Newspaper Archive of
Cape Gazette
Lewes, Delaware
Jim's Towing Service
December 6, 2002     Cape Gazette
PAGE 12     (12 of 132 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 12     (12 of 132 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
December 6, 2002
 

Newspaper Archive of Cape Gazette produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




New Prime Hook manager seeks to restore public trust By Jim Cresson New refuge manager Jonathan Schafler is embarked on an admit- tedly challenging mission at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge. He wants to bring the community back into the refuge family. After a series of public relations blunders which alienated many refuge neighbors and caused a once-vibrant and healthy Friends of Prime Hook NWR membership to dwindle, Schafler arrived in late October to restore public trust and revitalize the Friends. Since his arrival, Schafler has stopped at every refuge neigh- bor's home and hand-delivered a handsome U.S, Fish & Wildlife greeting card with a quote from naturalist and author Aldo Leopold: "A thing is fight when it tends to preserve the integrity, sta- bility and beauty of the biotic community. It is wrong when it tends otherwise." Schafler, 41, comes to the job fresh from a successful and simi- lar assignment at the 43,000-acre Crab Orchard NWR in southern Illinois. There he faced a public SCHAFLER resentful over having to pay a refuge admission fee after using free of charge for years. When he left, the public was logging 25,000 hours of volunteer work at the refuge each year. Here he faces a public resentful over a little known federal law regulating development within a five-mile radius of an endangered species habitat: Since the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service reintro- duced the Delmarva Fox Squirrel into the refuge in 1987, that law has surfaced and infuriated neigh- boring landowners wanting to build on their properties. The federally initiated lead-shot cleanup effort at the Broadkiln Sportsmens Club adjacent to Prime Hook Refuge has further infuriated neighbors who recall the refuge-sponsored youth shot- gun training events at the club in the 1980s and question the refuge's complicity in the lead shot dispersal. "I am a biologist who puts wildlife at the top of my priori- ties," said Schafler. "But I'm also a people person and I want to be a good neighbor." State officials to hold public hearing on Indian River Power Plant Dec. 19 By Jim Cresson Air quality and smokestack emissions will be the subjects of discussion as the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC) holds a public workshop and hearing in Georgetown, Dec. 19, regarding two important emission permits for Indian River Power Plant in Millsboro. Draft Title IV and Draft Title V operating permits will be explained during the workshop segment by members of DNREC air quality management sec- tion. The public hearing segment following the workshop will allow citizens and environmental groups to register comment on the plant and the per- mits. Draft Title IV incorporates and contains all appli- cable requirements of the Acid Rain Program estab- lished in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Un- der those requirements, the power plant is liable for all violations of the permit and state and federal rules. Draft Title V consolidates previously issued permit terms and conditions for various emission units into one single permit Title V, including the Title IV per- mit. Under the Title V permit the plant will be re- quired to comply with the terms and conditions of the permit and be liable for all violations of the per- mit conditions and applicable federal and state rules. The 2-inch thick Title V permit application was filed by Indian River Power Plant's former owners, Conectiv Energy, during the late 1990s. The 1957- vintage, predominantly coal-fired, four-boiler plant has been operating verbally off a state permit since the early 1990s. Emissions from all four smoke- stacks (two are incorporated into one large stack, thus only three stacks are visible) are monitored con- tinuously. DNREC agents make unannounced visits to the plant annually to check real time emissions. " All emissions are recorded by the monitoring process and can be reviewed. Those monitoring reports must be filed for state review quarterly. Indian River Power Plant was fined $100,000 for air permit violations stemming from a Sept. 2, 1999, annual compliance inspection by DNREC agents. During that inspection, agents discovered the plant had placed two boilers back into production before notifying DNREC. NRG Energy, a worldwide energy producer, pur- chased the power plant from Conectiv in.2000 after that company had spent $86,714,000 on large capital expenditures at the plant for installation of several emission control elements on each of the four boilers and smokestacks. Conectiv also switched to burning low-sulfur coal, spending an additional $4.4 million for fuel upgrade. University of Delaware College of Marine Studies conducts both water monitoring and Environmental Protection Agency-funded atmospheric studies around Indian River Power Plant. Acid rain studies have involved continuous monitoring of the plant site since 1970. Since the Clean Air Act Amend- ments of 1990, the monitors reveal a 20 percent de- crease in acid rain. But members of the Clean Air Council, a nation- wide public advocacy group seeking to lower emis- sions from power plant smokestacks and halt recent exemptions from Clean Air Act Amendments, cite Indian River Power Plant as one of the air polluters that needs tighter controls. In 1998, Indian River Power Plant emitted 2.9 mil- lion pounds of hydrochloric acid, 199,167 pounds of sulfuric acid and 142,476 pounds of hydrogen fluo- fide into the atmosphere: New Prime Hook manager seeks to restore public trust By Jim Cresson New refuge manager Jonathan Schafler is embarked on an admit- tedly challenging mission at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge. He wants to bring the community back into the refuge family. After a series of public relations blunders which alienated many refuge neighbors and caused a once-vibrant and healthy Friends of Prime Hook NWR membership to dwindle, Schafler arrived in late October to restore public trust and revitalize the Friends. Since his arrival, Schafler has stopped at every refuge neigh- bor's home and hand-delivered a handsome U.S, Fish & Wildlife greeting card with a quote from naturalist and author Aldo Leopold: "A thing is fight when it tends to preserve the integrity, sta- bility and beauty of the biotic community. It is wrong when it tends otherwise." Schafler, 41, comes to the job fresh from a successful and simi- lar assignment at the 43,000-acre Crab Orchard NWR in southern Illinois. There he faced a public SCHAFLER resentful over having to pay a refuge admission fee after using free of charge for years. When he left, the public was logging 25,000 hours of volunteer work at the refuge each year. Here he faces a public resentful over a little known federal law regulating development within a five-mile radius of an endangered species habitat: Since the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service reintro- duced the Delmarva Fox Squirrel into the refuge in 1987, that law has surfaced and infuriated neigh- boring landowners wanting to build on their properties. The federally initiated lead-shot cleanup effort at the Broadkiln Sportsmens Club adjacent to Prime Hook Refuge has further infuriated neighbors who recall the refuge-sponsored youth shot- gun training events at the club in the 1980s and question the refuge's complicity in the lead shot dispersal. "I am a biologist who puts wildlife at the top of my priori- ties," said Schafler. "But I'm also a people person and I want to be a good neighbor." State officials to hold public hearing on Indian River Power Plant Dec. 19 By Jim Cresson Air quality and smokestack emissions will be the subjects of discussion as the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC) holds a public workshop and hearing in Georgetown, Dec. 19, regarding two important emission permits for Indian River Power Plant in Millsboro. Draft Title IV and Draft Title V operating permits will be explained during the workshop segment by members of DNREC air quality management sec- tion. The public hearing segment following the workshop will allow citizens and environmental groups to register comment on the plant and the per- mits. Draft Title IV incorporates and contains all appli- cable requirements of the Acid Rain Program estab- lished in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Un- der those requirements, the power plant is liable for all violations of the permit and state and federal rules. Draft Title V consolidates previously issued permit terms and conditions for various emission units into one single permit Title V, including the Title IV per- mit. Under the Title V permit the plant will be re- quired to comply with the terms and conditions of the permit and be liable for all violations of the per- mit conditions and applicable federal and state rules. The 2-inch thick Title V permit application was filed by Indian River Power Plant's former owners, Conectiv Energy, during the late 1990s. The 1957- vintage, predominantly coal-fired, four-boiler plant has been operating verbally off a state permit since the early 1990s. Emissions from all four smoke- stacks (two are incorporated into one large stack, thus only three stacks are visible) are monitored con- tinuously. DNREC agents make unannounced visits to the plant annually to check real time emissions. " All emissions are recorded by the monitoring process and can be reviewed. Those monitoring reports must be filed for state review quarterly. Indian River Power Plant was fined $100,000 for air permit violations stemming from a Sept. 2, 1999, annual compliance inspection by DNREC agents. During that inspection, agents discovered the plant had placed two boilers back into production before notifying DNREC. NRG Energy, a worldwide energy producer, pur- chased the power plant from Conectiv in.2000 after that company had spent $86,714,000 on large capital expenditures at the plant for installation of several emission control elements on each of the four boilers and smokestacks. Conectiv also switched to burning low-sulfur coal, spending an additional $4.4 million for fuel upgrade. University of Delaware College of Marine Studies conducts both water monitoring and Environmental Protection Agency-funded atmospheric studies around Indian River Power Plant. Acid rain studies have involved continuous monitoring of the plant site since 1970. Since the Clean Air Act Amend- ments of 1990, the monitors reveal a 20 percent de- crease in acid rain. But members of the Clean Air Council, a nation- wide public advocacy group seeking to lower emis- sions from power plant smokestacks and halt recent exemptions from Clean Air Act Amendments, cite Indian River Power Plant as one of the air polluters that needs tighter controls. In 1998, Indian River Power Plant emitted 2.9 mil- lion pounds of hydrochloric acid, 199,167 pounds of sulfuric acid and 142,476 pounds of hydrogen fluo- fide into the atmosphere: