to the Delaware Inland Bays and heavy metal contam- ination from the power plant greatly affects your health, tourism, environ- mental safety and fishing revenues. During the 2002 Delaware ozone season through Aug 12, there has been: 15 declared code red days, 11 declared codeorange days, Delaware has exceeded the Federal Clean Air Act hour ozone standards 65 times, and the 1 hour ozone standard 6 times; The Lewes monitoring station exceeded the 8 hour ozone standard 14 times, of which seven of those times there was no excess in New Castle. It has been estimated that coal-fired plants have serious health conse- quences around a 30 mile radius and the worst consequences are experi- enced by families living within five miles. Is it healthy for your child to play outdoors? You need to come to the public hearing to learn what Indian River plant emits (which creates seri- ous question of our air quality safety). Asthma, high Delaware cancer rates and exposure to known carcino- gens and neurotoxins, slow lung func- tion growth, chronic bronchitis and sinusitis and more have connection to air pollution. Please come to the hearing to learn about these issues. We as a commu- nity should be able to come together and create long term solutions for this problem that protects our health and still effectively provide power for the region. Learn about decisions that are made that may be very hazardous to your health. Questions? Come to the hearing, or contact the Clean Air Council (www.cleanair.org) or phone them at: 302-691-0112 The meeting announcement is also found on del- marvacommunitywellnet.net. Kim D. Furtado, N.D. Naturopathic physician Continued on page 7 0 Volume 10 No. 29 Publisher Dennis Forney dnf@capegazette.com Editor "Irish Vernon newsroom @ capegazette.corn Associate EdRor Kerry Kester kester @ capegazette.com News Steve Hoenigmann steveh @ capegazette.com Jim Cresson cresson @ capegazette.com Rosanne Pack Jen Ellingsworth jen @ capegazette.com Bridin Reynolds-Hughes bridin @ capegazette.com Janet Andrelczyk Andrew Keegan akeegan @ capegazette.com Amy Reardon areardon @ capegazette.com Photographers Dan Cook Keith Mosher Erik Sumption Sports Editor Dave Frederick davefredman @ eel.corn Sports Writers Tim Bamforth tbamforth @ prodigy.net Frederick Schranck Fschranck@HoleByHole.com Advertising Cindy Bowlin cindy @ capegazette.com Sharon Hudson shudson @ capegazette.com Amanda Lucks arnandal @ capegazette.com Becki Hastings beckih @capegazette.com Pat Jones Classified Sandy Barr Kim McPike Office Manager Kathy Emery kernery @ capegazette.com Webmaeter Catherine M. Tanzer web@capegazette.corn Receptionist Kandy Vicary Circulation Harry Stoner Ioni Weber joni @ capegazette.com )roduction Coordinator Norma Parks nparks @ capegazette.corn Production Staff :Chris Wildt Molly Wingate Teresa Rodriguez Laura Kucharik Ron Winters{ein Contributors: Susan Frederick Nancy Katz Entail for news, letters: newsroom @ capegazette.com Email for advertising: )roduction@ capegazette.corn Email to subscribe: subscdbe @ capegazette.com The Cape Gazette (LISPS 010294) is published by Cape Gazette Umited 6,ery Friday at the Midway Shopping Center, Highway One, Rehoboth Beach DE 19971, Second-class post- age paid at Rehoboth Beach, Delaware, Address all correspon- dence to Cape Gazette, PO Box 213, Lewes, Delaware 19958. Telephone: 302-645-7700. FAX: 645-1664. Subscriptions are available at $27 per year in Sussex County; $45 else- where. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Cape Gazette, P.O. Box 213, Lewes, Delaware 19958. "If a tree dies, plant another in its place." -Linnaeus VIEWPOINTS Preserving our. sense of place Land use expert Ed McMahon raised a strong voice recently in cel- ebration of preserving a local sense of place. He said'rather than accepting the corporate sameness rolling across the land from "off- the-shelf' architectural designs, we should accept and demand more. "Americans don't flock to places to see-sameness; they want to see local flavor," said McMahon. "If you accept junk, you will get junk." How critical for an area dependent on tourism. McMahon showed photographs of McDonald's franchises located in restored downtown buildings; in a brand new paddlewheeler steamboat in St. Louis; in a restored and expanded 1860's-style building in Freeport, Maine; in a rust-red adobe, pueblo-style build- ing in New Mexico. He showed statistics proving that companies paying attention to fitting in with local architecture and using native species for landscaping typically increase their business. Plenty of local examples confirm McMahon's statements. Many restaurants that have taken over period houses in Lewes and Rehoboth Beach are thriving. The Rehoboth Outlets centers across the highway from each other near the entrance to Rehoboth Beach incorporated a vari- ety of local architectural elements - the local vernacular - into their design as well as extensive landscaping. Are they successful? McMahon said the first step is to ask. Milton has the opportunity tO get on the bandwagon. A Happy Harry's and Food Lion shopping center are coming to a prominent location on Route 16. Milton offi- cials should be asking the developer how those buildings will be designed to reflect Milton's strong maritime and historical architec- tural heritage. In Rock Hall on Maryland's Eastern Shore, planners asked that a new Happy Harry's reflect local architectural elements of that waterman's community. The result? A Happy Harry's store that looks different than others in Delaware and Maryland - a Happy Harry's that fits the COmmUnity rather than asking the community to fit it. Milton could play a leadership role; the timing is good. Downtown Milton offers plenty of architectural examples that could lead to creation of a new shopping center that enhances, rather than erodes, Milton's important historic heritage. On Route 1, Wawa is planning to do extensive work at its store on the southboundside at the Freeman Highway intersection. There too is an opportunity for the company to go a little further and design a new Wawa building that incorporates local historic flavor in its design. On Route 24, a new McDonald's is being planned. McDonald's and Wawa should look at the building in Dewey Beach that Jack Redefer built for Rehoboth By The Sea Realty - a building that looks like one of the US Lifesaving Stations - as an example of attuning with the local vernacular. Sussex County's Planning and Zoning Commission can play a major role in helping this expansive county avoid losing its sense of place. When projects are proposed, one of the first questions should be: "How will this project enhance our sense of place in Sussex County?" McMahon brought a message important to the long-term future of Sussex County. We should be listening carefully and taking action when opportunities arise. Letters The Weather Picture BI Nov. 28 38 Nov. 29 46 24 None Nov. 30 53 42 .12 Dec. 1 53 32 None Dec. 2 48 25 None Dec. 3 46 25 None Dec. 4 32 19 Trc. Power Plant, an official U.S. Weather Station. Dan Cook photo The season's first snow storm created a wintery scene along Beaverdam Creek where it is crossed by Cave Neck Road. Public needs to be more aware of IR plant pollution Do you care that the Indian River Power Plant is considered the most dangerous pollution source in Delaware? It is primarily coal-fired, and came on line in 1957. Due to exemptions in the Federal Clean Air Act, it has been allowed to pollute at general levels 10 times worse than a newer plant coming on line today! Its Title V Permit ("permission to pol- lute" permi0 is up for DNREC public hearing (partly due to the requests from the Clean Air Council.) This is your chance to be part of a crucial effort! Let's become aware of the problems and create solutions togeth- er. Come to the public hearing and voice your opinion. The workshop begins at 5 p.m. and the hearing starts at 6 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 19, at Sussex Central High School, 301 W. Market Street, Georgetown. Statements or written testimony may be presented orally or in written form before the hearing. It is request- ed that those interested in presenting statements register in advance by emailing: Penny.gentry@state.de.us or by mail - Air Quality Management Section, Division of Air and Waste Management; 156 S. State Street, Dover, DE 19901; or by fax at 302- 739-3106. Did you know: Carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxide, sulfur dioxide, soot and smog-forming pollution, mer- cury, and other toxic heavy metals are released at alarming amounts from this OLD COAL burning plant. Indian River Power Plant releases large amounts of mercury (over 300 pounds a year). Mercury has numer- ous deleterious health effects and causes developmental effects in babies that are born to mothers who ate contaminated fish while pregnant. 1/70th of a teaspoon of mercury is enough to kill a 24-acre lake. Nitrogen oxide emissions in Delaware are among the worst in the Mid-Atlantic region, and electric util- ities in Sussex County account for 70 percent of these emissions. Nitrogen loading to the Delaware Inland Bays and heavy metal contam- ination from the power plant greatly affects your health, tourism, environ- mental safety and fishing revenues. During the 2002 Delaware ozone season through Aug 12, there has been: 15 declared code red days, 11 declared codeorange days, Delaware has exceeded the Federal Clean Air Act hour ozone standards 65 times, and the 1 hour ozone standard 6 times; The Lewes monitoring station exceeded the 8 hour ozone standard 14 times, of which seven of those times there was no excess in New Castle. It has been estimated that coal-fired plants have serious health conse- quences around a 30 mile radius and the worst consequences are experi- enced by families living within five miles. Is it healthy for your child to play outdoors? You need to come to the public hearing to learn what Indian River plant emits (which creates seri- ous question of our air quality safety). Asthma, high Delaware cancer rates and exposure to known carcino- gens and neurotoxins, slow lung func- tion growth, chronic bronchitis and sinusitis and more have connection to air pollution. Please come to the hearing to learn about these issues. We as a commu- nity should be able to come together and create long term solutions for this problem that protects our health and still effectively provide power for the region. Learn about decisions that are made that may be very hazardous to your health. Questions? Come to the hearing, or contact the Clean Air Council (www.cleanair.org) or phone them at: 302-691-0112 The meeting announcement is also found on del- marvacommunitywellnet.net. Kim D. Furtado, N.D. Naturopathic physician Continued on page 7 0 Volume 10 No. 29 Publisher Dennis Forney dnf@capegazette.com Editor "Irish Vernon newsroom @ capegazette.corn Associate EdRor Kerry Kester kester @ capegazette.com News Steve Hoenigmann steveh @ capegazette.com Jim Cresson cresson @ capegazette.com Rosanne Pack Jen Ellingsworth jen @ capegazette.com Bridin Reynolds-Hughes bridin @ capegazette.com Janet Andrelczyk Andrew Keegan akeegan @ capegazette.com Amy Reardon areardon @ capegazette.com Photographers Dan Cook Keith Mosher Erik Sumption Sports Editor Dave Frederick davefredman @ eel.corn Sports Writers Tim Bamforth tbamforth @ prodigy.net Frederick Schranck Fschranck@HoleByHole.com Advertising Cindy Bowlin cindy @ capegazette.com Sharon Hudson shudson @ capegazette.com Amanda Lucks arnandal @ capegazette.com Becki Hastings beckih @capegazette.com Pat Jones Classified Sandy Barr Kim McPike Office Manager Kathy Emery kernery @ capegazette.com Webmaeter Catherine M. Tanzer web@capegazette.corn Receptionist Kandy Vicary Circulation Harry Stoner Ioni Weber joni @ capegazette.com )roduction Coordinator Norma Parks nparks @ capegazette.corn Production Staff :Chris Wildt Molly Wingate Teresa Rodriguez Laura Kucharik Ron Winters{ein Contributors: Susan Frederick Nancy Katz Entail for news, letters: newsroom @ capegazette.com Email for advertising: )roduction@ capegazette.corn Email to subscribe: subscdbe @ capegazette.com The Cape Gazette (LISPS 010294) is published by Cape Gazette Umited 6,ery Friday at the Midway Shopping Center, Highway One, Rehoboth Beach DE 19971, Second-class post- age paid at Rehoboth Beach, Delaware, Address all correspon- dence to Cape Gazette, PO Box 213, Lewes, Delaware 19958. Telephone: 302-645-7700. FAX: 645-1664. Subscriptions are available at $27 per year in Sussex County; $45 else- where. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Cape Gazette, P.O. Box 213, Lewes, Delaware 19958. "If a tree dies, plant another in its place." -Linnaeus