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Continued from page 7 cal government regarding the use of our land and the quality of life in our community. We have build- ing codes, setback limits, and oth- er restrictions which can be fairly imposed in the public interest. Downzoning through a fair process with adequate notice is simply a decision which reflects the general good of the communi- ty rather than surrendering to the selfish interests of individual property owners. Those property owners who wish to commercially develop lots at the northwest end of Columbia Avenue apparently fail to understand that the value of those lots is due to the quality of life in Rehoboth Beach. That val- ue has been created by thoughtful city decisions about appropriate land use and development, and the maintenance of traditionally resi- dential neighborhoods. Apparent- ly it is not enough for those seek- ing commercial development to simply reap the large increases in value which apply even to resi- dential properties; they want more. Our city commissioners have no obligation to allow such a commercial windfall, and they have every duty to protect the general public interest by approv- ing the recommended zoning. For all these reasons I urge the city commissioners to approve the thoughtful and procedurally fair rezoning proposed by the plan- ning commission. .Guy R. Martin Rehoboth Beach Is Sussex really growing fastest? According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Sussex County's popula- tion increased by 38.3 percent from 1990 to 2000. By contrast, Kent County increased by 14.1 percent and New Castle County seemingly was the laggard, with only a 13.2 percent increase over the 10-year period. Does this mean that Sussex County was Delaware's fastest growing caln- ty. The answer is a resounding NO. In fact, as we'll soon see, it's not even close .......... The use of percentages to com- pare population growth would be valid only if the beginning popu- lations were approximately the same at the starting point, or over a very long period of time. As a simple demonstration, consider a hypothetical county with a popu- lation of 100 that increased to 200 over a 10-year period. That would be 100 percent growth, but can we say that it experienced faster growth than another county of 500,000 that increased by 10 per- cent? Surely all can agree that adding 50,000 people is more than adding 100, especially if the size of the land areas were similar. (If you really want to insist on using percentages, I'll trade you 100 percent of a dollar for 10 percent of a million dollars.) Now we can clearly see that the density increase in New Castle County is 2.97 times greater than Sussex and a whopping 5.07 times greater than that of Kent County. Not only that, the actual popula- tion increase in New Castle was 34 percent greater than that of Sussex, despite the fact that Sus- sex County is 2.2 times larger. What about the future? If Sus- sex County keeps growing at 38.3 percent every decade, and New Castle continues at 13.2 percent, will Sussex ever catch up? Yes, but you will need a lot of patience. Population would roughly equal- ize in 60 years at a little over 1 million people in each county. Sussex, however, would have less than half the density of New Cas- tle County and would still be less dense than New Castle County is today! It will take nearly 100 years for density to equalize. Pru- dent citizens will allow future leaders to worry about that possi- bility. This is the second article the Positive Growth Alliance has pre- sented regarding density in Sussex County. The other, tiffed "Reality Check on Growth," can be viewed on our website at positive- growthalliance.org by clicking on the button "articles." The hope is that by presenting a realistic per- spective on population density, the debate will concentrate on an area that we can actually do some- thing about, transportation infra- structure. Transportation infra- structure is a subject we will be discussing in depth in the near fu- ture. For the time being, let us say that evidence is mounting that a deliberate decision in 1991 by federal and state governments to substitute capacity preservation for capacity enhancement is start- ing to bear bitter fruit. Richard G. Collins Executive director Positive Growth Alliance Make open space preservation reality Nov. 25 was a good day for the coastal Sussex community. Those of us who attended the day-long program titled Community Plan- ning for Open Space and Natural Resource Protection owe a debt of thanks to the major organizers of the day - long and excellent pre- sentations, The Greater Lewes Foundation and the University of Delaware Sea Grant College Pro- gram. All community interests were present: elected officials, planning board members, professional agency staff, eminent experienced environmental professionals, the development community and citi- zens. We were exposed to positive examples of how open space can be achieved and planned. Perhaps just as important, we were given proof that open space is of prov- able dollar value to everyone and is not just some pie dream. Now it is up to us to take what we learned and work together to make the goal of open space preservation a constant reality on the ground. Thanks! Mable Granke Rehoboth Beach Simpson thanks voters, committee and family Now that this year's election is over, I want to express my sincere thanks to the voters of the 18th Senate District for again giving me the opportunity to represent them in the State Senate. I know that I have been given a rare privi- lege, and I will work to justify the confidence you have shown in me during the years ahead. I also want to commend my op- ponent, John Burton, for running a clean race, without negative per- sonal attacks. He and his family always treated me with utmost kindness and respect. I couldn't have asked for more from an op- ponent. John is to be congratulat- ed for the caliber of his campaign and I look forward to working with him on issues of mutual con- cem in the months ahead. I especially want to thank my wonderful friends, family and donors who volunteered their time, talents and resources during this campaign. I know that I am extremely fortunate to have friends such as you and I know that I could have never achieved any of this on my own without your help and encouragement. My campaign committee is simply the best and words cannot adequately express my thanks to this group of trusted advisors. And finally, I thank my wife, Debbie, and all the other spouses who bear the brunt of each cam- paign. As you might guess, cam- paigns are not easy; they disrupt family life, they place candidates and their families under intense personal scrutiny, and they stress relationships. Through it all though, I have a wife who has re- mained my biggest fan. I am, in- deed, a very fortunate and-blessed man. Again, thank you voters for your support. I look forward to your input in the months ahead as it relates to issues of concern or about upcoming legislation. There's much to be done, and rep- resentative democracy works best when I know your thoughts on critical issues. Please feel free to call me at home at 422-3460 or my Dover office at 744-4134 or email me at gsimpson@udel.edu. I look forward to hearing from you. F. Gary Simpson State Senator Boating council favors Assawoman dredging I'm writing to express the sup- port of the Delaware Boating Council for the dredging of As- sawoman Canalas a minimal ef- fort to save the Indian River Bay from continued silting of its exist- ing channels and eutrophication of its waters. We as an organization are not only concerned with such matters as boating safety, availability of water access and fishing. We are also very concerned with the con- tinued deterioration of Delaware's Inland Bays. We are asking you to support the dredging of the Assawoman Canal in the immediate future. Our reasons follow: 1. At a minimum, the opening of the canal to three feet at mean low tide would aid in the flushing of the Indian River Bay and to a much lesser extent Rehoboth Bay. This relief would also lessen the scouring of the Indian River Inlet since some of the tidal flow would be diverted south to the As- sawoman Bay. True, this is not a panacea for the bay's problems but it is a start. The arguments that dredging would permanently af- fect the wildlife and shellfish pop- ulation in the canal are at best spe- cious. Experience shows that na- ture would restore itself to its pris- tine level in less than five years. As it now is, we are looking at dead water of no use to boaters, fishermen or naturalists. 2. The value of the Inland Bays to Delaware's economy is enor- mous. It does no good to empha- size that the benefit of dredging will only go to a single group such as boaters, fisher people, real es- tate interests, etc., when by inac- tion all interests suffer as the bays turn into dead water swamps, im- passable to boats and suffering from hydrogen sulfide poisoning. 3. The health of the Inland Bays is of vital importance to the ecolo- gy of the adjoining ocean. It is here that the young fish have found a haven and grow to be of harvestable size to feed  grow-: ing population. You, of course, re- member the horrendous fish kills in Bald Eagle Creek and Torquay Canal of the past years. Without proper flushing of the bays, these dire events will recur in ever more frequent episodes. We recognize that this one ef- fort will not solve the complicated deterioration of the inland water- ways. But it is a start. It is better to light one candle than to curse the darkness. In the Nov. 15 issue of the Cape Gazette, there was an article by Clinton Bunting proposing open- ing the Inland Bays to the ocean to affect the positive flushing of the waters. This is a viable approach to curing the sluggishness of the present regime. Too many pollu- tants are still flowing into Re- hoboth Bay from the Rehoboth sewerage treatment facility via the Lewes/Rehoboth Canal outlet as one example. If the waters were exchanged with purer ocean wa- ters in weeks rather than years, this problem (pollution) would be ameliorated. We appreciate the constraints that the current budget crunch has affected what DNREC Secretary John Hughes can accomplish. But this is important, too. Let us find a solution together. The Delaware Boating Council will do all it can to assist him. Safe boating starts with safe waters and dedicated en- vironmentalists. Vincent W. Hatala Executive vice president Delaware Boating Council - Little League says thanks Rehoboth Beach Little League held its first annual Fall Dinner fundraiser at the Lamp Post Restaurant Oct. 30. The event at- tracted more than 80 people for a three-pasta dinner with all the fix- ings. All proceeds from the dinner were donated to the Rehoboth Beach Little League by the gener- ous Steele family, owners of the Lamp Post Restaurant. Fred Minasian Lewes Continued from page 7 cal government regarding the use of our land and the quality of life in our community. We have build- ing codes, setback limits, and oth- er restrictions which can be fairly imposed in the public interest. Downzoning through a fair process with adequate notice is simply a decision which reflects the general good of the communi- ty rather than surrendering to the selfish interests of individual property owners. Those property owners who wish to commercially develop lots at the northwest end of Columbia Avenue apparently fail to understand that the value of those lots is due to the quality of life in Rehoboth Beach. That val- ue has been created by thoughtful city decisions about appropriate land use and development, and the maintenance of traditionally resi- dential neighborhoods. Apparent- ly it is not enough for those seek- ing commercial development to simply reap the large increases in value which apply even to resi- dential properties; they want more. Our city commissioners have no obligation to allow such a commercial windfall, and they have every duty to protect the general public interest by approv- ing the recommended zoning. For all these reasons I urge the city commissioners to approve the thoughtful and procedurally fair rezoning proposed by the plan- ning commission. .Guy R. Martin Rehoboth Beach Is Sussex really growing fastest? According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Sussex County's popula- tion increased by 38.3 percent from 1990 to 2000. By contrast, Kent County increased by 14.1 percent and New Castle County seemingly was the laggard, with only a 13.2 percent increase over the 10-year period. Does this mean that Sussex County was Delaware's fastest growing caln- ty. The answer is a resounding NO. In fact, as we'll soon see, it's not even close .......... The use of percentages to com- pare population growth would be valid only if the beginning popu- lations were approximately the same at the starting point, or over a very long period of time. As a simple demonstration, consider a hypothetical county with a popu- lation of 100 that increased to 200 over a 10-year period. That would be 100 percent growth, but can we say that it experienced faster growth than another county of 500,000 that increased by 10 per- cent? Surely all can agree that adding 50,000 people is more than adding 100, especially if the size of the land areas were similar. (If you really want to insist on using percentages, I'll trade you 100 percent of a dollar for 10 percent of a million dollars.) Now we can clearly see that the density increase in New Castle County is 2.97 times greater than Sussex and a whopping 5.07 times greater than that of Kent County. Not only that, the actual popula- tion increase in New Castle was 34 percent greater than that of Sussex, despite the fact that Sus- sex County is 2.2 times larger. What about the future? If Sus- sex County keeps growing at 38.3 percent every decade, and New Castle continues at 13.2 percent, will Sussex ever catch up? Yes, but you will need a lot of patience. Population would roughly equal- ize in 60 years at a little over 1 million people in each county. Sussex, however, would have less than half the density of New Cas- tle County and would still be less dense than New Castle County is today! It will take nearly 100 years for density to equalize. Pru- dent citizens will allow future leaders to worry about that possi- bility. This is the second article the Positive Growth Alliance has pre- sented regarding density in Sussex County. The other, tiffed "Reality Check on Growth," can be viewed on our website at positive- growthalliance.org by clicking on the button "articles." The hope is that by presenting a realistic per- spective on population density, the debate will concentrate on an area that we can actually do some- thing about, transportation infra- structure. Transportation infra- structure is a subject we will be discussing in depth in the near fu- ture. For the time being, let us say that evidence is mounting that a deliberate decision in 1991 by federal and state governments to substitute capacity preservation for capacity enhancement is start- ing to bear bitter fruit. Richard G. Collins Executive director Positive Growth Alliance Make open space preservation reality Nov. 25 was a good day for the coastal Sussex community. Those of us who attended the day-long program titled Community Plan- ning for Open Space and Natural Resource Protection owe a debt of thanks to the major organizers of the day - long and excellent pre- sentations, The Greater Lewes Foundation and the University of Delaware Sea Grant College Pro- gram. All community interests were present: elected officials, planning board members, professional agency staff, eminent experienced environmental professionals, the development community and citi- zens. We were exposed to positive examples of how open space can be achieved and planned. Perhaps just as important, we were given proof that open space is of prov- able dollar value to everyone and is not just some pie dream. Now it is up to us to take what we learned and work together to make the goal of open space preservation a constant reality on the ground. Thanks! Mable Granke Rehoboth Beach Simpson thanks voters, committee and family Now that this year's election is over, I want to express my sincere thanks to the voters of the 18th Senate District for again giving me the opportunity to represent them in the State Senate. I know that I have been given a rare privi- lege, and I will work to justify the confidence you have shown in me during the years ahead. I also want to commend my op- ponent, John Burton, for running a clean race, without negative per- sonal attacks. He and his family always treated me with utmost kindness and respect. I couldn't have asked for more from an op- ponent. John is to be congratulat- ed for the caliber of his campaign and I look forward to working with him on issues of mutual con- cem in the months ahead. I especially want to thank my wonderful friends, family and donors who volunteered their time, talents and resources during this campaign. I know that I am extremely fortunate to have friends such as you and I know that I could have never achieved any of this on my own without your help and encouragement. My campaign committee is simply the best and words cannot adequately express my thanks to this group of trusted advisors. And finally, I thank my wife, Debbie, and all the other spouses who bear the brunt of each cam- paign. As you might guess, cam- paigns are not easy; they disrupt family life, they place candidates and their families under intense personal scrutiny, and they stress relationships. Through it all though, I have a wife who has re- mained my biggest fan. I am, in- deed, a very fortunate and-blessed man. Again, thank you voters for your support. I look forward to your input in the months ahead as it relates to issues of concern or about upcoming legislation. There's much to be done, and rep- resentative democracy works best when I know your thoughts on critical issues. Please feel free to call me at home at 422-3460 or my Dover office at 744-4134 or email me at gsimpson@udel.edu. I look forward to hearing from you. F. Gary Simpson State Senator Boating council favors Assawoman dredging I'm writing to express the sup- port of the Delaware Boating Council for the dredging of As- sawoman Canalas a minimal ef- fort to save the Indian River Bay from continued silting of its exist- ing channels and eutrophication of its waters. We as an organization are not only concerned with such matters as boating safety, availability of water access and fishing. We are also very concerned with the con- tinued deterioration of Delaware's Inland Bays. We are asking you to support the dredging of the Assawoman Canal in the immediate future. Our reasons follow: 1. At a minimum, the opening of the canal to three feet at mean low tide would aid in the flushing of the Indian River Bay and to a much lesser extent Rehoboth Bay. This relief would also lessen the scouring of the Indian River Inlet since some of the tidal flow would be diverted south to the As- sawoman Bay. True, this is not a panacea for the bay's problems but it is a start. The arguments that dredging would permanently af- fect the wildlife and shellfish pop- ulation in the canal are at best spe- cious. Experience shows that na- ture would restore itself to its pris- tine level in less than five years. As it now is, we are looking at dead water of no use to boaters, fishermen or naturalists. 2. The value of the Inland Bays to Delaware's economy is enor- mous. It does no good to empha- size that the benefit of dredging will only go to a single group such as boaters, fisher people, real es- tate interests, etc., when by inac- tion all interests suffer as the bays turn into dead water swamps, im- passable to boats and suffering from hydrogen sulfide poisoning. 3. The health of the Inland Bays is of vital importance to the ecolo- gy of the adjoining ocean. It is here that the young fish have found a haven and grow to be of harvestable size to feed  grow-: ing population. You, of course, re- member the horrendous fish kills in Bald Eagle Creek and Torquay Canal of the past years. Without proper flushing of the bays, these dire events will recur in ever more frequent episodes. We recognize that this one ef- fort will not solve the complicated deterioration of the inland water- ways. But it is a start. It is better to light one candle than to curse the darkness. In the Nov. 15 issue of the Cape Gazette, there was an article by Clinton Bunting proposing open- ing the Inland Bays to the ocean to affect the positive flushing of the waters. This is a viable approach to curing the sluggishness of the present regime. Too many pollu- tants are still flowing into Re- hoboth Bay from the Rehoboth sewerage treatment facility via the Lewes/Rehoboth Canal outlet as one example. If the waters were exchanged with purer ocean wa- ters in weeks rather than years, this problem (pollution) would be ameliorated. We appreciate the constraints that the current budget crunch has affected what DNREC Secretary John Hughes can accomplish. But this is important, too. Let us find a solution together. The Delaware Boating Council will do all it can to assist him. Safe boating starts with safe waters and dedicated en- vironmentalists. Vincent W. Hatala Executive vice president Delaware Boating Council - Little League says thanks Rehoboth Beach Little League held its first annual Fall Dinner fundraiser at the Lamp Post Restaurant Oct. 30. The event at- tracted more than 80 people for a three-pasta dinner with all the fix- ings. All proceeds from the dinner were donated to the Rehoboth Beach Little League by the gener- ous Steele family, owners of the Lamp Post Restaurant. Fred Minasian Lewes